The Most Unbreakable Records in Sports

So I read an article on MLB.com, which you can read here, about 17 of the most unbreakable records in baseball, which believe me, there’s a lot more than 17. This was written in response to yesterday being the 80th anniversary of Johnny Vander Meer’s second consecutive no hitter. But I thought I’d take it a step further and talk about all of sports. I won’t touch on any of the ones they mentioned in the article because the fact I’m stealing their idea for an article doesn’t mean I should steal their content too (even though this article has definitely been written before, but whatever, I’m trying to be a good person). I’m going to do MLB, NFL, and NBA because again, those are the only sports I know anything about.

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MLB-Cy Young’s 511 Career Wins

How this one wasn’t on the MLB.com article is beyond me because this is probably the most untouchable record in sports. People are pretty much in agreement that nobody will ever win 300 games again. Cy Young won 511. Now the Wins stat for pitchers has certainly taken a deep dive in importance, especially considering all the factors that go into achieving one. I mean, Hell, look at Jacob deGrom right now. He has a 1.55 ERA and has won just 4 games this year. But regardless, the Wins stat was the most regarded stat for a long time in baseball before bullpens and pitch counts became so important and is a big reason why the award for pitching excellence bears Young’s name. Here are a few interesting tidbits about how Young reached 511 wins:

-He won at least 30 games in a season 4 times (the average starter that spends the entire season in the Majors and off the DL typically starts about 32-33 games)

-He factored into 50 decisions in 1893 and factored in at least 30 decisions in all but 3 seasons: his rookie year and final 2 seasons

-He pitched over 400 innings in a season 5 times

-Aside from his rookie year, he didn’t throw under 200 innings in a season until he was 43

Amazingly, though, Young is not a member of the 3000 strikeout club despite how many innings he threw. In fact, he only struck out 200 batters in a season twice in his 22-year career. His K/9 was 1.5(!!!). People wonder what’s wrong with Cardinals rookie reliever Jordan Hicks for his K/9 being in the 5’s when he can touch 105 mph on his sinker. The worst in the Majors last season was Giants starter Ty Blach at 4.01. Now granted, the average MLB team only struck out about 2-4 times during this time period vs about 8 times today, but that would still put Young below average for his era.

MLB-Sam Crawford’s 309 Career Triples

Triples were so much easier to hit when Crawford was raising Hell as a Detroit Tiger and Cincinnati Red from 1899-1917. The ballparks were much bigger and home runs were considered to be bad strategy. Crawford averaged roughly 20 triples per season over his 18 MLB seasons. The last time anyone hit 20 triples in a season was Curtis Granderson and Jimmy Rollins in 2007 (both guys actually hit 20 doubles, 20 triples, and 20 home runs in that season). That was a typical season for Crawford. Among the career triples leaderboard, the highest-ranked active player is Jose Reyes with 128 career triples and he’s tied for 84th all time and 181 behind Crawford. Nobody is touching 309.

NFL-Jerry Rice’s 22,895 career receiving yards and 197 receiving touchdowns

Despite the rise of the passing game in the NFL, these numbers aren’t getting eclipsed. Back when Rice played, the passing game was always on the backburner to the ground game and teams weren’t as concerned with stopping it as they are today. If a receiver was putting up Rice’s numbers today, they’d be getting double-teamed like crazy and would open up more opportunities for other receivers. Rice played 20 seasons in the NFL, which doesn’t happen very often for kickers anymore, let alone receivers. The next closest receiver in career receiving yards is Terrell Owens at 15,934 yards (though Larry Fitzgerald is RIGHT behind him at 15,545) and the next closest in receiving touchdowns is Randy Moss with 156. The fact that we’re in this era of receiving and still nobody is close just proves that nobody is touching Rice.

NFL-Paul Krause’s 81 career interceptions (also, Dick “Night Train” Lane’s 14 interceptions in a season in 1952)

There were a few guys who were approaching this lately, like Rod Woodson finished with 71 picks and Ed Reed reached 64, but nobody is ever going to eclipse Krause’s 81 career interceptions and nobody is ever going to even sniff Lane’s 14 for a season. My main reason behind this is simple: when a guy is starting to rack up a lot of picks, quarterbacks start to avoid them. There hasn’t been a guy with 10 interceptions in a season since Antonio Cromartie in 2007 so despite the rise in passing numbers, I don’t foresee anybody sniffing Krause or Lane’s numbers just because NFL teams wizen up to known ballhawks now.

NBA-Pretty much any record Wilt Chamberlain still has

100 points in a game, 23,924 career rebounds, 50.1 points per game in a season, those are the three big ones that aren’t getting sniffed. Chamberlain accomplished a lot of these while there was no 3-second rule so he could just hang out in the paint all game. He was also just much bigger than everybody else and could just bully opposing players into getting his shot or grabbing the board. Nowadays, you risk a loss of possession and potential free throws for the other team. Kobe Bryant dropped 81 points in 2006 and he was still almost 20 points behind Wilt, which would be a solid game for most players. Dwight Howard is the active leader in career rebounds and he’s still about 8,000 behind Wilt, and nobody has gotten more than 40 PPG for a season this millennium. Wilt’s numbers are safe.

Sports-Bill Russell’s 11 Championships as a Player

And he did it in 13 career seasons. The next closest is Yogi Berra’s 10 with the Yankees and we’re not seeing any dynasties like we saw in the 1950’s and 1960’s when these guys played. For one, both feats were accomplished when their leagues were about half the size that they are now. Plus free agency and salary caps are a thing now and it’s hard to maintain a team that is dominant for such a long stretch of time because pieces are constantly changing. The most titles of a player in any sport in the last 30 years is Michael Jordan’s 6. Russell almost doubled that and he played 2 fewer seasons. In a season that Bill Russell played in, there was an 85% chance he was winning the title. I bitch about the lack of parity in today’s NBA but it was NOTHING compared to the 1960’s when the Celtics won 8 titles in a row. But I probably wouldn’t have bitched about that since I’m a Celtics fan myself. Yeah I’m that type of fan, sue me.

So that’s just a look at just a few records that I don’t think have any chance of falling anytime soon, or ever, for that matter. The way the game has evolved has rendered these marks as untouchable. Let me know if there are other records you can think of that will never be eclipsed in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

 

30 Clubs in 30 Days: Boston Red Sox

Some huge news in the college basketball world as some initial reports have been released regarding current and former players and improper benefits from either schools or agents. The biggest names listed are Michigan State’s Miles Bridges (as if Michigan State needed any more scandals), Alabama’s Colin Sexton, Duke’s Wendell Carter, Markelle Fultz of the 76ers (attended Washington), Kyle Kuzma of the Lakers (attended Utah), and Dennis Smith Jr of the Mavericks (attended NC State). The investigation is still ongoing so I’ll provide more details when more information is released. Also, a big trade was agreed upon between the Kansas City Chiefs and Los Angeles Rams, as the Chiefs are sending star cornerback Marcus Peters to LA for a package of draft picks. This just made an already good Rams defense absolutely terrifying. But today is 30 Clubs in 30 Days and I’m featuring the Boston Red Sox. As I’m sure readers of my blog are well aware, I’m a Red Sox fan, so I apologize if I go a little more in depth with them than other teams. I’m only human. So let’s get a look at the Red Sox’ chances in 2018.

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2017 Results:

Record: 93-69, Won AL East over New York Yankees by 2 games, lost to Houston Astros in ALDS

Notable Offseason Additions: OF JD Martinez

Notable Offseason Subtractions: RP Addison Reed, OF Chris Young, RP Fernando Abad, RP Blaine Boyer, 2B Josh Rutledge, CF Rajai Davis, SP Henry Owens, SP Doug Fister

Best Offensive Player: RF Mookie Betts

Best Pitcher: Chris Sale

Depth Chart:

C-Christian Vazquez, Sandy Leon

1B-Hanley Ramirez, Mitch Moreland

2B-Dustin Pedroia, Eduardo Nunez

3B-Rafael Devers, Deven Marrero

SS-Xander Bogaerts

LF-Andrew Benintendi, Brock Holt

CF-Jackie Bradley Jr

RF-Mookie Betts, JD Martinez (DH)

SP-Chris Sale, David Price, Rick Porcello, Drew Pomeranz, Eduardo Rodriguez, Steven Wright

Bullpen-Craig Kimbrel (CP), Joe Kelly, Matt Barnes, Heath Hembree, Carson Smith, Tyler Thornburg, Austin Maddox, Brandon Workman, Robby Scott

Coaching Staff:

Manager-Alex Cora (1st season with Red Sox)

Hitting Coach-Tim Hyers

Pitching Coach-Dana LeVangie

1st Base Coach-Tom Goodwin

3rd Base Coach-Carlos Febles

Bench Coach-Ron Roenicke

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The Red Sox regressed in a big way offensively in 2017. After scoring the most runs in the American League in 2016, they dropped off significantly and finished dead last in the American League in home runs. For a while, it didn’t look like they were going to do a whole lot to change things other than bring back guys from last year’s team (Mitch Moreland and Eduardo Nunez). That was until they signed JD Martinez to a 5-year $110M deal. I won’t expand too much about his potential role in Boston, as I did so in the blog I just linked. Now they look to get back on track under rookie manager Alex Cora. Here’s a look at how the Red Sox are projected to line up in 2018.

1. Eduardo Nunez/Dustin Pedroia-2B

2. Andrew Benintendi-LF

3. Mookie Betts-RF

4. JD Martinez-DH

5. Xander Bogaerts-SS

6. Hanley Ramirez/Mitch Moreland-1B

7. Rafael Devers-3B

8. Christian Vazquez/Sandy Leon-C

9. Jackie Bradley Jr-CF

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Now on paper that’s a pretty imposing lineup as long as they can return to their 2016 forms because only Christian Vazquez took a step forward at the dish in 2017. It’s an entirely new coaching staff with a different philosophy so it’ll be interesting to see how they do things. Alex Cora stated recently that he doesn’t really get the whole “lefty/lefty righty/righty” conundrum, stating something along the lines of “you’ve been hitting lefties all your life and now all of a sudden you can’t hit lefties when you reach the Majors? Doesn’t make sense to me.” He hasn’t even managed a meaningful game yet and I already love his style. But there is a ton of ability in this lineup if Cora and company can get the most out of it. The young stars have been nicknamed the Killer B’s, consisting of Mookie Betts, Xander Bogaerts, Jackie Bradley Jr, and Andrew Benintendi, all of whom can take over games when teams aren’t careful. Betts is the most dangerous of the bunch, as he was AL MVP runner-up in 2016 and despite taking a step back in 2017, was still their best hitter, batting .264 with 24 home runs, 102 RBI, 26 stolen bases, 32 DRS, and was worth 5.1 WAR. Bogaerts is another talented hitter but he’s also extremely streaky. When he’s hot, he’s impossible to get out. You’ll see 3-4 game after 3-4 game and his batting average will skyrocket up into the .350’s. But when he’s cold, you have to work your ass off to let up a hit to him. In fact, there was a long stretch in the middle of the season where Bogaerts was the worst statistical hitter in baseball. Jackie Bradley is another guy who can be streaky, like Bogaerts, but unlike Bogaerts, Bradley is an excellent defender at a premium position so when he’s not hitting well, he can still make excellent contributions in the field. I listed Bradley as the 9th hitter mainly because he’s had so much success in that position. In fact, it’s been a while since I updated this stat, but last I checked, Bradley was a career .346 hitter when batting 9th. Benintendi was the runner-up for AL Rookie of the Year last season and probably would have won it, too if Aaron Judge didn’t set the rookie record with 52 home runs and finished runner-up for AL MVP. Benintendi hit .271 with 20 home runs, 90 RBI, and 20 stolen bases while playing a solid left field. Another guy the Red Sox have to be excited about is third baseman Rafael Devers. Devers is a bad defender at the hot corner and I think that he’s going to have to eventually switch to either first base or start DH’ing before long. But he shows bat discipline well beyond his years (he turns 22 in October). Watching Devers’ at bats as a youngster, I noticed that he doesn’t try and do his own thing at the plate. He takes what the pitcher gives him and goes with the pitch. For example, he’s not going to try and pull everything. If he’s thrown a curveball low and away, he’ll wait patiently for it to get to him and will send it the other way. He’s a guy I’m really excited for in his first full season in a Red Sox uniform.

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The Red Sox pitching was fantastic in 2017, as they finished 4th in the Majors with a 3.73 team ERA. That was thanks in large part to their trade acquisition of Chris Sale from the Chicago White Sox in the 2017 offseason. Sale was an absolute monster in his first season in a Red Sox uniform, going 17-8 with a 2.90 ERA and 308 strikeouts. He was 5 strikeouts away from tying Pedro Martinez’s franchise record, a record he likely would’ve broken had he been allowed to pitch his last start. However that start came at a time that would’ve affected his ability to start Game 1 of the ALDS so I think then-manager John Farrell made the right move there. David Price was battling injuries throughout the year but he was pretty solid when he was on the mound and even better when he was placed in the bullpen. He finished the year at 6-3 with a 3.38 ERA, which included an ERA of 0.00 in 5 relief appearances. A fully healthy season for Price would be huge for the Red Sox. Rick Porcello had a rough follow-up to his Cy Young-winning 2016 season, as he went 11-17 (most losses in baseball) with a 4.65 ERA. However he is still one of the more talented pitchers on the Red Sox roster and if he can return to form in 2018, that’s three aces at the top of the Red Sox rotation. And that’s without even mentioning Drew Pomeranz, who after a brutal first 2 months of the season, was absolutely terrific for the Sox. In the second half of the season, his ERA was 3.01, bringing his overall line to 17-6 with a 3.32 ERA. Not bad for your fourth starter.

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The Red Sox bullpen is also expected to be very strong, spearheaded by the American League’s Reliever of the Year in Craig Kimbrel. Kimbrel was dynamite in 2017, as he finished with 35 saves, a 1.43 ERA, and a Strikeout per 9 rate of 16.43, which is absolutely ridiculous. Provided Kimbrel can stay healthy, the 9th inning will be a sure thing for the Red Sox. It’s the rest of the bullpen that has some question marks. Joe Kelly had a breakthrough season as a reliever, including throwing the fastest pitch ever by a righty at 103.5 mph and finished with a 2.79 ERA but that was after being in the low 1’s for much of the year. Tyler Thornburg and Carson Smith hope to be big parts of the Red Sox bullpen but both guys are recovering from injuries. Smith was able to appear at the end of the 2017 season and he did pitch pretty well, pitching to a 1.35 ERA in 8 appearances. Thornburg, however, has yet to pitch an inning for the Red Sox after being acquired from the Brewers in the Travis Shaw trade. He was Milwaukee’s closer prior to the trade so he’s another guy the Sox have to be excited for. The Red Sox could potentially have one of the top bullpens in baseball if they can stay healthy.

Overall, I think the Red Sox have a legitimate shot at a World Series. Basically every facet of their team could rank amongst the top 5 in baseball. The problem is going to be getting by the Yankees, who made the biggest move of the offseason when they acquired Giancarlo Stanton in a trade with the Marlins. It’s going to be a fight to the death between those two teams. The return to form of the hitters in this Red Sox lineup will go a long way towards the success of Alex Cora’s first year as manager. If all goes well, this team could win 100 games.

Projected Finish: 95-67, Host AL Wild Card Game against Anaheim Angels

That’s going to do it for Day 5 of 30 Clubs in 30 Days. Join me tomorrow when I discuss the Chicago Cubs, who are looking to win the NL Central for the third straight season and will try and win their second World Series in 3 years. Let me know what you think of the Red Sox’ chances in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

My 2018 Pro Football Hall of Fame Ballot

The Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2018 will be announced during the NFL Honors Show on Saturday night, so I thought it’d be the perfect time to talk about who I would vote for if I had one, which I don’t. A quick thing to note about the rules of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, there’s a minimum of 4 inductees and a max of 7 per year so I’m going to follow those rules.

Ray Lewis-LB-Baltimore Ravens

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Resume: 13x Pro Bowler, 7x All Pro, 2x Defensive Player of the Year, 2x Super Bowl champion, Super Bowl XXXV MVP

Ignoring the murder investigation for which he was never found guilty of, Ray Lewis was one of the greatest middle linebackers of all time. He was knocked for his height and lack of speed coming out of college at Miami (FL) and he made evaluators pay for it by smacking every offensive player he could find in the mouth. He was the stalwart in the middle of the Ravens defense for 17 seasons and was not only the face of the Ravens, but he may have been the face of defense in the NFL. For those too young to remember peak Ray Lewis, he basically was to defense in the early 2000’s what JJ Watt is to defense now. He was that good and he was good well into his late 30’s. He was the definition of what it means to be a bad dude in the NFL.

Terrell Owens-WR-San Francisco 49ers, Philadelphia Eagles, Dallas Cowboys, Buffalo Bills, Cincinnati Bengals

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Resume: 6x Pro Bowler, 5x All Pro, 1078 catches, 15934 yards, 153 TD’s

How T.O. didn’t get in on either of his first two tries is beyond me. In my opinion, after Jerry Rice, he’s the greatest wide receiver of all time. Sure he was also the biggest diva who ever played the position and basically gave wide receivers the diva reputation all by himself (he got some help from Chad Johnson/Ochocinco), but his talent was undeniable. He was bigger, faster, and stronger than every DB he went against and he put up the numbers to show for it. He’s second all-time in receiving yards (though Larry Fitzgerald is right on his tail), he’s eighth in catches, and third in receiving touchdowns. Owens may have been a locker room cancer, but as far as ability and performance goes, there was nobody better.

Randy Moss-WR-Minnesota Vikings, Oakland Raiders, New England Patriots, Tennessee Titans, San Francisco 49ers

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Resume: 6x Pro Bowler, 4x All Pro, 1998 Offensive Rookie of the Year, 982 catches, 15292 receiving yards, 156 TD’s, NFL record 23 receiving TD’s in 2007

After T.O., I think I would put Randy Moss as the third greatest receiver to ever play the game. He set the NFL on fire in 1998 as he formed arguably the greatest receiving duo of all time with Hall of Famer Cris Carter as the two of them helped revive Randall Cunningham’s career and nearly led the Vikings to Super Bowl XXXIII if not for a missed Gary Anderson field goal. He continued to torment opposing secondaries until his trade to the Raiders, where abysmal quarterback play nearly derailed his career. However, a trade to the Patriots and an alliance with Tom Brady resurrected Moss’ career as he set an NFL record with 23 touchdown catches and helped the Patriots to an undefeated regular season in 2007. Moss was a diva, not quite on par with T.O., but he was also one of the most dominant receivers the game has ever seen.

Brian Dawkins-S-Philadelphia Eagles, Denver Broncos

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Resume: 9x Pro Bowler, 4x All Pro, 37 interceptions, 26 sacks

Look up “enforcer” in the dictionary and you’ll get a picture of Brian Dawkins. He’s the gold standard for safeties that will not only get his team absolutely fired up before a game, but then back up that fire by blasting his opponents in the mouth. Dawkins was about as well-rounded a safety as there ever was as not only was he the last guy runningbacks wanted to see coming their way, but he was also a nightmare for quarterbacks as he had excellent coverage skills to boot. If an aspiring safety is smart, he will model his game after Brian Dawkins.

Edgerrin James-RB-Indianapolis Colts, Arizona Cardinals, Seattle Seahawks

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Resume: 4x Pro Bowler, 1x All Pro, 1999 Offensive Rookie of the Year, 3028 carries, 12246 yards, 80 TD’s

When the Colts drafted Edgerrin James 4th overall in 1999 instead of Ricky Williams, people went ballistic. A lot of them had never even heard of James and blasted Bill Polian for taking him over the Heisman-winning Williams, whom Mike Ditka traded his entire draft class to acquire for the Saints. James shut the naysayers up REALLY quick, as he rushed for over 1500 yards as a rookie and over 1700 for an encore performance. While Williams went on to have a solid career, albeit a controversial one, it appears that the Colts had made the right selection, as having James to lean on was critical towards Peyton Manning developing into the second greatest quarterback of all time.

Isaac Bruce-WR-St. Louis Rams, San Francisco 49ers

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Resume: 4x Pro Bowler, Super Bowl XXXIV Champion, 1024 catches, 15208 yards, 91 TD’s

Isaac Bruce may be the most under-appreciated receiver in NFL history. Here’s a guy who finished his career second all time in receiving yards and is a member of the 1000 catch club. Bruce was arguably the best receiver on the Greatest Show on Turf Rams teams from 1999-2001 and I think one of the main reasons he didn’t get the respect he deserved was because of the emergence of the younger Torry Holt. Bruce also was never in the media too often which may be why guys like Terrell Owens and Randy Moss got a lot more publicity than him even though their numbers were comparable. Bruce has already been left out a couple of times already and it’s high time he got the recognition he deserved and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

John Lynch-S-Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Denver Broncos

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Resume: 9x Pro Bowler, 2x All Pro, Super Bowl XXXVII champion

My final Hall of Famer, John Lynch is currently the GM of the 49ers but before that he was one of the greatest safeties to ever play the game. He anchored the great Buccaneers defenses of the late 1990’s and early 2000’s and was a crucial part of their run to a Super Bowl championship in 2002. Like Dawkins, Lynch was a complete safety, who could not only lay the lumber, but was a guy whose zone was often avoided by quarterbacks. And he even became a decent broadcaster in his own right. Lynch really did it all as a safety in the NFL.

I’d be doing an injustice if I didn’t mention that there was one more player that I wanted to include on my unofficial ballot, but I had hit my 7-man maximum so he just missed the cut. Brian Urlacher is also very deserving of enshrinement in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Often rivaling Ray Lewis as to who was the best linebacker of the 2000’s, Urlacher was not only a great physical presence, but he was smart, too, as he was in charge of the playcalling with the defense as far as audibles were concerned. That’s going to do it for my Pro Football Hall of Fame ballot, let me know who you’d choose for enshrinement in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.