College Basketball Has Some New Wrinkles To It

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So the NCAA finally started taking steps in the right direction, albeit imperfectly. They made a few amendments to their player compensation and eligibility rules. Here are the two big changes:

-If an underclassman player goes undrafted in the NBA Draft, they have until the Monday following the draft (about 4 days) to inform their school if they will return and will regain their remaining eligibility, which had been forfeited upon declaration for the draft in years past.

-“Elite” recruits will have the opportunity to sign with NCAA-approved agents.

Now, on the surface, this sounds fantastic. However there are a few kinks that need to be worked out before this can actually become a positive reality. First of all, the NBA has to start allowing players to be drafted out of high school again in order for the agent rule to actually come into effect, which hasn’t happened since Amir Johnson was a second round pick of the Pistons in 2005 (technically 3 players have been drafted since then despite not attending college or playing overseas, however all of them were a year removed from their high school graduation, which is acceptable under the current guidelines). The NCAA will only let players sign with approved agents if they have an opportunity to go to the NBA INSTEAD of the NCAA (the “elite”), which would lead to a bigger decision for the prospect. Go pro now, or go pro later and take some classes? Either way they’ll be making money but they’ll most certainly make more in the NBA, especially given the max contract climate of today’s game. Since players can’t get paid by the university, they’ll only have the endorsement money they get from working with an agent, unlike in the NBA where they’ll get a multi-million-dollar salary on top of those same endorsement deals. It doesn’t change too much but it is a step in the right direction.

However the part I have the most issue with is the term “elite” when talking about which players are allowed to do endorsement deals. Referring to someone as “elite” is about as subjective as you can get and the NCAA has defined this as being players selected by USA Basketball. There’s just one problem: the NCAA announced this without consulting USA Basketball or the NBA, who are reportedly pissed off that the NCAA is throwing these responsibilities on them without their approval. So should the rule come into effect, USA Basketball will have to pick the players who get to sign with agents and those who don’t. And I guarantee you any guy they snub is going to be PISSED, which will just create more tension than there already is amongst the very good players. I don’t understand why everyone can’t just sign with an agent. Besides, what kind of guidelines would they have to put forth? Does the player have to be a 5-star recruit, which is already extremely subjective and not always a great predictor of success? So in that case, using ESPN’s star system, Marvin Bagley would get to sign with an agent but Shai Gilgeous-Alexander can’t (he graded as an 89, 1 point away from being a 5-star player). Plus, if that was the case, only about 30 players would’ve gotten to sign with an agent from last year’s class and only around half of them actually got drafted this year.

Also, the verbiage of the agent having to be “approved by the NCAA” seems kind of fishy. A part of me wonders if they’ll only allow players to sign endorsement deals as long as the agent works into the contract that the NCAA gets a cut as well. It does not sit well whatsoever with me and I’d have to see what one of the contracts looks like before I feel comfortable with that. I understand you don’t want a fishy agent representing 18 year-old kids, but you also don’t want a clean agent to be in the NCAA’s back pocket.

The idea that would allow undrafted college basketball players with unused eligibility to return to school is a damn good one and should’ve been in place a long time ago. The 4-day time period to inform their school of their decision feels a little short, however it may become up to the player to consider the possibility of not getting drafted longer and force them to ponder what they would want to do should they not hear their name called by Adam Silver. Maybe they’d prefer to sign as a 2-way undrafted free agent. Maybe they’d prefer to play overseas instead. But at least they’ll have the option to play college hoops again even though the draft didn’t work out yet and refine their skills. It’s better than the alternative, which is putting these kids at a crossroads. I’m sure a lot of them would choose to go back to college and continue to not only play basketball, but continue their degree.

How long these rules take to make it to college football and other college sports is unknown but if these new rules the NCAA has put out are any indication, they’re going to need to work out the kinks before they’re ready to really compensate these players.

Let me know what you think of the new rules in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

Is There Any Punishment More Pointless than Vacating Wins?

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Not that I can think of. That’s going to do it for today’s blog let me know what you think of it in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

 

 

 

Oh…I guess you wanted something a little more…in depth. Fine. Well as you may remember (or not, because I certainly forgot there was an issue), Notre Dame just received their punishment for a cheating scandal from the 2012-13 seasons after an appeal they made back in 2016. That’s the judicial process for you. The punishment? Their 2012-13 seasons never happened. The NCAA vacated all 21 of their wins in those two seasons, which included an appearance in the BCS National Championship game after the 2012 season where they lost to Alabama. Allegedly what happened was a student athletic trainer gave improper benefits to 8 football players. More specifically, he did a significant amount of schoolwork for 2 players and gave impermissible aid to 6 others. So because an athletic trainer helped these kids cheat on their homework, the NCAA gets to say that their championship run didn’t happen which is just ridiculous. Now, based on a couple of articles I’ve read, we were not provided the names of the specific players involved in the cheating scandal, however it is noted that of the guys involved in the scandal, three of the eight players involved played while they should have been ineligible and of those three, one played in the National Championship.

Now, I’m more than willing to admit that I don’t have any perfect ideas for how to fix this, but there has to be a better way to go about things. Since the players involved had already moved on from the program prior to the NCAA’s investigation, it doesn’t really make sense for them to punish them since it won’t affect the program. But trying to tell the public that two seasons didn’t happen? Give me a break. College football fans aren’t stupid, unless they root for Purdue. It’s not like WWE where you can retcon certain things to fit the storylines you want to tell. This is college football where legacies and stats matter and fans don’t forget so easily. The 2012 season completely reinvigorated Notre Dame football and brought them back to relevance after years of being totally mediocre under Charlie Weis. You’re not going to make people forget so easily. So what punishment is there? Because I’m not trying to sit here and say there shouldn’t be some sort of retribution. Cheating on your schoolwork isn’t fair to the rest of the students/athletes that put in the work to get their education. But punishing the university isn’t fair to the players who were abiding by the rules by trying to devalue their efforts and it’s not fair to the coaches whose legacies and reputations could be tarnished because some guys decided to take shortcuts. The punishments should only apply to the people involved.  But you can’t exactly retroactively fine these guys because they weren’t paid by the university in the first place. I do have one idea for a punishment, though.

Revoke their degree. I know it sounds harsh and may not even be do-able, as I don’t know how this stuff works with degrees (or anything for that matter, since a miscommunication with my adviser is likely going to result in me graduating later than expected), but hear me out. They didn’t do the work themselves, so the credits that they had towards graduation in which these classes were cheated in should be taken away. They’d have to retake the courses at a community college because from what I understand about cheating, that’s pretty much going to get you kicked out of college. So I’d totally get it if they wanted to say “you’re not welcome back here.” A retroactive expulsion, if you will. Now of course, this is imperfect. It’s entirely possible that the players involved in the cheating scandal declared early for the NFL Draft and wouldn’t have their degree anyway. The credits could still be taken away, but I really don’t have an answer to the issue of players that didn’t have their degree anyway. You could probably just say they’re not welcome at the school anymore, which could be huge for some guys as college pride is still a big thing, especially at a university like Notre Dame. At least with this, only the offenders are punished and not the entire program.

It just sucks to see the NCAA take away wins because not only is it not a real punishment because non-Purdue college football fans aren’t stupid.  But also because it tarnishes legacies. If Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly were to be up for induction into the college football Hall of Fame, they wouldn’t be allowed to include the 2012 run as part of his credentials because some dumb kids decided they’d cheat and they just got caught too late. Like how is that fair to anyone? And don’t even get me started on the whole vacating awards because Reggie Bush won the 2005 Heisman Trophy and there’s nothing you can do or say to convince me otherwise. Yet the NCAA vacated it because he took some money to help his family that was living in poverty. The NCAA is just deciding to let these things happen without trying to come up with a better solution and it’s really frustrating to me that we’ve been dealing with these issues for so long and they still haven’t been able to come up with anything. Sure my revocation of degrees isn’t perfect, but I think it at least gives a little more fairness to the people who didn’t have anything to do with the situation.

That’s going to do it for today’s blog. Happy Valentine’s Day, I’m going to spend mine with my true love, Riley Reid. That’s the life of a blogger for you. Let me know if you have any ideas about how to deal with the NCAA’s retroactive punishment issues in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10. I also accept valentines. It gets lonely in my creepy poorly-lit apartment.

Things I Prefer Over the Pro Bowl

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For those who have followed my blog, you may know that I hate the Pro Bowl. It’s a great idea in theory, but there is so much risk involved for a pointless game that it really defeats the purpose. Just ask Bengals tight end Tyler Eifert, who hasn’t been the same since he injured his hip at the Pro Bowl a couple years ago. Plus, to try and protect players, they’ve neutered the rules so much that they’ve taken out some of the more exciting elements of football, such as blitzes and complex schemes (at least, they’re exciting to ME, that is). I’ve literally seen a Pro Bowl where the players went a couple of plays as if it were their walkthroughs. It’s bad. It’s not even in Hawaii this year, which takes away a lot of the incentive to actually attend the game for these players. So let’s take a look at a few things that are more enjoyable for me than this awful game.

1. WWE’s Royal Rumble

This one’s not really a joke, I genuinely love this event, and it’ll be on at the same time as the Pro Bowl so automatically you’ll get better TV, provided you’re willing to shell out the money for this Pay Per View. Nobody illegally streams anyway, that’s definitely not the better route to go.

2. My Own Birth

At least with this I’ll get to watch and see for myself if I came into the world exactly how my mom says I did: ass first.

3. 2 Girls 1 Cup

I don’t feel human emotions when I watch the Pro Bowl. I did feel the very real human emotion of disgust the one time I watched this.

4. Jar Jar Binks

I’ve seen the theories that he’s actually a Sith lord. It’s not as farfetched as you might think. In fact, it could’ve been that Jar Jar was going to be an inverse of Yoda, someone who appears to be “goofy” at first but it’s just an act. Unfortunately for the Star Wars prequels, it was executed SO poorly.

5. Any “Vine Star’s” Youtube Channel

Except maybe that Retro Spectro guy. Other than that, guys like Logan and Jake Paul deserve my eyes more than the Pro Bowl does, and that’s saying a lot considering the heat Logan’s (deservedly) going through.

6. People Arguing About Politics

Like I said at #3, I don’t feel human emotions when I watch the Pro Bowl. I feel anger when I watch people argue about politics. Nobody respects anyones opinion anymore, they just try to talk over each other and be the loudest in the room.

7. People Getting “Triggered” Over the Slightest Thing

It’s one thing if you had a genuinely traumatic experience. But if somebody makes a joke about being OCD and you get offended by it, go fuck yourself. It’s probably not nearly as offensive as the Pro Bowl.

8. This MLB Offseason

At least I’ll be able to get some things done while nothing happens in baseball.

9. Sportscenter the 6

God that show makes me cringe sometimes.

10. People Bitching about the new Star Wars Movies

They’re good movies. Unfortunately in this day and age, if there’s a single flaw with these movies, that makes them bad in the eyes of the “fans.”

11. People Bitching about the Game of Thrones Scenes that don’t Coincide with the Books

We get it, you read the books. I read them too. There’s some stuff in the books that sucks too, get your nose out of the sky.

12. Amy Schumer stand-up

This one might be a little harsh, I’m sorry Pro Bowl, that was a low blow.

13. The First Few Episodes of Friends

I love the Friends series. But my God the first few episodes are painfully unfunny. Once the story gets going, though, the humor really picks up.

14. The How I Met Your Mother Ending

I don’t know if I’ve ever felt more betrayed by a series finale. Luckily, if you skip the last episode, you actually do have some solid closure since you basically know everything that happened by that point.

15. People Who Debate LeBron James vs Michael Jordan

This is mainly due to how over-saturated the argument has become. It’s really obnoxious and I’d rather wait until LeBron’s career is over before I really get involved with the debate.

16. ‘Let’s Play’ Videos

The only time I’ll watch a Let’s Play video is if I’m considering buying a video game and I want to see if I’d like it. Otherwise these things are almost as pointless as the Pro Bowl.

17. New Simpsons Episodes

It’s really a shell of its former self, but that’s beating a dead horse at this point. I read somewhere that they’re ending after 30 seasons, but I don’t remember where I heard that or if it’s even true.

18. Feminazis

I’m all for equal rights for women, believe me. But there are some who take the movement so far that they give a bad name to people who are actually trying to make positive change. I’ve got no issue with feminists. It’s feminazis where I take issue.

19. People Who Don’t Follow Baseball Saying it’s Boring

Baseball can be slow at times, I’ll admit. But if you’re going to bitch about it, you’re not doing anybody a favor. Baseball is a thinking man’s game.

20. People Who Go To Comments Sections to Bitch About How they don’t like a Video or Article or any other Content

Thankfully I have yet to experience such a thing, but I’ll read comments sections for other things and whenever I read someone who says “this sucks,” I think to myself “then why are you watching/reading?” Just don’t consume it, it’s really not that difficult.

21. Trigonometry

This shit almost kept me out of college. It’s pretty much only useful if I want to measure the size of a mountain, which I don’t. I’ll just take peoples’ word for it.

22. NCAA’s Pay-for-Play Issue

Just let the kids do endorsement deals for Christ’s sake. Still not as big a mess as the Pro Bowl, though.

23. Reality TV

Shows like “Keeping up with the Kardashians,” “Jersey Shore,” and “The Bachelor/ette” do almost as much damage to the human brain as the Pro Bowl.

24. Hiking

It’s just walking up a hill. I mean I’ll gladly do it if my friends invite me, but it’s pretty low on my to-do list.

25. Any other Sport’s All Star Game

Baseball, basketball, and probably hockey (I wouldn’t know, I’ve never caught an NHL All Star Game) at least have some form of entertainment to them. MLB’s is a traditional baseball game while the NBA’s doesn’t care about defense and players go out of their way to do highlight plays.

And finally, things I’d rather watch the Pro Bowl over.

1. Get Kidney Stones

This is probably my biggest fear. If you gave me the choice of watching hundreds of hours of Pro Bowl footage and never get a kidney stone, or get just one kidney stone and never watch the Pro Bowl, I would choose the former every time.

And that’s it. Let me know what you like better than the Pro Bowl in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10. I’m starting to give up on my Patreon account because none of you are donating to it. Except my dad. Thanks, Dad!

My Problem With the NCAA

So first of all, congratulations to Baker Mayfield for winning the Heisman Trophy. Easily the most deserving player and he did it as a former walk-on. Truly a feat for the ages. That being said, San Diego State’s Rashaad Penny finished fifth in voting after a fantastic season, rushing for over 2000 yards and 19 scores. Penny may have done this for free, but his coach Rocky Long received a $10,000 bonus because Penny made first team All American. So the schools can’t pay their players for their performance, but they can pay their coaches for that player’s performance. Explain to me why that’s fair. Now to set the record straight, Long is a Hell of a coach. San Diego State is perennially among the best non-Power 5 teams in the country and it’s amazing some high-profile school hasn’t tried to sign him away yet (or maybe they have and he’s just turned them down, I don’t know. Wouldn’t surprise me, San Diego is one of my favorite cities and he’s probably in a really good situation there). He’s not the only coach with contract stipulations like this. Texas Tech’s Kliff Kingsbury would receive a quarter of a million dollars if a Red Raider won the Heisman. Those are the only ones I’m aware of but I guarantee you those aren’t the only coaching bonuses in the NCAA for individual player performances.

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The problems start at the top with NCAA head Mark Emmert. This guy makes Roger Goodell look like Yoda in how incompetent he can be at times. This is an unedited quote from Emmert after Lavar Ball pulled LiAngelo from UCLA to “better prepare” him for the NBA:

Is this a part of someone being part of your university as a student-athlete or is it about using college athletics to prepare yourself to be a pro? If it’s the latter, you shouldn’t be there in the first place

So what he’s trying to say is if a player uses college athletics as a stepping stone to go pro, then he shouldn’t be in college in the first place.

This is possibly the worst thing he could have said regarding the whole LiAngelo Ball situation. For a lot of athletes, it’s go pro or bust and they kind of have to prepare that way because they can be cut and lose their scholarship at any time. Being a student, as many of us probably know, is a full-time job. Being a Division 1 collegiate athlete is also a full-time job. So as a student-athlete, these kids are basically balancing two full-time jobs and they can’t receive any compensation for either unless they do make it in the pros, which for most sports isn’t really an option. Hell, NCAA has a tagline that reads “there are over X-number of student athletes and almost all of them will go pro in something other than sports.” By saying what Emmert said, you’re basically devaluing the work a lot of athletes deliver for their schools.

The fact that schools can make millions off of these kids’ performances and get away with not allowing the kids to make any sort of money off their own play is criminal. But the NCAA has put themselves in basically the perfect situation with their defense: “we don’t pay them because they’re amateurs, they’re amateurs because we don’t pay them.” It’s so simple yet it pretty much makes any athlete trying to make money shit out of luck.

Now to be fair to the universities, there will be a huge problem if it becomes mandated that the schools have to pay the athletes: they would have to pay ALL of the athletes. Not just the revenue-generating sports of football and men’s basketball. I mean gymnastics, swimming, water polo, you name it, all have to get paid, otherwise you’re going to create huge problems within your school. Let’s look at Title IX for a moment. Now yes, Title IX was a great innovation that gave women equal opportunities to receive an education and be treated like their male counterparts. But the problem with Title IX was that for every collegiate sport men had, women had to get as well (it’s a little more complicated than that, but that’s the dumbed down version I’m going with). Well whenever a school wants to install a new sport, they need money to pay for uniforms, equipment, a field, coaches, etc. The schools already had lots of money poured into the revenue generators and would need to come up with even more money to accommodate the women. One thing they could have done was try and more evenly distribute the funds dedicated to each sport. But how can a school like Alabama cut down their funding for football when it is probably the biggest attraction the school has to offer? How do you tell a guy like Nick Saban you have to pay him less than what his contract says so that the girls can play volleyball (don’t worry, I’ll get into coach salaries soon)? So what did the schools do? They started cutting male sports and using the funds that had been dedicated to them and repurposing them for the new women’s sports. Wrestling got hit particularly hard by this because let’s face it, outside of staged wrestling, how many women do you really see get into the sport? You can probably count them on one hand, if at all. So many schools cut different male programs and put thousands of students out of a scholarship, possibly killing their chances at a degree and potential career after sports. If the NCAA mandated that the schools had to pay the athletes, I guarantee a similar thing would happen.

One argument I keep hearing in favor of not paying players is that they are paid: with a full ride to college. That’s not 100% accurate. Really only the best of the best get a full ride, the Marvin Bagley’s and Saquon Barkley’s of the world. I’ve talked with several athletes around campus at Indiana who are only on partial scholarship. And don’t even get me started on the walk-ons who have to pay in full, which Baker Mayfield was. Plus, as I mentioned before, players can get cut and in many cases, lose their scholarship, which for many athletes was their one real ticket into college in the first place. Hell, I’ve been paid for my broadcasts with the Big Ten Network’s Student U program and I had about as much to do with the game I’m calling as the guy scalping tickets in the parking lot. If I were to do play-by-play with a current student athlete and they were to get paid to do the same job I just did, that would be an NCAA violation and they could get the school in big trouble even though it’s the Big Ten Network that handles the salary (I think, I’m not 100% sure on that, I kind of just blindly filled out some paperwork to get on payroll).

Another thing I keep seeing is people saying sarcastically “there’s no money to pay the players” when a coach gets signed to a lucrative contract. It kind of goes back to the line about amateurism I referenced before. There isn’t the money for athletes because they pay the coaches so much, they pay coaches so much because there isn’t money for athletes. Not quite the same, but it now puts them in a bind because there is as much as $9 million before incentives (Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh) dedicated towards a single head coach. Now I’m sure there are plenty of coaches who would gladly cut their salaries so that their guys can make money, but that’s just not fair to ask of them. Because you’re paying them so much, they’re now accustomed to a certain life style. Granted, a college football coach probably doesn’t get to bask in that money a whole lot because they’re always on the road either recruiting or coming up with gameplans, but the schools have created this roadblock in coaching salaries that makes it nearly impossible to pay players what they’re worth, which is a ton considering how much money sports can rake in for a university.

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Which brings me to my next point, how much money a university actually profits. It turns out, most schools actually don’t turn a profit from college athletics and are actually operating at a deficit. It’s the major schools such as Texas that actually turn profits. While a school like Texas could probably afford to pay their players (their athletic department rakes in over $180 million a year as of 2016, according to Business Insider), a smaller school such as Ball State can’t. So that creates another conundrum, especially considering players can’t just become free agents and seek larger markets to get a bigger salary for their performance like they can in the pros. Once you pick your school, you’re basically stuck there for three to four years. The only form of leaving is transferring and by NCAA rules you have to sit out an entire season if you do. It also becomes tricky as to how much you should pay each player and whether or not athletes in one sport make more than athletes in another. There are a whole lot of logistical problems surrounding all of this that there’s really only one viable solution that I can come up with in which everybody wins.

Allow players to sign with agents and make money off their own name on their own time. No money has to come out of the pockets of the athletic departments, they can keep paying their coaches their ridiculous sums (Harbaugh makes more than all NFL head coaches) and the players can use their performance to make some money. Now yes, football players and basketball players will likely receive more phone calls than water polo players. But I guarantee you there will be some money to be made from local businesses, such as sporting goods stores, that would love to feature a softball player in their ads and whatnot. The only real concern would be potentially shady agents taking advantage of kids who might not know any better. My response to that is that if the NCAA cares as much about the student athlete as they claim to, then monitor these actions. Have all contracts go through the NCAA offices and be approved by an NCAA official before allowing it to go through so that an athlete isn’t being taken advantage of. I haven’t really heard any horror stories about agents taking advantage of their professional clients, so I doubt this really would become a problem. The shadiest thing I’ve heard is Emmanuel Sanders signed with the Broncos while his agent agreed to a deal with the Chiefs a few years back, which sounds more like a miscommunication than anything. But otherwise I never hear about any real issues regarding agents and their clients. I see no reason why these players can’t make money off their name and likeness. Plus if that happens, then I’ll get my NCAA video games back, which I’ve missed terribly since they were discontinued following the 2013 season. Which really is the important thing here.

Should players be paid by the universities? Should players be allowed to sign with agents and do endorsement deals? Is the current system fine with you? Let me know in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10 and contribute to my Patreon. Also, sorry for not posting yesterday. It’s Finals Week at IU and I’ve been pretty busy. I’m going to try and continue my normal posting routine this week, but if I break off of it, it’s because I’ve got exams to worry about.

 

Rick Pitino, from legend to unemployment line

Yesterday, it was revealed that several people affiliated with NCAA schools and athletic apparel companies were facing federal charges of bribery to push student athletes towards certain agents and clothing companies. Among the arrested were assistant coaches at Auburn (Chuck Person), Oklahoma State (Lamont Evans), Arizona (Emanuel “Book” Richardson), and USC (Tony Bland). James Gatto, director of global sports marketing at Adidas, Christian Dawkins, a former NBA agent, and many more were also arrested. But what seems to be the biggest story coming out of this is “University-6,” as this “mysterious” school is referred to in the document, which, based on the descriptions about the school that are given, is pretty clearly Louisville. Louisville apparently funneled around $100K to the family of 5-star basketball recruit Brian Bowen, who signed with the team in June.

The results of this investigation have, as of a couple of hours ago, led to the firing of legendary basketball coach Rick Pitino and Louisville AD Tom Jurich. Pitino is a 2-time national championship-winning head coach (Kentucky in 1996, Louisville in 2013) and is widely considered to be one of the top coaches in college basketball today. Under Pitino, Kentucky returned to its former glory until he signed a deal to become the head coach of the Boston Celtics, a tenure that was a complete and utter failure, one that was hard to envision him coming back from until he returned to prominence at Louisville. But Pitino’s career was loaded with scandal and, quite frankly, I am absolutely shocked he has lasted this long. From the incident with Karen Sypher, to the hookers for recruits, and now this, Pitino has had a history of questionable decisions. Yet he still remained on at Louisville. After the incident with the prostitute parties for recruits, I figured Pitino had to be done for at Louisville. But he was only suspended for 5 games and Louisville was put on probation. It is this probation, however, that has caused some people to ask the dreaded question: is Louisville basketball headed for the death penalty?

My quick answer to that? No. While you can’t receive the death penalty unless you already are on probation, which Louisville was, there is a reason that only SMU football in the late 80’s has received the death penalty from the NCAA: there’s too much money at stake for there to be an entire season of no Louisville basketball. And that’s really what it all comes down to: money. Despite the fact that the NCAA is a “non-profit” organization, money is going to be what keeps Louisville playing, however the program will be set back YEARS when the NCAA finally hands out a punishment. You can already bank on Louisville being ineligible for the postseason for multiple years and losing several scholarships.

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Rick Pitino gets angry during a Louisville basketball game. (photo credit: Kentucky Sports Radio)

So what do you do if you’re Louisville? Well, you won’t be a basketball blue-blood for the foreseeable future, that’s for damn sure. But the fact of the matter is Louisville needs a new head coach. There’s one name that immediately comes to mind: Tom Crean. Crean has done this before, he brought Indiana out of the depths of hell in the aftermath of the Kelvin Sampson era and quite frankly, he didn’t get the respect he deserved while at the helm for the Hoosiers. Indiana was in a similar situation back in the mid-2000’s that Louisville finds itself in now. Sampson had provided improper benefits to Eric Gordon and the program got put on probation for several years. Would Crean take the job? I’m not so sure. He’s a stand-up guy, but I doubt he’d want to get back in the rebuilding entire programs business after the lack of respect he got from a lot of IU fans. If I’m Crean, I would wait for something a little more stable. But no doubt Louisville will come calling.

We may have seen the last of Rick Pitino, however. If you are someone who can’t live in a world where he isn’t patrolling the hardwood, fear not. His son, Rich, is head coach at Minnesota.