Politics is Once Again Interfering With My Football

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This is more of a two-part thing since their are two stories I wanted to divulge into today that have some sort of political connection. The first, of course, being that the NFL made it mandatory to stand for the National Anthem before games. However, they are giving players the option to remain in the locker room for it. But if you are not standing prior to kickoff, fines could be in store for both players and the organization they play for. The NFL Players Association stated that they were not consulted about this decision prior to it being made, suggesting that this was a one-sided deal.

I talked about this a while back, in fact it was one of my very first blogs on this site. But I’ll give you a little reminder of my feelings about kneeling in saying that I used to think it was just a publicity stunt by Colin Kaepernick to get himself back in the spotlight until I saw the effect it was having on his fellow players. I have no problem with nonviolent protests, which is what the kneeling is. It’s protesting what they feel are injustices against the black community, particularly as it pertains to police brutality. I understand where people who think it is disrespectful to the flag are coming from, really, I do. But NFL owners have ZERO business telling players they can’t peacefully protest. They’re not hurting the product on the field since the protests happen before the opening kickoff so it’s not like they’re affecting the on-field product. The anthem is often not televised so it’s not like people at home would know if the media didn’t blow a big siren every time a player did.

But this ruling appears to be final and I guarantee you there will be some guys who will want to invoke their right to free speech. The basics will likely be some guys will still be out there and will raise the Black Power Fist. However I also feel it will be very likely that some creative forms of protest may arise as a way of fighting back. NFL players aren’t robots, they have personalities and feelings and they’re not morons. They will find a way to make their voices heard and I whole-heartedly encourage that. NFL players have as much right to free speech as everybody else in America. The NFL has no business impeding a First Amendment right at any time. It’s less “American” than any type of nonviolent protest these players are doing.

Other politics stuff, Donald Trump claims that the Department of Justice was spying on him or something along those lines. Why do I care about this? Well Trump has a name for this: Spygate.

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This just proves that Trump doesn’t actually watch football and was just getting mad about the anthem protests to try and up his approval rating. For those who weren’t watching football in 2007 or anything related to the New England Patriots since then, Spygate was when the Patriots had a camera on the sideline against the New York Jets in Week 1 of the 2007 season that was a violation of a relatively new set of rules and cost the Patriots a first round draft pick and about a million dollars in combined fines. I mean, it’s only dogged the Patriots for the last 10 years or so and the accusing party, the New York Jets, are kind of the team of the city you’ve been staying in for most of your life so you’re bound to have heard the expression somewhere at some point in passing. But apparently not. Well if that’s the case, Mr. Trump, if you would like the rights to Spygate, I suggest talking to Mr. Goodell and see if the Patriots can get one of their two first round picks in 2008 back? So that the Pats can use it on that Kansas State wide receiver Jordy Nelson, or that Tulane runningback Matt Forte. Or even that Texas runningback Jamaal Charles. He seems like he could become a pretty good back with the right coaching. That would be nice.

So yeah, politics don’t mesh well for me. Stay the Hell out. Let me know what you think of these political sports happenings in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

General Sports: May 18

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-49ers linebacker Reuben Foster seems to be on the fast track to getting cleared of all charges. A little while ago, Foster allegedly assaulted his girlfriend so badly that he ruptured her ear drum and the charges he was facing could potentially land him in prison for up to 11 years. Well the “victim” gave her testimony where she basically stated that Foster never hit her and that she was actually the one who hit him (with a coat hanger) and that she wanted to “end him.” Now there is a possibility that she was paid “hush money” but I’m the type of person who will believe otherwise until it is proven to be true. But if the girlfriend did fabricate the story to try and derail Foster’s career, then quite frankly I’m sickened. Not only is she essentially trying to destroy an innocent man’s life, but she’s also making it harder for real victims to step forward. The reason there are people who will question victims of domestic assault is because of people like this chick who fabricate stories out of revenge. As long as people like this exist, there will people who will question the legitimacy of other assault victims and that’s just heartbreaking. That’s all I’m going to go into on the matter. It’s a sports blog.

-The Cleveland Browns have been chosen as this year’s Hard Knocks team and quite frankly, I’m kind of excited. It’s going to be risky choosing a team that’s coming off an 0-16 season but the Browns made so many moves in the offseason that they legitimately look like they could be halfway decent in 2018. There are also some legitimate personalities and some interesting storylines to boot. You can already tell that Baker Mayfield and Josh Gordon are going to be the stars of this show simply for their pasts and personalities. Hue Jackson, I feel, is going to be hit or miss. He’s been on Hard Knocks before as a runningbacks coach with the Bengals and he wasn’t that memorable so I’m interested to see if there’s going to be anything out of him. The best parts of these types of shows are coaches with personalities, which is a big reason why the 2010 Jets edition is pretty much unanimously considered to be the best season of Hard Knocks. Todd Haley and Gregg Williams are Offensive and Defensive Coordinators, respectively, so if Jackson doesn’t bring the energy to the show, these two will. The Browns were an excellent choice by HBO.

-So it’s the middle of May and at the top of the NL East Standings are the Atlanta Braves and Philadelphia Phillies, separated by just a game. What the Hell is going on out here? With Atlanta, it’s been the young guns, particularly Ozzie Albies, who is absolutely DESTROYING the ball through a month and a half, slashing .283/.320/.598 with 13 home runs and 31 RBI. His 13 home runs place him in a 6-way tie for the MLB lead and he leads the NL with 40 runs scored (next closest is Charlie Blackmon and Chris Taylor with 31). And he’s just 21 years old. Then there’s Ronald Acuna, who has picked up right where he left off after a big Spring Training, slashing .275/.348/.500 in his first 20 games. He’s 20 years old. These guys have lit a spark in this Atlanta lineup and it helps that Nick Markakis is having a HUGE year, slashing .333/.408/.518. Markakis hasn’t been relevant since 2014 so his presence on this Atlanta ball club has been huge for their turnaround. As for the Phillies, it seems like so long ago that Gabe Kapler was reportedly on the hot seat just 6 games into his big league tenure. Since toning it down after a rough first couple series, the Phillies have quietly been near the top of pretty much all major categories and are playing damn good baseball despite the fact that their prize offseason acquisition, Carlos Santana, is batting a measly .192. If the season were to end today, both clubs would make the playoffs. Might I remind you that these two teams finished in the cellar of the division last year. Crazy what difference a year can make.

-The Carolina Panthers are set to be bought by David Tepper, a hedge fund billionaire for $2.275 billion. This is a record purchase of an NFL franchise, eclipsing the $1.4 billion mark set by the Pegulas when they purchased the Buffalo Bills a few years ago. P Diddy, Steph Curry, and Colin Kaepernick all expressed interest in purchasing the Panthers when they went up for sale after sexual harassment allegations arose against now-former owner Jerry Richardson. But it’s going to be Tepper, a guy who I know literally nothing about except for what I read on an NFL.com article. But apparently he takes credit for coining the phrase “it is what it is,” which if that’s the case then I probably owe him some kind of royalties. Tepper does have experience in ownership to a degree, as he previously held a 5% stake in the Pittsburgh Steelers, which he will now have to sell. So it’ll be interesting to see if there’s some kind of culture change in Carolina.

That’s going to do it for this edition of General Sports, let me know what you think of the topics discussed in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

Each Team’s Biggest Draft Bust in the 21st Century

We rave about these prospects as “can’t miss” or “once in a lifetime” type players come Draft season. But every year, without fail, somebody taken in the first round fails to live up to expectations. I’m going to take a look at each team’s biggest blunder since 2000 to remind everyone to humble themselves when it comes to getting excited about your team’s first round pick. Some things to take note of when it comes to my rules for this list: First rounders only, the 2017 draft class is excluded since we really don’t know shit about them yet (Hell, Jared Goff was looking like a colossal bust after his first season. Look what happened there), and we are only considering a player’s success with the team that drafted them. So for example, Cedric Benson is a bust candidate even though he had a successful stint with the Bengals. He was drafted by the Bears, where he was awful. Draft position also matters here. The first overall pick’s bust status is going to weigh more than the 32nd overall pick’s status, even if the 32nd pick was a way worse player. I’ll also be noting some players that played the same position as the bust in question that were taken later who had much more successful careers to add salt to the wound.

Cleveland Browns-Courtney Brown-EDGE-Penn State (1st Overall in 2000)

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The first pick of the millennium, Brown was a freak of nature athlete and, to be fair to the Browns, judging by the body of work at Penn State and his physical traits, it’s really hard to blame them for taking Brown. He was basically Myles Garrett before Myles Garrett. While Garrett looks like a budding star if he can stay healthy, Brown notched just 17 sacks in his 5 years with the Browns, never eclipsing 4.5 in a season. There were definitely worse players the Browns have taken (probably the most misses in the NFL since their revival in 1999), but Brown was the only one that went first overall.

Who they could’ve had: John Abraham-South Carolina, Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila-San Diego State

New York Giants-Ereck Flowers-OT-Miami (FL) (9th Overall in 2015)

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Flowers’ huge frame made him enticing to the Giants, however he’s been one of the worst tackles in the game, as he was rushed into the starting role before he was ready and it showed. Every Giants fan I know consistently calls for his head and it doesn’t help him that the Giants just signed Nate Solder to a huge contract.

Who they could’ve had: Andrus Peat-Stanford, DJ Humphries-Florida

New York Jets-Vernon Gholston-EDGE-Ohio State (6th Overall in 2008)

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Gholston was a genetic freak but that didn’t translate whatsoever to the NFL, as he recorded as many sacks as I did in the NFL: Zero (I had 2 sacks in high school but I guess that doesn’t count). Anytime I see a rookie get their first NFL sack, I think to myself “better pick than Gholston.”

Who they could’ve had: Calais Campbell-Miami (FL), William Hayes-Winston-Salem State, Erik Walden-Middle Tennessee State, Cliff Avril-Purdue

Houston Texans-Travis Johnson-DL-Florida State (16th Overall in 2005)

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A lot of people will want to say David Carr for this pick, but to be fair to the guy, he played behind what was statistically the worst offensive line of all time. Carr got sacked an NFL record 76 times as a rookie and that destroyed his confidence and he never recovered. Travis Johnson was an okay player for the Texans, but he wasn’t worth the 16th overall pick. He was out of the league by 2011. There really aren’t that many busts in the Texans’ short history (since 2002).

Who they could’ve had: Jonathan Babineaux-Iowa

Denver Broncos-Paxton Lynch-QB-Memphis (26th Overall in 2016)

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You know it’s bad when you can’t beat out the 7th rounder your team took the year before for the starting job. We knew Lynch would need time to develop, but even now that he has an opportunity, the Broncos are already looking to move on. He’s only made 4 starts in his NFL career and has thrown just 4 TD’s.

Who they could’ve had: Jacoby Brissett-North Carolina State, Dak Prescott-Mississippi State

Indianapolis Colts-Bjoern Werner-EDGE-Florida State (24th Overall in 2013)

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Werner was this big European guy that everybody was foaming at the mouth over with his potential. However he lasted just 3 NFL seasons and recorded just 6.5 sacks in only 16 starts before getting cut by the Colts. He was not picked up elsewhere.

Who they could’ve had: Alex Okafor-Texas, William Gholston-Michigan State

Tampa Bay Buccaneers-Mark Barron-S-Alabama (7th Overall in 2012)

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Barron was a nightmare in coverage with the Buccaneers and lasted just 2 and a half seasons in Tampa before being shipped to the Rams. Since joining the Rams, though, they moved him to linebacker and he has been decent in his new role. At bare minimum he starts for one of the deadliest defenses in the league.

Who they could’ve had: Harrison Smith-Notre Dame, Coty Sensabaugh-Clemson, Robert Blanton-Notre Dame, George Iloka-Boise State

Chicago Bears-Kevin White-WR-West Virginia (7th Overall in 2015)

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I hate calling guys who can’t stay healthy “busts” because it’s not always their fault, but White has played just 5 games since being the 7th overall pick in 2015. It’s just one serious injury after another with this guy. It’s hard to overlook.

Who they could’ve had: DeVante Parker-Louisville, Nelson Agholor-USC, Devin Funchess-Michigan, Tyler Lockett-Kansas State, Jamison Crowder-Duke, Stefon Diggs-Maryland

San Francisco 49ers-AJ Jenkins-WR-Illinois (30th Overall in 2012)

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I was scratching my head when the 49ers made this pick (I had Jenkins as a 4th rounder) and he did nothing to dispel my confusions. Jenkins lasted just 1 year with the 49ers before being traded to the Chiefs. He was out of the league by 2015 with just 17 catches and 223 career receiving yards to his name.

Who they could’ve had: Alshon Jeffery-South Carolina, Mohamed Sanu-Rutgers, TY Hilton-FIU, Travis Benjamin-Miami (FL), Marvin Jones-California, Rishard Matthews-Nevada

Oakland Raiders-Jamarcus Russell-QB-LSU (1st Overall in 2007)

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Russell was a can’t miss quarterback prospect. Then he held out almost his entire rookie season because he wanted a bigger contract, went 7-18 as a starter, ballooned to 300 pounds, and was out of the league by 2010. He’s considered one of the biggest draft busts of all time, certainly the biggest of this millennium.

Who they could’ve had: Drew Stanton-Michigan State, Trent Edwards-Stanford (2007 was a REALLY bad year to pick a quarterback)

Miami Dolphins-Dion Jordan-EDGE-Oregon (3rd Overall in 2013)

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Issues with drugs caused Jordan to miss two entire seasons due to suspension. He only played 2 years with the Dolphins and has 1 career start. Currently a member of the Seahawks, he registered 4 sacks in 5 games last season so perhaps he’s turning a corner. But after the Dolphins traded up 9 spots to get him, they have to be fuming with the results they got.

Who they could’ve had: Ziggy Ansah-BYU, see Bjoern Werner’s section

Buffalo Bills-Aaron Maybin-EDGE-Penn State (11th Overall in 2009)

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Maybin had 6 career sacks and they were all for the division rival Jets in 2011. Maybin lasted just 2 years in Buffalo and was out of the league by 2013.

Who they could’ve had: Brian Orakpo-Texas, Clay Matthews-USC, Connor Barwin-Cincinnati, Paul Kruger-Utah, Michael Johnson-Georgia Tech

Washington Redskins-Rod Gardner-WR-Clemson (15th Overall in 2001)

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This was almost Patrick Ramsey, but Ramsey was taken 32nd in 2002 while Gardner went 15th in 2001 so Gardner edges him out. Gardner got off to a decent start, posting a 1000 yard season his second year, but he never eclipsed 700 again and was out of the league by 2007.

Who they could’ve had: Santana Moss-Miami (FL), Reggie Wayne-Miami (FL), Chad Johnson-Oregon State, Chris Chambers-Wisconsin, Steve Smith-Utah, TJ Houshmandzadeh-Oregon State

Green Bay Packers-Jamal Reynolds-EDGE-Florida State (10th Overall in 2001)

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Reynolds played just 3 seasons and had a grand total of 3 sacks in his career. Really can’t say much about his career because there was hardly anything to speak of. Really bad look for the tenth pick in the draft.

Who they could’ve had: Kyle Vanden Bosch-Nebraska, Aaron Schobel-TCU, Derrick Burgess-Ole Miss, Reggie Hayward-Iowa State,

Arizona Cardinals-Matt Leinart-QB-USC (10th Overall in 2006)

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It was hard to choose between Leinart and Jonathan Cooper (when you miss on a guard at #7 overall, you know you messed up). But the Cardinals have been scared to take a quarterback in the first round ever since the former Heisman Trophy winner, so he’s going to get the nod.

Who they could’ve had: Jay Cutler-Vanderbilt, Kellen Clemens-Oregon, Tarvaris Jackson-Alabama State, Charlie Whitehurst-Clemson

Baltimore Ravens-Breshad Perriman-WR-Central Florida (26th Overall in 2015)

at Nissan Stadium on November 5, 2017 in Nashville, Tennessee.

Similar situation with Perriman as Kevin White with the Bears. He has a lot of talent and is very fast for his size, but health has been a major issue. Perriman’s only made 4 starts and has just 43 catches in his two years of actually playing (2016 and 2017, he missed his rookie year).

Who they could’ve had: see Kevin White

Los Angeles Chargers-Larry English-EDGE-Northern Illinois (16th Overall in 2009)

at Qualcomm Stadium on August 8, 2013 in San Diego, California.

12 career sacks in 7 NFL seasons will not get the job done. English never had more than 3 sacks in a season and never started more than 5 games.

Who they could’ve had: see Aaron Maybin

Seattle Seahawks-Aaron Curry-LB-Wake Forest (4th Overall in 2009)

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Curry was considered the safest prospect in the class, however he just couldn’t figure things out in the NFL. He has since become a college coach at Charlotte.

Who they could’ve had: Brian Cushing-USC, James Laurinaitis-Ohio State, Rey Maualuga-USC, DeAndre Levy-Wisconsin

Dallas Cowboys-Bobby Carpenter-LB-Ohio State (18th Overall in 2006)

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A solid special teamer, but you don’t take a special teamer in the first round. Carpenter never made more than 3 starts in a season.

Who they could’ve had: DeMeco Ryans-Alabama, D’Qwell Jackson-Maryland, Stephen Tulloch-North Carolina State

Detroit Lions-Charles Rogers-WR-Michigan State (2nd Overall in 2003)

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Arguably the biggest wide receiver bust of all time, Rogers lasted just 3 seasons in the NFL and had a grand total of 440 yards in 15 games played.

Who they could’ve had: Andre Johnson-Miami (FL), Anquan Boldin-Florida State, Nate Burleson-Nevada, Brandon Lloyd-Illinois

Kansas City Chiefs-Glenn Dorsey-DL-LSU (5th Overall in 2008)

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Not gonna’ lie, I liked Dorsey so much in college that I bought his Chiefs jersey before his first NFL game. But he never amounted to anything with the Chiefs. He became a pretty good nose tackle with the 49ers, though.

Who they could’ve had: Pat Sims-Auburn, Red Bryant-Texas A&M, Ahtyba Rubin-Iowa State

Cincinnati Bengals-Peter Warrick-WR-Florida State (4th Overall in 2000)

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Warrick never managed more than 819 yards in a season, which wouldn’t be awful if he weren’t the 4th overall pick. Had he been a 4th rounder, we’d be considering him a steal. However, that production just won’t cut it for the value.

Who they could’ve had: Plaxico Burress-Michigan State, Laveraneus Coles-Florida State, Darrell Jackson-Florida

Los Angeles Rams-Jason Smith-OT-Baylor (2nd Overall in 2009)

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This very easily could’ve been Greg Robinson, as the credentials (tackle that was the 2nd overall pick) are basically identical. But Smith’s going to get the nod on the basis that he got beat out by the tackle the Rams took in the second round of the same draft (Indiana’s Rodger Saffold, who is still with the team to this day as a guard).

Who they could’ve had: Andre Smith-Alabama, Eugene Monroe-Virginia, Michael Oher-Ole Miss, Sebastian Vollmer-Houston

Carolina Panthers-Jeff Otah-OT-Pittsburgh (19th Overall in 2008)

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Very few busts for the Panthers, giving Otah the nod. Otah was decent when healthy, however he played just 29 games in his 4-year career and was out of the league by 2012.

Who they could’ve had: Duane Brown-Virginia Tech, King Dunlap-Auburn, Geoff Schwartz-Oregon

Tennessee Titans-Jake Locker-QB-Washington (8th Overall in 2011)

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Locker got off to a promising start, as he was pretty good in his first game, but he never got better. It’s also worth mentioning that all 7 guys picked ahead of him made the Pro Bowl in what was an absolutely stacked 2011 class. Locker retired after 4 seasons.

Who they could’ve had: Andy Dalton-TCU, Colin Kaepernick-Nevada, Tyrod Taylor-Virginia Tech

Atlanta Falcons-Jamaal Anderson-EDGE-Arkansas (8th Overall in 2007)

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Anderson registered just 7.5 career sacks, never more than 3 in a season, and was out of the league by 2013.

Who they could’ve had: Anthony Spencer-Purdue, Lamarr Woodley-Michigan, Charles Johnson-Georgia, Brian Robison-Texas

New Orleans Saints-Johnathan Sullivan-DL-Georgia (6th Overall in 2003)

2003 New Orleans Saints Headshots

All Images Copyright Michael C. Hebert

Sullivan played just 4 years in the NFL, 3 with the Saints, started 12 games as a rookie but 4 the rest of his career. He was out of the league by 2007.

Who they could’ve had: Kevin Williams-Oklahoma State

Pittsburgh Steelers-Jarvis Jones-EDGE-Georgia (19th Overall in 2013)

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6 career sacks for a guy who at one point in the draft process was being slated as the #1 overall pick. He’s currently a member of the Arizona Cardinals but hasn’t played a snap for them.

Who they could’ve had: see Dion Jordan

Jacksonville Jaguars-Luke Joeckel-OT-Texas A&M (2nd Overall in 2013)

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There were a lot of guys that were really deserving but Joeckel is going to win out because he was taken 2nd overall. Joeckel has been a turnstyle on the offensive line and is currently a member of the Seattle Seahawks, starting 11 games at guard for arguably the NFL’s worst offensive line.

Who they could’ve had: Lane Johnson-Oklahoma, Justin Pugh-Syracuse, Terron Armstead-Arkansas-Pine Bluff, David Bakhtiari-Colorado, Ricky Wagner-Wisconsin

Minnesota Vikings-Troy Williamson-WR-South Carolina (7th Overall in 2005)

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Williamson was an absolute freak at the Combine, but those skills never translated to the NFL. He never had more than 455 yards in a season and was out of the league by 2010.

Who they could’ve had: Roddy White-UAB, Vincent Jackson-Northern Colorado

New England Patriots-Dominique Easley-DL-Florida (29th Overall in 2014)

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Easley’s tenure in New England lasted just 2 seasons before he was traded to the Rams after numerous injuries and what many considered to be a “cancerous” personality in the locker room. It didn’t help that he only started 3 games for the Patriots.

Who they could’ve had: Timmy Jernigan-Florida State, Beau Allen-Wisconsin

Philadelphia Eagles-Danny Watkins-OG-Baylor (23rd Overall in 2011)

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Watkins played just 2 seasons with the Eagles before he retired to become a firefighter. Never made a huge impact when he was on the field either.

Who they could’ve had: Clint Boling-Georgia, Daniel Kilgore-Appalachian State

There are going to be busts in every draft, however there are also steals, guys who slip through the cracks and outperform their draft slot. Tomorrow I’m going to do something similar and pick out each team’s best draft steal since 2000. Let me know what you think of these draft busts in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

The Wonderlic Test: Football’s Most Puzzling Test of Players

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The Wonderlic Test is something that the NFL has potential Draft prospects take in order to test their intelligence. We often hear about leaked scores and which players performed well and which didn’t. The test is 50 questions and you have 12 minutes to complete it. Well, I took a sample Wonderlic while I was taking a break from writing my papers and guess what?

I’m in the 97th percentile among NFL prospects. Put me in coach!

I got a 38 on the Wonderlic, which actually ranks pretty well. Only one prospect has ever scored a perfect 50 on it, that being former Harvard punter Pat McInally back in the 70’s. McInally was a 5th round pick by the Bengals in the 1975 NFL Draft and went on to be their punter for a decade. The worst was former LSU corner Morris Claiborne and former Iowa State running back Darren Davis, both of whom scored a 4. Davis went undrafted and ended up playing in the CFL while Claiborne was made the 6th overall pick in the 2012 NFL Draft by the Dallas Cowboys. Claiborne was overall a bust with Dallas but he started showing some signs of being a solid corner upon joining the Jets. Here are some notable players who did really well on the Wonderlic.

Ryan Fitzpatrick-48

Ben Watson-48

Eric Decker-43

Blaine Gabbert-42

Calvin Johnson-41

Carson Wentz-40

Here are some guys who compared with me. Mind you, my score was a 38.

Eli Manning-39

Matthew Stafford-38

Colin Kapernick-38

Andrew Luck-37 (Yes, I scored higher than the supposed “genius” Andrew Luck)

Josh Allen-37

Tony Romo-37

Joey Bosa-37

Jared Goff-37

Drew Bledsoe-36

Sam Bradford-36

Aaron Rodgers-35

Jonathan Ogden-35

Tom Brady-33

And here are some guys who did really poorly.

Morris Claiborne-4

Frank Gore-6

Vince Young-6

Kelvin Benjamin-7

Terrelle Pryor-7

Bobby Wagner-8

AJ Green-10

Darrelle Revis-10

Leonard Fournette-11

Keyshawn Johnson-11

Jamal Adams-11

The best Wonderlic score in this year’s Draft class that has been leaked is Josh Allen’s 37. Another thing for draft pundits to gush over. The worst? Lamar Jackson’s 13. Granted, hardly anybody in the recent classes have been leaked, so it’s probable that there are better and worse scores. But having taken the test myself and seen what others have scored, what do I think of the Wonderlic?

I think it’s a poor method of projecting success in the league. Typically quarterbacks do really well on it but even that can’t project who is going to be particularly good. Ryan Fitzpatrick got a 48 and he’s just a quality backup. Blaine Gabbert scored a 41 and he was awful as a starter. Donovan McNabb scored a 14 and he’s one of the greatest quarterbacks the Eagles have ever had and was one of the best of the 2000’s. Terry Bradshaw scored a 15 and he’s a 4-time Super Bowl champion and a Hall of Famer. Yet there are other quarterbacks who did pretty well at it, like Eli Manning’s 39 and Carson Wentz’s 40 that went on to have successful careers. A lot of the questions are word associations or recognizing patterns in sequences. Hell, I couldn’t even finish mine (my last two answers were not recorded because I ran out of time) because of the 12-minute time limit. There are also plenty of players who did poorly on the Wonderlic and had great careers. Frank Gore had one of the worst Wonderlics of all time (6) and he’s the 49ers all-time leading rusher and a future Hall of Famer. Bobby Wagner is arguably the best linebacker in the game today and he scored an 8. AJ Green is one of the best receivers in the game and he got a 10.

My point is, Draft analysts really shouldn’t take any stock into how a player does on the Wonderlic because it really doesn’t do a good job of projecting who’s going to be good. In fact, I’m not even sure why it’s even administered because none of the questions I answered had anything to do with football.

So I’m going to post two links. The first link is to the Wonderlic Test that I took. Granted it’s a sample but the questions are supposedly very similar to what the players have to take. There also may have been some improper coding done because a couple of questions I answered were repeats. The other link I’m posting is to a list of players and their Wonderlic scores so you can see how you did compared to some notable NFL players.

https://samplewonderlictest.com/

http://wonderlictestsample.com/nfl-wonderlic-scores/

So that’s going to do it for today’s blog. Let me know what you think of the Wonderlic in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10. Also be sure to let me know how you did!

 

The XFL is Returning

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As you may have heard, WWE Chairman Vince McMahon will be restarting his failed football league from 2001, the XFL. The original rendition of this league flopped heavily due to both ratings and bad football. It took place during the NFL offseason and featured fewer rules and encouraged heavy violence. Allegedly, McMahon is restarting this league because he sees an opportunity, since the NFL’s ratings are down as of late and people have been openly complaining about the product, whether it be how the game is officiated to injuries to off the field social issues.

As I scroll through the Wikipedia article, I’m noticing some VERY interesting things about the first edition of the XFL. There were 8 teams: the Orlando Rage, Chicago Enforcers, New York/Jersey Hitmen, Birmingham Thunderbolts, Los Angeles Xtreme, San Francisco Demons, Memphis Maniax, and Las Vegas Outlaws. The Xtreme were champions in the only year of existence. There was an emphasis on combining wrestling with football, as players and coaches would be mic’d up during games and the public address announcers would talk trash while scantily-clad cheerleaders pranced along the sidelines (and were encouraged to date players). There was no pre-game coin toss. Instead, officials would roll the ball and two players from each team would dive for it in a scrum and whomever came out with it got to decide whether to kick or receive. This was referred to as the “Human Coin Toss.” The league MVP was Tommy Maddox, a former first round pick in the NFL and the quarterback that preceded Ben Roethlisberger in Pittsburgh, where he signed after the XFL folded. Former first round pick Jim Druckenmiller and current Purdue head coach Jeff Brohm were also notable players who played quarterback in the league. Former Heisman winner Rashaan Salaam played in the league as well. Runningback Rod Smart actually wore “He Hate Me” on the back of his jersey rather than his own last name.

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Some interesting rules included no PAT kick, you had to go for two after every touchdown except it only counted for one extra point, but you could get bonus points if you agreed to run the play from a further distance than the traditional 2-yard line for up to 3 extra points. Their overtime rules were similar to the NCAA except there were no opportunities for first downs, you must score within four plays. Also, before the ball was snapped, one player is allowed to get a running start toward the line of scrimmage as long as he is outside of the tackles, rather than standing still and being set. Punting was also heavily affected in the XFL. For example, punting out of bounds resulted in a 10-yard penalty, the punting team could recover the ball as long as it traveled 25 yards and regain possession even if the receiving team didn’t touch it, and most insanely, fair catches are not recognized. I’m sure when the XFL reboots, which is expected to occur in 2020, some of these rules may not be a thing.

So what can we expect to see out of the XFL? Well, we really have no idea what to expect, but here are a few things I’d like to see.

WWE Wrestlers Signed to Rosters, Wrestling Moves are Legal

This isn’t the craziest idea in the world because there are some WWE wrestlers with football experience. Brock Lesnar participated in training camp with the Minnesota Vikings. Roman Reigns was a defensive tackle at Georgia Tech. Hell, the Rock was a defensive end at Miami (FL) during the days when they were “The U.” Will they be good? Probably not, but I wouldn’t mind watching Lesnar suplex some runningbacks or Reigns spear a scrambling quarterback. Sure it might affect their wrestling schedules, but Lesnar barely shows up on WWE programming anyway and Reigns often gets booed out of the building so I’m sure some of these guys wouldn’t mind a chance to do something else.

Well-Defined Catch Rules

This is probably the biggest crutch facing the NFL right now as nobody really knows for certain what a catch is anymore. If the XFL can easily define it and have good success with their rules, we could see the NFL try and adapt. But hey, it’s Vince McMahon, whose WWE repeatedly changes its rules to fit the narrative they’re trying to tell so I wouldn’t be surprised if the rules are pretty loose.

“Exiled” Players Getting a Second Chance

The XFL is a great opportunity for guys who aren’t good enough for the NFL or guys who likely won’t make it back into the NFL to return to the spotlight. For example, I wouldn’t be shocked in the slightest to see Johnny Manziel and Tim Tebow quarterbacking teams in this new league. Maybe even Colin Kaepernick or Ray Rice. But the point is, the XFL can kind of serve as a secondary league. Hell, guys in the NFL who are in a contract year could use the XFL as a bargaining chip. If Le’Veon Bell doesn’t want to play on the Franchise Tag for the Steelers, he could threaten to go play for the Memphis Maniax.

Surprise Entrants on the Field

Let’s say a fight breaks out during the game. Let’s say Brock Lesnar is beating the Hell out of Roman Reigns. In a normal NFL game, referees and teammates try and break it up. But what if we hear Hulk Hogan’s theme music as he runs out onto the field to attack Lesnar, then takes a microphone and announces he’s joined Reigns’ team as the camera shows Lesnar’s shocked face. I can already hear the “bah gawd’s!”

The Championship Trophy is a Belt

That’s really all I have to say on this topic. You saw how the Turnover Chain worked for the U. Imagine if your goal was getting a title belt. They could treat it like the Stanley Cup and every player on the winning team gets to take the belt and do with it as he pleases.

A Women’s XFL Division

The LFL is already a thing and WWE over the last couple of years has been trying to make an improvement on how they promote women’s wrestling (which has been pretty poor in the past to say the least). Perhaps they’d be invested in a female division of the XFL with a few all-female teams that would face each other.

Weapons

Offensive linemen can use steel chairs and put opposing pass rushers through tables. Or, what if you gained a weapon you can use for one play when you stopped at a certain part of the field. Perhaps if you’re tackled on the opponent’s 30 yard line, you can unlock a ladder that you can set up in the opponent’s end zone then plant a receiver in there. They can get really creative with this.

Unfortunately, very little of this will likely happen, especially considering McMahon announced that he won’t take players with any form of criminal record, which would rule out guys like Manziel and Rice. He also said he wants it to be “family-friendly” and emphasized forcing players to stand for the National Anthem. Plus, if they do revert to their old style of rules from the initial rendition, there will be outrage from the media and players, as the safety issues that the NFL struggles with right now would be increased ten fold in the XFL. In all, I really don’t expect this to do very well in the long run. The NFL is just too dominant to compete with. I think the XFL will do well its first week or so, but once people see how bad the quality of football is, they may see it as another Arena Football League. That being said, it is fun to theorize what could become legal in was originally intended to be a more barbaric football league.

That’s it for today’s blog, let me know what you think of the XFL revival and any creative rules you might have for the product in the comments section below and hit me up on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10 and contribute to my Patreon.

The Quarterbacks of the 2018 NFL Draft Class

As much as people like to say that the 2018 draft class is the weakest since 2013 (which it kind of is), there is still at least one redeeming factor: the quarterback class. I think this group has the potential to be as good, if not better, than the 2012 group that saw the likes of Andrew Luck, Russell Wilson, Ryan Tannehill, and Robert Griffin III (for one season) emerge. I’m going to go through a few guys that I like that have the potential to go in the first round. These aren’t necessarily rankings as much as they are just going down the list of guys and saying what I like and don’t like about them and what type of future I see in them.

Josh Allen-Wyoming

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So far, for the underclassman quarterbacks, Allen is the only one who has declared for the Draft. There were talks that he could’ve come out last year and potentially been a high pick, but he elected to return to school to develop, which I thought was a smart move. However his season didn’t go that great, though a bum shoulder can certainly be a contributing factor. But he did deliver his best performance of the 2017 season in the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl (what a stupid fucking name) yesterday against Central Michigan. He didn’t throw the ball much, only 11 completions on 19 attempts, but he made the most of his throws, including 3 touchdowns in the first quarter. Wyoming ran the ball a TON in that game (42 times) but it was what they needed as they scored an easy victory over the Chippewas.

Strengths: Size, Arm, Mobility

Just look at this throw from Allen as you try not to vomit from looking at the uniform/field combinations.

That, folks, is what we call a laser. Allen has an absolute cannon and as you saw right up there, is accurate enough to squeeze the ball into tight spaces. He’s got the prototypical size you look for in a QB, as he stands at 6’5 233 pounds, which puts him at about the same size as Carson Wentz. He’s also deceptively quick for a guy his size, as Wyoming would often have him running the football, which he did as many as 18 times in a game this season.

Weaknesses: Level of Competition, Poor Showings Against Power-5 Teams, Health

As far as physical traits go, Allen is about as perfect a specimen as you could ask for. It’s the other stuff that might make you nervous. He played in a very weak conference in the Mountain West and the Cowboys couldn’t even win it, as they went 7-5 prior to their bowl win. He also had a chance to show what he could do against tougher competition like Iowa and Oregon, but both games were disasters for him, as he combined to go 32-64 (50% completions), 238 yards, 0 touchdowns, and 3 interceptions. That’s just awful. To be fair to Allen, the talent around him is pretty bad, so perhaps he can be forgiven for those showings, but for being as highly touted a quarterback as he is, he needs to be able to elevate the play of his teammates. These aren’t fair comparisons to make, I know, but you see guys like Tom Brady and Aaron Rodgers make their teammates significantly better by just being on the field. I don’t see that from Allen. Health is also a concern, as he missed the final two games of the regular season while nursing that bum shoulder. He also missed basically all of his 2015 season with a broken clavicle, a bone located in the shoulder region.

Draft Thoughts: I wouldn’t draft Allen in the first round unless I had a veteran who was on the way out that he could sit behind and not only learn from, but adapt to the higher level of competition as well as a strong supporting cast around him. This kid has all the ability in the world but he really hasn’t shown it to the extent that one would think of with a kid who has been in the discussion for number 1 overall pick. Some potential landing spots could be the Arizona Cardinals, New England Patriots, Los Angeles Chargers, New York Giants, and Pittsburgh Steelers.

Pro Comparison: 

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Carson Wentz. Both came from small schools where they played against inferior competition but showcased some high level skills and prototypical measurables that get scouts excited.

 

Sam Darnold-USC

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Before the season began, Darnold was the consensus number 1 overall pick in the Draft. He had won the starting job for USC midseason and led the Trojans on an absolute tear en route to a Rose Bowl victory over Penn State. However, his encore left a lot to be desired. He struggled MIGHTILY with turnovers this season, leading all players in that category, whether it be interceptions or fumbles. Darnold’s throwing motion also became widely criticized as being “funky.” Nonetheless, he showed some really good things as well, such as his ability to make big time throws and great mobility.

Strengths: Size, Arm, Mobility, Elevating Teammates, Winner

When Darnold took over the starting job in 2016, USC was 1-3 and head coach Clay Helton’s job was in SERIOUS danger. Once Darnold took over for Max Browne, however, USC’s fortunes flipped and they didn’t lose another game the rest of the season. He’s got excellent arm strength and can put balls in spots that a lot of quarterbacks can’t. I watched a couple of games this year and a few of his 12 interceptions were the result of his receivers dropping the ball and it landing in a defender’s arms. I think Darnold really missed Juju Smith-Schuster this past year because the only quality receiver on the Trojans was Deontay Burnett and he’s a marginal NFL prospect at this stage. This is also something Darnold does that Allen doesn’t: he makes his teammates better. Guys like Burnett really aren’t that great of talent, but they perform beyond their talent because Darnold gives them the opportunity to make plays with where he puts the ball at times. Also has very good footwork in the pocket, as he’s always in a position to scurry away from the rush when needed.

Weaknesses: Delivery, Decision-Making

Watch how long it takes Darnold to throw the ball after beginning his motion.

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Now look at how Tom Brady throws it, which is widely considered to be the ideal throwing motion.

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What’s different is where the ball is when they begin their throwing motion. Darnold basically has the ball at his hip where he starts, Brady’s is practically at his shoulder. Darnold’s also kind of winding up like a pitcher in baseball instead of just slinging it like what the best quarterbacks do. That’s something that can be worked with though, as a good coach can help tweak that. But the reason Darnold’s isn’t great is because that extra split second is the difference between the pass rusher getting a sack or just getting pressure. Or a receiver open and a safety cutting him off. His elongated throwing motion very easily could have led to a lot of his interceptions or strip sacks. Perhaps on some picks the guy was open when he started his motion, but he took so long to get the ball there that the defender was in position by the time the ball was out.

Draft Thoughts: I personally think that returning to USC for one more season could be really beneficial for Darnold to have a full season to refine a new throwing motion before getting thrown to the wolves like he would be in the NFL. But I think he’s going to declare for the Draft and he’s so gifted and played against such good competition, he’s not going to make it past the top 5 picks. How he performs against Ohio State in the Fiesta Bowl will be a huge barometer for how well he might transition to the pros. That’s about as close to an NFL defense as he’ll face all year and if he performs really well, he could justifiably be the top pick. I think quarterback-needy teams such as the Browns, Giants, and Broncos should all be in on this kid.

Pro Comparison: 

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Philip Rivers. Both guys have similar thick builds and have similar throwing motions and have a tendency to make the best of what they have. Rivers rarely ever has Pro Bowl-caliber receivers (Keenan Allen has been the one exception the last few years) but he gets them to play beyond their ability (Tyrell Williams, Dontrelle Inman, among others).

Lamar Jackson-Louisville

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Lamar Jackson is the most exciting player in college football. He won the Heisman Trophy in 2016 and actually improved in 2017. At first, I thought no chance is he an NFL quarterback, but after watching some throws he was making, I started re-evaluating things. I still think he would make a better wide receiver in the NFL, where his elusiveness can be better utilized, but if he can continue to grow as a passer the way he did between 2016 and ’17, then we could be looking at the next Michael Vick

Strengths: Running Ability, Arm Strength

If a defense isn’t careful, Jackson can take over games with his legs. I mean, human beings shouldn’t be this athletic.

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But Jackson is. Not only that, but in 2017 his passing numbers skyrocketed while his rushing totals kept pace with his monstrous 2016 season. Just look at this throw right here.

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This is a beautiful job of reading the safeties and hitting his receiver in stride.

Weaknesses: Size, Gimmick Play Style

You might notice that Lamar Jackson is PAINFULLY skinny, especially at a position where it’s become of heightened importance to have some build to you due to how much damage you take. Add in the fact that Jackson is a running quarterback that by nature will take a lot of hits, and you have the potential of a guy who may have a shortened career. Also, when was the last time a run-first quarterback had long-term success in the NFL? The only one I can think of is Michael Vick and he was a once-in-a-generation talent. You could argue Russell Wilson, but his passing game has developed so well that he’s kind of shed the mold of a run-first quarterback. Jackson will need to follow Wilson’s developmental model if he wants to have a long career in this league.

Draft Thoughts: Again, I would prefer it if Jackson were to move to wide receiver, as I think that would be where he’d have the most success in this league. I wouldn’t take him in the first round just on the reputation of running quarterbacks and their lack of sustained success alone. However I do think that there will be a team that will be interested enough to take a chance on him in the first round, though I think as a quarterback he’s a third rounder. I think a team like the Buffalo Bills could be a landing spot for him, as he plays a similar style of game to the incumbent Tyrod Taylor, who has been handled about as poorly as an organization can handle a quarterback.

Pro Comparison: 

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Colin Kaepernick. They basically have identical frames with great athleticism and strong throwing arms. Kap is one of the aforementioned run-first quarterbacks that fizzled out as their careers went along.

Baker Mayfield-Oklahoma

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Baker Mayfield is about as polarizing a quarterback prospect as I can find. On the one hand, I see a lot of Russell Wilson in him. He’s short for a quarterback (6’0) but he plays with a lot of intensity and is able to use his legs to make plays, whether that be scrambling for a first down or moving out of the pocket to buy his receivers time to get open. On the other, he shows some Johnny Manziel traits that scare me. Mayfield is the reigning Heisman Trophy winner and has led Oklahoma to a CFP berth for the second time in the last 3 years.

Strengths: Playmaking Ability, Athleticism, Accuracy, Intensity

Look at this play from Oklahoma’s bowl game last year.

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Notice how he never took his eye away from downfield but was still able to react accordingly to the unblocked defender that his guard absolutely WHIFFED on. A lot of quarterbacks in that situation will panic and chuck it away or into coverage, including Tom Brady. But Mayfield is so confident in his running ability that he doesn’t panic and uses his peripherals to his advantage, then drops a dime to Dede Westbrook. Which brings me to another point of strength with him: his accuracy. Mayfield led the nation in completion percentage this season and being accurate is something that translates to the NFL extremely well. Also that play above was on a fourth down, showing how cool under pressure he can be.

Weaknesses: Height, Decision-Making (not interception-related)

My main concern with Mayfield is that despite having the potential to be the next Russell Wilson, I could also just as easily see him being the next Johnny Manziel. Mayfield’s had three instances this season where his maturity was called into question. The first came in the offseason when he was tackled by campus police after trying to flee while publicly intoxicated. The next time was planting the OU flag at midfield after their win against Ohio State. Finally, the whole grabbing his nuts and cussing at the Kansas bench. The first his just him being an idiot college kid, but Manziel had a host of incidents like that. The other on-field incidents could result in fines and some unwanted media attention were they to occur in an NFL game.

Draft Thoughts: As much as it seems like I might be criticizing Mayfield’s antics, I actually chalk this up more to just him being really intense and getting really amped up during games rather than him just being a prick, which was the vibe I got when Manziel would do his antics. I think it’s more likely that Mayfield becomes the next Russell Wilson than the next Johnny Manziel but I’d like to see him sit a year behind a veteran before being thrust into a professional offense, as he was in an air raid system at Oklahoma, which translates about as poorly to the NFL as any offense in college football outside of the wishbone. I personally would take him in the second round, but I think someone will take a chance on him in the first. I think some potential landing spots could be the Jaguars, Bills, and Cardinals.

Pro Comparison: 

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Russell Wilson. I’ve already made the comparison enough in this so I’m just going to leave it at that.

Josh Rosen-UCLA

at Rose Bowl on November 24, 2017 in Pasadena, California.

This is my favorite quarterback in this class and if I were the Cleveland Browns, I’m taking him #1. He literally has everything, the only issue I’ll get into later. I was extremely impressed by some of the throws he made when he squared off with Darnold to the point where I couldn’t believe they were even being compared to each other. Rosen has been the starting quarterback at UCLA since he set foot on campus. He showed a lot of promise as a freshman, but was lost in his sophomore season due to injury. Then his junior season he picked up right where he left off from his freshman season, opening the season with an incredible comeback against Texas A&M.

Strengths: Arm Talent, Pocket Presence, Experience

Are you kidding me with this ball placement right here?

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If this is thrown in any other spot, it’s picked off and based on how few Bruins are in the vicinity, it likely would’ve resulted in great field position for the Aggies. But he’s able to thread the needle and put the ball in the spot where only his receiver could get it. He’s also great in the pocket, as he seamlessly navigates the pocket and avoids pressure.

Weaknesses: Personality, Winning Percentage

The main knock I keep hearing from NFL scouts is that Rosen is a huge turnoff, with one scout going so far as to call him an “entitled prick.” They didn’t go into much detail about why that was, but it wasn’t a one-time occurrence. Rosen also hasn’t generated a ton of wins for UCLA, as his career record is only 17-13 (Darnold’s is 20-2 for comparison). However I think that has more to do with the talent around him, as his defense was pretty bad this season.

Draft Thoughts: I would take Rosen with the top pick in the Draft. I think he has all the measurables you could ask for in a quarterback and despite complaints from scouts about his personality, he has gotten the backing of his teammates, who seem to like him, which matters significantly more to me than whether scouts think he’s a dick or not.

Pro Comparison: 

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Matt Ryan. Both have similar builds and similar play styles with great pocket presence.

Mason Rudolph-Oklahoma State

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Mason Rudolph was the orchestrator of some of the most exciting games in college football this season, particularly his duel with Baker Mayfield in the Bedlam Game. Despite losing the game 62-52, Rudolph was spectacular against his Heisman-winning counterpart. Rudolph also seems to develop great relationships with his receivers, as both James Washington and Marcell Ateman had tremendous seasons catching passes from Rudolph.

Strengths: Arm Talent, Size

Rudolph is basically the exact same size as Allen, 6’5 230 so the benefits between these two are basically identical. Rudolph played in an offense that elevated your stats, but he took advantage of that better than anybody outside of Pat Mahomes. He may have run an air raid offense, but his ball placement and arm talent often made up for the lack of playbook. Look at this throw right here.

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Yes his receiver missed the catch, but that ball went right through his hands and that ball could not have been thrown more perfectly. You’ve got to catch that if you’re the OK State receiver. Also, notice where that ball was thrown from: the 50. He was able to hit a touch throw 50 yards downfield and he didn’t even have to get much of a crowhop under there. Rudolph’s arm will be very enticing to NFL Teams.

Weaknesses: Type of Offense Run, Mobility

The type of offense run is a big one, mainly because he hasn’t had to make very many different kinds of throws. The routes the Cowboys receivers run are about as simplistic as they come and he’s never had to learn a playbook, which is what he’ll need to be able to do in the NFL. He’s probably going to have the biggest learning curve out of all the guys on this list but the talent is there. He’s also slow as dirt and his pocket presence and his ability to avoid pressure could use some work.

Draft Thoughts: Rudolph has a lot of talent but he might need a year or two to learn how to operate an NFL offense before being thrust into a starting role. I wouldn’t take him higher than the second round but I also wouldn’t be surprised if a desperate team falls in love with him and takes him earlier than they probably should. I think the Saints would be the perfect landing spot for him, as that would probably be the smoothest transition for him, the Saints offense being the closest we have to an Air Raid offense in the NFL. Plus their success on the ground could take a lot of pressure off him when Drew Brees decides to hang them up.

Pro Comparison: 

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A better version of Bryce Petty. Both guys had similar skillsets and flaws coming out of college, however I think Rudolph is a bit more refined than Petty, who has shown the occasional flash in the NFL but the entire body of work hasn’t been great. I think if Rudolph is thrusted into the starting role too soon, then his career will be disastrous.

Those are my thoughts on a potentially stacked 2018 quarterback class. Agree? Disagree Let me know in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman 10 and contribute to my Patreon.

Dear Mr. Trump, Beware of the NFL

Those of you who know me know I avoid politics like the plague. I would go into a tangent about why I hate everything there is to hate about politics, but I think Frank Reynolds of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia sums up my thoughts nicely:792330

But when politics sticks its nose into my beloved sports, that’s where I draw the line. I can’t keep my silence further following Donald Trump’s comments about NFL players taking a knee. But to really express my opinions and where my heart stands to the fullest extent, I need to start at the beginning: with Colin Kaepernick.

When Colin Kaepernick sat on the bench during the singing of the national anthem before the start of a preseason game, I thought very little of it. My thoughts were that he was about to lose his starting job to Blaine freaking Gabbert and he wanted to get his name back into relevance after a steep decline in performance since the end of the 2013 season, when he was a Richard Sherman tipped pass away from taking the San Francisco 49ers to repeat Super Bowl appearances. I thought the media debates about whether Kap was in the right or wrong were completely unnecessary and stupid and I was confident that it would die out once the regular season started. Because really, you can only muster up so many interesting storylines when the games don’t count. Kap sat in protest of police shootings of unarmed black men such as Alton Sterling and Philando Castile and when the media wouldn’t let the story die, I started to form my own opinions. On one hand, I didn’t like that Kap was sitting during the national anthem, I thought it was disrespectful to a country that allows far more opportunities than most, if not all, other nations. In many countries, Kap would be executed for treason, but here, his only execution is in the court of public opinion. On the other hand, I totally agreed with his reasoning for it and I liked that he chose to protest peacefully rather than violently, which helps nobody.  Yet still, I felt the whole topic was tiresome and wouldn’t go anywhere so I didn’t get too invested. But then other players started kneeling. Kap’s teammates, particularly Eric Reid and Eli Harold, would kneel on the sideline with him. Brandon Marshall of the Denver Broncos knelt on opening night of the regular season. So many players started following Kap’s lead and it got me to thinking that maybe there was something more to this. The fact that so many players felt the same way as Kap should tell you that these guys are really hurting and I grew more sympathetic to their cause.

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From left to right, Eli Harold, Colin Kaepernick, and Eric Reid all kneel before a 2016 NFL game (photo credit: The Mercury News)

It became the talk of the season as various players displayed their own methods of protest. Some I loved (the black power fist, interlocking arms), some I didn’t (sitting). But regardless of your thoughts on the man or the issues at hand, Kap succeeded. He got us talking about the state of race relations in America again. I personally don’t care for some of Kap’s actions (wearing a Fidel Castro shirt during a press conference, wearing socks with pigs dressed as cops on them, never having registered to vote, etc.) but I would argue that the message he is trying to send is more important than what the man is himself. And if you believe that what these players are doing is disrespectful to the troops, I offer you this:

Unfortunately for Kap’s career, he took his stance during a contract year. He became a free agent and no team wanted to sign him. The Baltimore Ravens almost did, head coach John Harbaugh and GM Ozzie Newsome wanted to sign Kap but owner Steve Bisciotti overruled them. A lot of people were outraged that Kap remained unsigned into training camp when there were quarterbacks on NFL rosters, some even starting, who were far inferior to Kap, who was coming off a decent season. I honestly do not blame the owners for not wanting to sign Kap. In my personal opinion and through my evaluations of his performance last year, he isn’t good enough to be worth the media circus that would follow his signing. Should Kap be on a team? Based on some of the talent teams like the Colts and Jets have put out there, absolutely, from a talent standpoint. But on most teams Kap would be the backup and would you really want all these distractions storming into your locker room over your backup quarterback? Regardless of your opinions on his stance, his presence alone will bring more unwanted media attention than today’s NFL team already has. And while I fully believe he will have the support of his teammates, the NFL is a business and the bottom line reigns supreme and anyone who could negatively affect the bottom line will not find himself a spot on the team. It may have cost him his football career, but Colin Kaepernick was successful in his message.

And then Donald Trump did what he always does, puts in his two cents where nobody wants it. Below is a direct quote from the man in the Oval Office.

“Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now, out, he’s fired. He’s fired…You know, some owner is going to do that. He’s going to say, ‘That guy that disrespects our flag, he’s fired.’ And that owner, they don’t know it [but] they’ll be the most popular person in this country.”

He also tweeted this out:

NFL players, of course, were none too pleased with his remarks.

NFL teams came out in full force to protest Trump’s remarks. Some teams, such as the Steelers, Titans, and Seahawks, stayed in the locker room for the anthem.

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Neither the Titans nor the Seahawks came on to the field for the national anthem following Trump’s remarks. (photo credit: The Daily Caller)

Mr. Trump, when you advocate free speech like you did for the Charlottesville rallies, you can’t be selective. You can’t say one form of free speech is acceptable and one isn’t. That’s not how it works. Either it’s all okay or none of it is. You might think you are being patriotic by telling people that what these athletes are doing is wrong and disrespectful. But your response to their actions are far more rude and offensive than their’s will ever be. I would argue that the players are being more patriotic than you are by enacting their constitutional right to peacefully protest. You condemn this:

But not this?

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White Supremacists rally with torches in Charlottesville, VA (photo credit: NPR)

The NFL is a brotherhood. When you disrespect one man, you disrespect them all. You couldn’t possibly understand why these guys choose to protest or what they’ve had to endure because of the color of their skin. You couldn’t possibly or you wouldn’t have said what you said. I can’t possibly know either, but the difference between you and me is that I at least have empathy, I try and keep an open mind. I used to dismiss this movement but I have learned to appreciate what they’ve had to go through and the fact that these men are really hurting right now and need support. Your open disrespect towards them is shameful, appalling, and classless.