General Sports: May 5

-Albert Pujols got his 3000th hit on a dink into right field off of Mariners right hander Mike Leake. Kind of the opposite of what you would expect from a guy with 3000 hits and over 600 home runs, one of four guys to ever do so (Hank Aaron, Willie Mays and Alex Rodriguez are the others). Here’s the historic knock.

https://twitter.com/MLBONFOX/status/992609290123816960

It’s also interesting to note, as ESPN Stats and Info pointed out, this is the fourth consecutive season that saw a player get their 3000th hit. 2015 was A-Rod, 2016 was Ichiro, 2017 was Adrian Beltre, now Pujols in 2018. Baseball is weird. But I couldn’t be happier for Pujols. He was my favorite player when I was a kid and while he fell on hard times with the Angels, that has done nothing to diminish my memory of his greatness in St. Louis. I mean Hell, for each of the first 10 seasons of his career he hit .300 with 30 home runs and 100 RBI. And he just missed out on an 11th in 2011 when he hit .299. A great moment for perhaps the greatest hitter of his generation.

-The Dodgers got a huge positive in a season full of negatives as their pitching staff threw the 12th combined no hitter in Major League history. The combination of Walker Buehler, Tony Cingrani, Yimi Garcia, and Adam Liberatore shut down the Padres lineup for a special series in Monterrey, Mexico for the first combined no hitter since 2014 when the Phillies used 4 pitchers to no hit the Braves. Fun fact, the first ever combined no hitter was started by Babe Ruth in 1917 when he was with the Red Sox. He walked the first batter, chewed out the umpire, got himself ejected, then his replacement Ernie Shore retired the next 27 batters, which included Ruth’s inherited runner getting caught stealing. There wasn’t another combined no hitter until 50 years later in 1967 when the Orioles used 2 pitchers to no hit the Tigers and LOST (starting pitcher Steve Barber went 8.2 innings and walked 10 batters. His reliever, Stu Miller, got just one out). Normally I’m not a fan of guys getting pulled in the middle of a no hitter, but in this case I think it was warranted. Walker Buehler turns 24 in July and he’s had a history of health issues with his arm during his young career. He was at 93 pitches after completing 6 innings of work so it was only inevitable he was going to get pulled. I felt like he could’ve gone another inning, but ultimately it didn’t matter. This isn’t the first time Roberts has done this sort of thing. A couple years ago, Ross Stripling was making his Major League debut and had a no hitter going into the 8th but got pulled by Roberts due to his pitch count being over 100. That time it backfired, as the Giants pummeled the relievers and won the game. But Stripling’s family actually thanked Roberts for pulling Stripling because they knew Roberts was concerned about protecting the kid’s arm. So if they’re cool with it, I’m cool with it. And once again, Roberts pulls a young starter with immense potential (his season ERA is just a little over 1) due to health concerns in the middle of his no-hit bid. This time it worked out. What a treat for the people of Monterrey, Mexico, though. They get Major League Baseball coming to town and the first game is a no hitter.

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-Matt Harvey was DFA’d by the Mets after refusing an outright assignment to AAA. This has been a pretty steep fall from grace for the guy who was looking like the next big ace for the Mets. Hell he was nicknamed “The Dark Knight” as a 24 year-old. He debuted in 2012 and started the All Star Game for the National League in 2013 when the game was at Citi Field. He struggled with injuries for much of his career but when healthy, he was one of the best right handers in the game, carrying a sub-3 ERA each of the first 3 years of his career. Then Game 5 of the 2015 World Series happened. Harvey was spinning an absolute GEM. The Royals failed to score all game against Harvey and the Mets were entering the 9th inning up 2-0 and Terry Collins was about to pull Harvey for closer Jeurys Familia. Harvey convinced Colins to leave him in the game and Collins listened. Then Harvey walked Lorenzo Cain and served up an RBI double to Eric Hosmer to make it 2-1 before Collins finally pulled Harvey. Hosmer was able to score to tie the game up then the Royals scored 5 runs in the 12th and won the World Series. Ever since that game Harvey has been a shell of his former self, as he not only pitched poorly, but emotional problems began to take hold. In 2016 he had a 4.86 ERA and in 2017 it was 6.70. In 2018 Harvey was carrying an ERA of 7.00 before being DFA’d after being sent to the bullpen. Harvey’s issues were also off the field, as he missed a game last season after a night of drinking resulting from seeing his ex-girlfriend, super model Adriana Lima, with Patriots receiver Julian Edelman. This was one of many personal issues that Harvey allowed to affect his performance and now he’s being DFA’d by the Mets. If Harvey goes unclaimed by another team, he can accept a minor league assignment or be outright released. A part of me feels bad for the guy because he’s as talented as they come but he can’t get out of his own head. Hopefully a change of scenery is exactly what he needs to get his career back on track.

-I wanted to blog this yesterday but some school-related issues forced me to put this off until today. But Ichiro Suzuki’s career is basically over. Yes, his agent said he isn’t retiring, just moving to a front office position with the Mariners, but come on. Have you seen Ichiro lately? He’s not the hitter he once was by a LONG SHOT. He’s not the man who opened his Major League career with a record 10 consecutive 200 hit seasons nor the guy with the most hits ever as a professional hitter (Japan and Major Leagues combined). Hell he didn’t join the Major Leagues until he was 27 and he still managed to join the 3000 hit club. Now? He’s 44 years old, going to be 45 in October, and he was slashing .205/.255/.205 prior to the announcement. There were talks amongst Mariners Twitter whether or not the team should demote him because it was becoming apparent that his presence on the roster was becoming a liability. I doubt a Major League team’s going to pick him up given how apparent the deterioration of his skills has been. If he does want to continue playing baseball, I think his best bet is going to be a return to Japan where I guarantee he will get a hero’s welcome. The guy is as classy as they come and one of the greatest pure hitters of all time and I wish him all the best in his future endeavors.

-The Milwaukee Bucks are going to interview Spurs assistant coach Becky Hammon for their vacant head coaching position. Hammon made airwaves by being a female assistant coach in the NBA but from what I understand she’s very well-respected and must be a damn good coach because she’s held the position for 4 years, which is a long time for an assistant coach to be with a franchise. She takes over head coaching duties for the Spurs during the Summer League so it’s not like this is uncharted waters for her. Oh and there’s the whole nugget that she’d be the NBA’s first ever female head coach if she does land the job with the Bucks, who fired Jason Kidd midseason and had been running with Joe Prunty through their playoff exit against the Celtics. Hammon won’t be the only member of the Spurs organization the Bucks will be interviewing, though, as assistant coaches James Borrego, Ettore Messina, and front office member Monty Williams are all expected to be interviewed as well. Probably trying to recreate the magic that is Greg Popovich. It’ll be interesting to see how her interview goes because she will be under a LOT of scrutiny if she does land the position. But if you can work under Pop, you can work in any situation so I’m confident she’d be able to handle it.

-Ben Roethlisberger was seemingly not a fan of the Steelers taking Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph in last week’s NFL Draft, saying he doesn’t think that a backup or third stringer in the third round was such a good pick to help the team win now. He also said (perhaps jokingly) that he wasn’t going to mentor Rudolph and if he had any questions, Roethlisberger would just “point to the playbook.” Whether he’s joking or not, I actually love this move. I think too often we just assume a quarterback is going to just go quietly. But not Ben. He wants to let everyone know this is still his team and he’s going to give it up when he’s good and ready. And to be fair, he’s earned that right. He’s a 2-time Super Bowl-winning quarterback and his numbers are actually getting better with age (having a receiver like Antonio Brown probably helps). I think it’s also good for Rudolph that he isn’t given anything. I think too often we just assume that when a guy might be a franchise quarterback that they’re going to be given everything they need to succeed. Well Big Ben wants you to earn what you get and I fully respect it. But now that you’ve made claims like these, you’ve got to go back it up with your play. You have to prove that this is in fact still your team and the fact you’re 36 years old isn’t an issue.

That’s going to do it for this edition of General Sports. Let me know what you think of the topics discussed in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

General Sports: April 8

-So remember how I wrote yesterday that Phillies manager Gabe Kapler was on the hot seat after only 6 games? Well…

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It seems that Kapler survives another day. The Marlins got out to a quick 1-0 lead thanks to a wild pitch by Vince Velasquez, then things imploded for Miami. Maikel Franco hit a grand slam in the first inning, Altherr hit another grand slam in the third, then an 8-run 4th inning. A few factoids from reading the box score:

  1. Everybody who had a plate appearance for the Phillies got a hit (with the exception of relief pitcher Jake Thompson). Even starting pitcher Velasquez recorded 2 knocks and scored a run.
  2. 4 players in the Phillies lineup drove in at least 3 runs. This was spearheaded by Franco driving in 6. Altherr drove in 4, Rhys Hoskins drove in 3, and Carlos Santana drove in 3.
  3. Jake Thompson actually managed to record a save despite the fact the Phillies won by 19. A little known fact about the save statistic, you are eligible to record a save if you relieved the starter and went at least the final 3 innings, even if the deficit is greater than 3 runs. Thompson went the final 3 innings and only allowed 1 hit.
  4. 7 of the 8 Phillies position players that started this game recorded an extra base hit. Leadoff second baseman Cesar Hernandez was the lone exception.
  5. 2 separate Marlins pitchers allowed at least 8 runs in this game. Starting pitcher Dillon Peters allowed 9 runs on 9 hits in 2.2 innings. His replacement, Jacob Turner, allowed 8 runs on 6 hits in his lone inning

As if we didn’t already know it was going to be a long year for the Marlins, they get hit with this shit storm of a game. These things can be miserable. I would know. I attended a Red Sox game in 2016 when the Angels came into Fenway and beat their asses 21-2. CJ Cron went 6-for-6 in that game. The Angels managed to score 11 runs in the 7th inning. That 7th inning got so bad that when Red Sox fans finally lost hope, we started trying to see how many runs the Angels could put up. That game ended up turning around the slumping Red Sox’ season, as they got hot shortly after that game and it propelled them to the division title. But these Marlins don’t have the talent the 2016 Red Sox did so 2018 is going to suck for them.

-Speaking of the Red Sox. I mentioned a couple days ago that there would come a time when the starting pitching would need to get picked up by the bats. Little did I know that it would come the very next game. I’m not going to sit here and say Rick Porcello struggled on the mound. It’s hard to call 7.1 innings allowing 3 runs and at one point retiring 17 batters in a row “struggling.” But he got off to a shaky start, allowing 2 runs in the top of the 1st, which for a while to start this season meant a long day for the Red Sox, who have struggled to score runs. Well they shook that REAL fast, as they answered with a 4 spot in both the first and second innings, which included a grand slam by Xander Bogaerts, who had 6 RBI through 2 innings. JD Martinez recorded his first homer as a member of the Red Sox and Rafael Devers also got in on the longball action and the Sox took home their 7th straight win by a score of 10-3.

-I know wrestling is scripted and it’s more a show than a sport, but it’s Wrestlemania tonight and I’m very excited for it and I think it’s the one time where you can put wrestling in your sports blog. I’m just going to go ahead and give my predictions. Samoa Joe returns from injury to win Andre the Giant Memorial Battle Royal, Bayley wins Women’s Battle Royal, Cedric Alexander wins Cruiserweight Championship, Ronda Rousey and Kurt Angle beat Stephanie McMahon and Triple H, Braun Strowman and mystery tag partner (I’m predicting Big Show) win RAW Tag Team Championship, Bludgeon Brothers win Smackdown Tag Team Championship, Finn Balor wins Intercontinental Championship, Randy Orton retains United States Championship, Nia Jax wins RAW Women’s Championship (Carmella tries to cash in her Money in the Bank contract but fails), Asuka wins Smackdown Women’s Championship, Kevin Owens and Sami Zayn beat Daniel Bryan and Shane McMahon to keep their jobs through some shenanigans, Undertaker beats John Cena (not officially a match yet, but come on), Shinsuke Nakamura wins WWE Championship, and Roman Reigns wins Universal Championship. *Pant, pant.* There. Let’s see how I do.

-Not to blow up Conor McGregor’s spot, but…

 

His bail was $50K, which I’m sure he easily could’ve paid out of pocket, so I’m not surprised to see he’s not in jail anymore, but that’s pretty ballsy to sneak into a UFC event after the stunt he pulled. This just adds fuel to the “it was a work” fire that people have been speculating as I doubt McGregor could’ve have just snuck in, being the most recognizable man in UFC right now.

-Well this is one way to get a walkoff win.

I’ve overrun the ball before in my lifetime, but I really have no idea what Eric Hosmer was doing there. It’s not like it was windy, the Astros play in a stadium with a retractable roof and even when that thing is open, the stadium is structured in a way that wind has a tough time getting in and out. You can probably just chalk that up to early season rust, which I guess is an excuse even though spring training began in February. But this must have been the worst game ever to watch. 0-0 in the 10th inning and the only run that scores comes across on a botched popup. Astros fans are probably just happy with the win whereas Padres fans could be just happy they competed with the world champs. But damn that’s a tough box score.

That’s going to do it for this edition of General Sports. Let me know what you think of the topics discussed in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

2018 MLB Season Preview

Thank you all once again for sticking with me and reading my 30 Clubs in 30 Days series. Now is the part it’s all been leading up to: the 2018 MLB Season Preview. In this preview I’m going to use what I wrote in my 30 Clubs in 30 Days series to paint a picture of how this season is going to go. This will range from player rankings to World Series predictions and everything in between. So without further ado, let’s get to it.

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Season Predictions:

Here’s the compilation of the regular season standings from the projected records I did for each team. An asterisk (*) represents the teams that I predict will win the Wild Card spots.

AL East

1. New York Yankees: 98-64

2. Boston Red Sox*: 95-67

3. Baltimore Orioles: 81-81

4. Toronto Blue Jays: 78-84

5. Tampa Bay Rays: 68-94

AL Central

1. Cleveland Indians: 99-63

2. Minnesota Twins: 84-78

3. Kansas City Royals: 74-88

4. Chicago White Sox: 70-92

5. Detroit Tigers: 64-98

AL West

1. Houston Astros: 101-61

2. Anaheim Angels*: 86-76

3. Seattle Mariners: 85-77

4. Texas Rangers: 82-80

5. Oakland Athletics: 77-85

NL East

1. Washington Nationals: 95-67

2. New York Mets: 84-78

3. Philadelphia Phillies: 75-87

4. Atlanta Braves: 71-91

5. Miami Marlins: 62-100

NL Central

1. Chicago Cubs: 94-68

2. Milwaukee Brewers*: 88-74

3. St. Louis Cardinals: 85-77

4. Pittsburgh Pirates: 76-86

5. Cincinnati Reds: 69-93

NL West

1. Los Angeles Dodgers: 100-62

2. Arizona Diamondbacks*: 91-71

3. San Francisco Giants: 85-77

4. Colorado Rockies: 81-81

5. San Diego Padres: 70-92

So based on this information, we can see which teams are ready for success in 2018. Now let’s take a look at my postseason predictions even though game 1 out of 162 hasn’t been played yet.

Wild Card Games:

Boston Red Sox defeat Anaheim Angels

Arizona Diamondbacks defeat Milwaukee Brewers

LDS:

Houston Astros defeat Boston Red Sox

Cleveland Indians defeat New York Yankees

Los Angeles Dodgers defeat Arizona Diamondbacks

Washington Nationals defeat Chicago Cubs

LCS:

Cleveland Indians defeat Houston Astros

Los Angeles Dodgers defeat Washington Nationals

World Series:

Cleveland Indians defeat Los Angeles Dodgers

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Congratulations to the Cleveland Indians on your 2018 World Series victory. In my predictions, the Tribe exorcise their postseason demons from the last couple seasons and win their first World Series since 1948 and third overall. For the Dodgers, their first title since 1988 continues to elude them as they fall in the World Series for the second year in a row. It is also worth mentioning that this matchup is between the two previous World Series losers, as the Indians lost to the Cubs in 2016 and the Dodgers lost to the Astros in 2017.

Power Rankings:

1. Houston Astros

2. Los Angeles Dodgers

3. Cleveland Indians

4. New York Yankees

5. Boston Red Sox

6. Washington Nationals

7. Chicago Cubs

8. Arizona Diamondbacks

9. Milwaukee Brewers

10. Anaheim Angels

11. St. Louis Cardinals

12. Seattle Mariners

13. San Francisco Giants

14. New York Mets

15. Minnesota Twins

16. Texas Rangers

17. Colorado Rockies

18. Baltimore Orioles

19. Toronto Blue Jays

20. Philadelphia Phillies

21. Oakland Athletics

22. Pittsburgh Pirates

23. Kansas City Royals

24. Atlanta Braves

25. Chicago White Sox

26. San Diego Padres

27. Cincinnati Reds

28. Tampa Bay Rays

29. Detroit Tigers

30. Miami Marlins

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Gotta put the reigning champs atop the initial Power Rankings. Plus, they lost virtually nothing in the offseason while getting even stronger with the addition of Gerrit Cole to a pitching rotation that already features two former Cy Young Award winners in Justin Verlander and Dallas Keuchel. I also have to put the Marlins as the worst team in baseball simply for how much they gave up in the offseason. I also don’t think they will be any good for at least another 3 or 4 years, maybe even 5 because of the generally weak prospect pool they received for their troubles. I still can’t believe Giancarlo Stanton didn’t warrant a return of everything the Yankees had in their farm system. The guy hit 59 home runs and was NL MVP last season. Now let’s get into the positional rankings for this season.

Positional Rankings:

Catcher

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1. Buster Posey-San Francisco Giants

2. Gary Sanchez-New York Yankees

3. Salvador Perez-Kansas City Royals

4. Willson Contreras-Chicago Cubs

5. Yadier Molina-St. Louis Cardinals

6. Tucker Barnhart-Cincinnati Reds

7. Mike Zunino-Seattle Mariners

8. Yasmani Grandal-Los Angeles Dodgers

9. Martin Maldonado-Anaheim Angels

10. Brian McCann-Houston Astros

1st Base

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1. Joey Votto-Cincinnati Reds

2. Paul Goldschmidt-Arizona Diamondbacks

3. Freddie Freeman-Atlanta Braves

4. Anthony Rizzo-Chicago Cubs

5. Cody Bellinger-Los Angeles Dodgers

6. Eric Hosmer-San Diego Padres

7. Jose Abreu-Chicago White Sox

8. Ryan Zimmerman-Washington Nationals

9. Greg Bird-New York Yankees

10. Matt Carpenter-St. Louis Cardinals

2nd Base

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1. Jose Altuve-Houston Astros

2. Robinson Cano-Seattle Mariners

3. Daniel Murphy-Washington Nationals

4. Jonathan Schoop-Baltimore Orioles

5. Dustin Pedroia-Boston Red Sox

6. DJ LeMahieu-Colorado Rockies

7. Javy Baez-Chicago Cubs

8. Brian Dozier-Minnesota Twins

9. Jason Kipnis-Cleveland Indians

10. Starlin Castro-Miami Marlins

3rd Base

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1. Kris Bryant-Chicago Cubs

2. Josh Donaldson-Toronto Blue Jays

3. Nolan Arenado-Colorado Rockies

4. Jose Ramirez-Cleveland Indians

5. Anthony Rendon-Washington Nationals

6. Justin Turner-Los Angeles Dodgers

7. Mike Moustakas-Kansas City Royals

8. Alex Bregman-Houston Astros

9. Evan Longoria-San Francisco Giants

10. Adrian Beltre-Texas Rangers

Shortstop

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1. Francisco Lindor-Cleveland Indians

2. Carlos Correa-Houston Astros

3. Corey Seager-Los Angeles Dodgers

4. Manny Machado-Baltimore Orioles

5. Andrelton Simmons-Anaheim Angels

6. Xander Bogaerts-Boston Red Sox

7. Didi Gregorius-New York Yankees

8. Elvis Andrus-Texas Rangers

9. Trea Turner-Washington Nationals

10. Jean Segura-Seattle Mariners

Left Field

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1. Marcell Ozuna-St. Louis Cardinals

2. Christian Yelich-Milwaukee Brewers

3. Yoenis Cespedes-New York Mets

4. Andrew Benintendi-Boston Red Sox

5. Justin Upton-Anaheim Angels

6. Tommy Pham-St. Louis Cardinals

7. Brett Gardner-New York Yankees

8. Corey Dickerson-Pittsburgh Pirates

9. Trey Mancini-Baltimore Orioles

10. Marwin Gonzalez-Houston Astros

Center Field

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1. Mike Trout-Anaheim Angels

2. Charlie Blackmon-Colorado Rockies

3. George Springer-Houston Astros

4. Lorenzo Cain-Milwaukee Brewers

5. Jackie Bradley Jr-Boston Red Sox

6. Byron Buxton-Minnesota Twins

7. Chris Taylor-Los Angeles Dodgers

8. Odubel Herrera-Philadelphia Phillies

9. Ender Inciarte-Atlanta Braves

10. Michael Conforto-New York Mets

Right Field

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1. Bryce Harper-Washington Nationals

2. Aaron Judge-New York Yankees

3. Mookie Betts-Boston Red Sox

4. Andrew McCutchen-San Francisco Giants

5. Yasiel Puig-Los Angeles Dodgers

6. Steven Souza Jr-Arizona Diamondbacks

7. Josh Reddick-Houston Astros

8. Jay Bruce-New York Mets

9. Avisail Garcia-Chicago White Sox

10. Domingo Santana-Milwaukee Brewers

Designated Hitter

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1. Giancarlo Stanton-New York Yankees

2. JD Martinez-Boston Red Sox

3. Edwin Encarnacion-Cleveland Indians

4. Nelson Cruz-Seattle Mariners

5. Khris Davis-Oakland Athletics

Starting Pitcher

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1. Clayton Kershaw-Los Angeles Dodgers

2. Max Scherzer-Washington Nationals

3. Corey Kluber-Cleveland Indians

4. Chris Sale-Boston Red Sox

5. Stephen Strasburg-Washington Nationals

6. Noah Syndergaard-New York Mets

7. Madison Bumgarner-San Francisco Giants

8. Luis Severino-New York Yankees

9. Zack Greinke-Arizona Diamondbacks

10. Robbie Ray-Arizona Diamondbacks

Relief Pitcher

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1. Kenley Jansen-Los Angeles Dodgers

2. Craig Kimbrel-Boston Red Sox

3. Corey Knebel-Milwaukee Brewers

4. Roberto Osuna-Toronto Blue Jays

5. Aroldis Chapman-New York Yankees

6. Andrew Miller-Cleveland Indians

7. Archie Bradley-Arizona Diamondbacks

8. Zach Britton-Baltimore Orioles

9. Wade Davis-Colorado Rockies

10. Pat Neshek-Philadelphia Phillies

And now onto the preseason awards where I award people for things they haven’t done yet and may not even do at all.

American League MVP: Aaron Judge-RF-New York Yankees

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National League MVP: Bryce Harper-RF-Washington Nationals

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American League Cy Young: Chris Sale-Boston Red Sox

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National League Cy Young: Noah Syndergaard-New York Mets

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American League Rookie of the Year: Willy Adames-SS-Tampa Bay Rays

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National League Rookie of the Year: Ronald Acuna-OF-Atlanta Braves

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American League Manager of the Year: Mike Scioscia-Anaheim Angels

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National League Manager of the Year: Craig Counsell-Milwaukee Brewers

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And finally, on to my bold predictions for the 2018 MLB season. Some will be as harmless as saying “I don’t think the Yankees are going to hit as many home runs as everybody says they will,” and others could get me fired if I had a real job. So let’s get to some predictions.

Prediction: Clayton Kershaw will show slight signs of slowing down now that he’s 30 years old, will post an ERA over 2.50, something he hasn’t done since 2012. People will freak out and panic accordingly.

Prediction: The Yankees’ season will be filled with peaks and valleys en route to 98 wins. Considering Judge and Stanton strike out as often as anyone in baseball, this could lead to some rough slumps at times for the two and their team as a result. However, when they’re on, nobody will be able to beat the Yankees.

Prediction: The Baltimore Orioles will trade Manny Machado to a contender at the trade deadline. The Orioles won’t be super competitive in 2018 and Machado’s contract is up at the end of the year. The smart thing to do would be to trade him to a contender and load up on top prospects. Predicted landing spot? Uhhhh…how about the Brewers? I would say the Yankees but the Orioles’ brass has made it clear they’d prefer not to trade Machado within the division.

Prediction: The Yankees will not break the team home run record. This is mainly because I think teams are going to try and pitch the Yankees a little more carefully this season. Knowing the type of power this team possesses, I doubt they’re going to get great pitches to hit. This may lead to higher walk rates for the team, though.

Prediction: The Marlins won’t be nearly as bad as people think. But let’s be honest, the opinions of the Marlins’ talent can’t be much lower at the moment. However every season there’s a team that everyone thinks is going to be the worst and yet somehow they find ways to be just bad, not historically bad.

Prediction: The American League’s home run king will be an Oakland Athletics player. I can envision this happening, considering the power Khris Davis and Matt Olson showed last season. Matt Chapman could also be a sneaky home run threat as well.

Prediction: Mike Trout will finish outside the top 2 in AL MVP voting for the second consecutive season. This isn’t to say that I think Trout will struggle this season. Far from it. Last season was the first time in Trout’s Major League career (since 2012) that he didn’t finish in the top 2 in AL MVP voting and I think it’s going to happen again. As you saw in my awards predictions, I have Aaron Judge taking home top honors and Trout will have to compete with the likes of Jose Altuve, Carlos Correa, Jose Ramirez, Francisco Lindor, Mookie Betts, Josh Donaldson, Giancarlo Stanton, and many, many more.

Prediction: Don Mattingly will be out as Marlins manager before June. This won’t be Mattingly’s fault, nobody can succeed with this roster. However new ownership has pretty much let go of everyone else and Mattingly just logically seems to be the next domino to fall, especially when the Marlins inevitably struggle.

Prediction: Pace of Play will continue to be a topic of discussion and the new mound visit rule will be hated by catchers even though we could probably count the number of issues this rule causes on one hand. The new mound visit rule limits non-pitching-change mound visits to 6 per 9 inning games. There have already been players such as Willson Contreras who are outspoken against this, however if you think about it, catchers don’t really visit the mound all that much, especially if their guy is pitching really well. I don’t think this will cause nearly as many problems as some guys think it might.

Prediction: The newly-signed pitchers (Yu Darvish and Jake Arrieta) will struggle. Darvish has had injury problems throughout his Major League career and Arrieta has been trending downward since winning the 2015 NL Cy Young Award. Im predicting both guys finish with ERA’s in the low-4’s.

So that’s going to do it for my MLB 2018 season preview. Words can’t express how excited I am for Thursday’s Opening Day to roll around, when all 30 teams will be opening on the same day for the first time in over 50 years. Let me know how you think this season’s going to go in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

30 Clubs in 30 Days: San Diego Padres

I’m baaaaaaaaaaaaack. Well, as of writing this, I’m not back from Spring Break just yet, however I’m in a hotel with competent wifi now so I can make another go at 30 Clubs in 30 Days. I won’t be back at school until Sunday night. But in my absence, a LOT in sports has happened. Here are some things that I missed that I REALLY wanted to blog about but didn’t have the opportunity to because of conditions out of my control:

-#16 seeded UMBC upset #1 Virginia in the first ever instance of a 16 beating a 1 in the history of March Madness (1 seeds had been 135-0)

-Kirk Cousins signed with the Vikings, Sam Bradford signed with the Cardinals, Case Keenum signed with the Broncos, and Teddy Bridgewater signed with the Jets

-Bills traded the 21st pick and tackle Cordy Glenn to the Bengals for the 12th pick

-Jets acquire the 3rd pick from the Colts in exchange for the 6th pick and 3 2nd rounders, including 2 in 2018 (OUTSTANDING trade by the Colts, considering that, given the teams picking ahead of them, the move won’t cost them NC State edge rusher Bradley Chubb)

-Allen Robinson signs with the Bears, Sammy Watkins signs with the Chiefs, Jordy Nelson signs with the Raiders, and Michael Crabtree signs with the Ravens

-Richard Sherman signs with the 49ers, Sheldon Richardson signs with the Vikings, Muhammad Wilkerson and Jimmy Graham sign with the Packers

I could go on but the Padres have been patiently waiting for me to tell them how good or bad they’ll be this season for much too long so without further ado, let’s get into this edition of 30 Clubs in 30 Days featuring the San Diego Padres.

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2017 Results:

Record: 71-91, 33 games behind Los Angeles Dodgers, 16 games behind Colorado Rockies for 2nd Wild Card Spot

Notable Offseason Additions: 1B Eric Hosmer, SS Freddy Galvis, 3B Chase Headley, C AJ Ellis, SP Tyson Ross, SP Chris Young, SP Bryan Mitchell

Notable Offseason Subtractions: SS Erick Aybar, RP Kevin Quackenbush, RP Travis Wood, C/RP Christian Bethancourt, 3B Yangervis Solarte, SP Jhoulys Chacin

Best Offensive Player: 1B Eric Hosmer

Best Pitcher: CP Brad Hand

Depth Chart:

C-Austin Hedges, AJ Ellis

1B-Eric Hosmer

2B-Carlos Asuaje, Cory Spangenberg

3B-Chase Headley

SS-Freddy Galvis, Allen Cordoba

LF-Jose Pirela, Hunter Renfroe

CF-Manuel Margot

RF-Wil Myers, Matt Szczur

SP-Clayton Richard, Bryan Mitchell, Dinelson Lamet, Luis Perdomo, Colin Rea, Robbie Erlin, Tyson Ross, Chris Young

Bullpen-Brad Hand (CP), Carter Capps, Kirby Yates, Craig Stammen, Jordan Lyles, Kazuhisa Makita, Phil Maton

Coaching Staff:

Manager-Andy Green (3rd season with Padres)

Hitting Coach-Matt Stairs

Pitching Coach-Darren Balsley

1st Base Coach-Skip Schumaker

3rd Base Coach-Glenn Hoffman

Bench Coach-Mark McGwire

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The Padres had arguably baseball’s thinnest roster in 2017 yet still managed to avoid the basement in the NL West. They had 3 guys on their 25-man roster that were Rule 5 picks, which essentially means they weren’t good enough to be on their previous team’s 40-man roster. But they made some moves in the offseason to try and shore things up. Here’s how they’re projected to line up in 2018.

1. Manuel Margot-CF

2. Freddy Galvis-SS

3. Eric Hosmer-1B

4. Wil Myers-RF

5. Chase Headley-3B

6. Carlos Asuaje/Cory Spangenberg-2B

7. Jose Pirela/Hunter Renfroe-LF

8. Austin Hedges-C

9. Pitcher’s Spot

Eric Hosmer, of course, is the big signing here. The hero of the 2015 World Series, he signed an 8-year $144M deal. I did say that Hosmer was the luckiest hitter in baseball last season, however that doesn’t mean he can’t hit. Far from it. Last season Hosmer hit .318 with 25 home runs and 94 RBI while being worth 4.1 WAR. He’s also just now entering the prime of his career at 28 years old and will be switching to a more hitter-friendly ballpark. Petco Park still tends to favor pitchers even after they moved the fences in a few years ago, but Hosmer’s old stadium, Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, is about as pitcher-friendly as stadiums get so one can expect an uptick in Hosmer’s offensive production in 2018. Wil Myers is the only holdover from last year’s team of note, though. He started at DH for the National League in the 2016 All Star Game but had a down year in terms of his rate stats in 2017. Last year he slashed .243/.328/.464, which is underwhelming, however he did manage to hit a career high 30 home runs while also stealing 20 bags. He’ll be moving from first base back to the outfield with the arrival of Hosmer and will likely be the thumper in this lineup. After those two, though, there isn’t much to go off of. Chase Headley isn’t nearly the player he was the last time he wore a Padres uniform after a disappointing tenure with the Yankees and Manuel Margot is more or less just a speed threat at this stage of his career. Austin Hedges, whom the Padres were very excited about when he was coming up, so far has only shown that he’s an excellent defender behind the plate and hasn’t given any reason to be excited about his bat. This lineup is definitely better than last year’s, though that’s not saying much considering the Padres scored the fewest runs in baseball in 2017.

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The pitching staff leaves a lot to be desired. Clayton Richard is currently their ace and that’s a very bad sign considering he had an ERA of 4.79 last season. He’s a #4 starter at best and he has never cracked 7 K/9 in his Major League career. Dinelson Lamet is a guy that has shown a ton of talent but hasn’t quite put it all together yet. Lamet had an excellent 10.94 K/9 in 21 starts last season, which would’ve ranked 6th in the Majors had he pitched enough innings to qualify (he would’ve trailed only Chris Sale, Robbie Ray, Max Scherzer, Corey Kluber, and Chris Archer). He’s got the stuff to make guys miss, however he’s had trouble with his command and when guys do make contact, the ball tends to go a long way. He had a 4.57 ERA last season while walking over 4 batters per 9 and giving up 1.4 HR/9. There is some talent with this kid, it’s just a matter of whether he can learn to pitch rather than just throw. After that, though, there really isn’t much of note in the Padres’ rotation.

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San Diego’s bullpen has a couple of interesting arms. Brad Hand was mainly just a quality middle reliever for much of his career until he burst onto the scene in 2017. He was the Padres’ lone representative in that year’s All Star game and finished the year with a 2.16 ERA and saved 21 games while striking out almost a dozen batters per 9 innings. He’ll open the season as the team’s closer. Carter Capps is a guy that really intrigues me. He used to have the funkiest windup in the world, where he would basically crow hop from the mound towards the plate and it really helped him dominate in 2015 with the Marlins, where he posted a 1.16 ERA and struck out almost 17 batters per 9. However, he missed all of 2016 due to injury and by that time his funky delivery had been banned by Major League Baseball. His return from injury and a normal windup really hurt him upon his return in 2017. He only pitched 12.1 innings and posted an ERA well over 6 and a K/9 rate of 5.11, nearly a third of what he had posted the last time he pitched. If he can somehow recreate that magic he had in 2015, the back end of the Padres’ bullpen could quietly become one of the most lethal in all of baseball.

Overall, I don’t like the Padres’ chances in 2018. It’s already hard enough that they have to try and follow up a season where they went 71-91 despite having just Wil Myers, but they’re also in a division with 3 playoff teams from last year and a fourth team (the Giants) who had a fluky 2017. It’ll be damn near impossible for the Padres to not find themselves in the cellar in 2018 given their overall lack of Major League talent and the tough division they’ll be playing in. They can look forward to their prospects arriving, though, as they feature the likes of Mackenzie Gore, Luis Urias, Cal Quantrill, Michel Baez, Adrian Morejon, and in a couple years Anderson Espinoza. So the future is bright for the Padres, they just have to suffer through the present.

Projected Record: 70-92, Last in NL West

That’s going to do it for this edition of 30 Clubs in 30 Days. Thanks for the wait on this one, it sucked not being able to write these for a few days, though I survived (the alcohol helped). Join me tomorrow when I discuss the San Francisco Giants, who look to bounce back and continue their trend of success in even-numbered years. Let me know what you think of the Padres’ chances in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

30 Clubs in 30 Days: Kansas City Royals

The NFL Scouting Combine continued, this time the quarterbacks, receivers, and tight ends were the participants. Quick takeaway, Josh Allen is about as perfect a physical specimen as you’re going to find, the problem of course being that his numbers in games were not very good. But again, after the combine is over I’ll have a breakdown of what I saw in addition to that day’s edition of 30 Clubs in 30 Days. So with that, let’s get to the Kansas City Royals.

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2017 Results:

Record: 80-82, 22 games behind Cleveland Indians, 5 games behind Minnesota Twins for 2nd Wild Card Spot

Notable Offseason Additions: 1B Lucas Duda, SP Wily Peralta, RP Blaine Boyer, SP Jesse Hahn, 2B Ryan Goins, OF Tyler Collins

Notable Offseason Subtractions: 1B Eric Hosmer, CF Lorenzo Cain, 3B Mike Moustakas, DH Brandon Moss, SP Jason Vargas, SP Chris Young, RP Mike Minor, RP Joakim Soria, RP Ryan Buchter

Best Offensive Player: C Salvador Perez

Best Pitcher: Danny Duffy

Depth Chart:

C-Salvador Perez, Drew Butera

1B-Lucas Duda

2B-Whit Merrifield, Raul Mondesi

3B-Cheslor Cuthbert, Hunter Dozier

SS-Alcides Escobar

LF-Alex Gordon

CF-Paolo Orlando

RF-Jorge Bonifacio, Jorge Soler (DH)

SP-Danny Duffy, Ian Kennedy, Jason Hammel, Jesse Hahn, Nate Karns

Bullpen-Kelvin Herrera (CP), Wily Peralta, Brandon Maurer, Kevin McCarthy, Miguel Almonte, Brian Flynn

Coaching Staff:

Manager-Ned Yost (9th season with Royals)

Hitting Coach-Terry Bradshaw

Pitching Coach-Cal Eldred

1st Base Coach-Mitch Maier

3rd Base Coach-Mike Jirschele

Bench Coach-Dale Sveum

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Did the Royals win their World Series at the perfect time or what? Basically as soon as they hoisted the Commissioner’s Trophy after Wade Davis struck out Wilmer Flores to end the 2015 season, the Royals have been preparing for this moment and at long last it has come: the Royals need to rebuild. I mean just take a look at that “notable offseason subtractions” list. You could fill a pretty quality roster with those guys. I should mention, though, that Mike Moustakas, as of this writing, is still unsigned so it’s not totally unthinkable that he returns to Kansas City considering they had a 7-year deal ready for Eric Hosmer. But with all those losses to their core, let’s take a look at who is returning to Kansas City.

1. Alcides Escobar-SS

2. Whit Merrifield-2B

3. Alex Gordon-LF

4. Salvador Perez-C

5. Lucas Duda-1B

6. Jorge Bonifacio-RF

7. Paolo Orlando-CF

8. Jorge Soler-DH

9. Cheslor Cuthbert/Hunter Dozier-3B

I’ve definitely seen worse, though I’ve also seen far better. The only guy still of note here is Salvador Perez, whom I consider to be the best all-around catcher in the American League. He’s a skilled hitter, is hard to run on behind the plate, and does a good job working with a pitching staff. The main issue with Perez is how he’s used. Catchers typically require more days off than any other position player but Perez seems to be the exception to that rule, though the Royals’ coaching staff seem to be wising up to this. Perez played in 150 games in 2014 and since then his games played totals have gone down in each year, bottoming out at 129 (which is more typical for catchers) in 2017. You may also notice that his home run totals have gone up in every season of his career, boasting a career high 27 bombs in 2017. This suggests that the extra rest has really aided his long-term level of play. Alex Gordon’s play has dropped significantly since the Royals won the World Series and 2017 was probably his worst season since he was threatening to become a catastrophic bust early in his career. Despite continuing to play the best left field in all of baseball, Gordon was atrocious at the plate in 2017, hitting .208 with 9 home runs, 45 RBI, reached base at a .293 clip, slugged a measly .315 and was replacement level with a 0.0 WAR in 148 games played. Like I said before, Gordon’s defense is excellent, but those numbers at the plate are just unacceptable. Offensively as a whole the Royals were just 24th in baseball in runs scored in 2017 and now they’ve lost their three best offensive threats in Hosmer, Cain, and Moustakas. Kansas City is going to struggle to score runs this season.

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Kauffman Stadium is one of the most pitcher-friendly parks in the game and the Royals typically play very good defense so I’m not too concerned about how they’re going to pitch despite lacking any real star power on the mound. Though to be fair, when they won the World Series in 2015 their Game 1 starter was Edinson Volquez (they did have Johnny Cueto at the time, though he was a midseason addition and he didn’t pitch that well upon joining the Royals). So the Royals are used to succeeding on the mound without superstars in their rotation. Danny Duffy is their ace and he is one of the more underrated pitchers in baseball. Last season he went 9-10 with a 3.81 ERA, a 3.46 FIP, struck out 8 batters per 9 innings, and only let up 0.80 HR/9. He has plenty of arm talent and will more than likely get the Opening Day nod for the Royals provided he can stay healthy, which has been an issue as he’s only qualified for the Major League minimum in innings pitched once in his career (2016). The rest of the rotation is made up of some filler guys, such as Ian Kennedy and Jason Hammel. They did acquire Jesse Hahn from the A’s in exchange for Brandon Moss, which provides them with some decent depth in their starting rotation, however they lack a true ace, just a bunch of #3-caliber starting pitchers. But again, Kauffman Stadium is very favorable towards pitchers so I don’t think a lack of star power is going to hinder these guys too much.

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There’s a lot to be desired with the Royals’ bullpen. Closer Kelvin Herrera is extremely talented, as his fastball is consistently around 98 mph, but he had a down year in 2017 as he carried a 4.25 ERA a year after back-to-back 2.7 ERA campaigns. Herrera also doesn’t strike out nearly as many batters as you’d expect for a guy who throws as hard as he does, as he’s typically somewhere in the 8 K/9 range and has eclipsed 10 K/9 in a season just twice (2013 and 2016). After him, there’s not much. Wily Peralta was the Opening Day starter for the Brewers a couple times but he hasn’t had a sub-4 ERA since 2014 and last season was particularly disastrous as he had a 7.85 ERA in 8 starts before moving to the bullpen to make 11 more appearances. Brandon Maurer is a talented reliever but 2017 was his second season where he carried an ERA over 6, though his FIP was sub-4, suggesting he was significantly better than his ERA might suggest. There still is much left to be desired in this Royals bullpen however the Kauffman Stadium effect does apply here and will likely help their overall numbers.

Overall, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Royals somewhere near the cellar of the AL Central. In fact, I’d probably put them there if the Tigers weren’t looking so terrible. The Royals aren’t going to be very good, but I don’t expect them to be abysmal. Ned Yost is a good enough manager to where I think he could help this team steal some series’. I think the best case scenario for this Royals team is that they’ll be pesky and cause some teams problems, however they won’t be much more than that and will be looking to try and secure a high draft pick.

Projected Finish: 74-88, 3rd in AL Central

That’s going to do it for this edition of 30 Clubs in 30 Days. Join me tomorrow where I preview the Los Angeles Dodgers, who were one win away from winning their first World Series since 1988. Let me know what you think of the Royals’ chances in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

General Sports: February 18

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-Utah Jazz rookie Donovan Mitchell won the Slam Dunk contest in what was a decent event compared to years’ past. Far from being the worst but not nearly as good as the one in Toronto two years ago. There were two dunks where my eyes popped out of my head, that being from Dennis Smith Jr and Larry Nance Jr. Here’s Smith’s.

That one was my personal favorite, followed closely by this one from Larry Nance Jr, which gets bonus points for creativity for me.

Nance’s father, Larry Sr, was the first ever winner of the Slam Dunk contest and paid homage to his old man with his first dunk. Fun fact, the people who helped dress him were some clothes magicians I actually saw perform during the halftime show of Indiana vs Michigan State a couple weeks ago. They’re extremely talented. Another fun fact, Donovan Mitchell went to my high school’s arch rival, Brewster Academy. I actually got to watch him play in high school but I was somehow more focused on one of his teammates than I was him and I’m kicking myself for it. I was focusing more on Isaac Copeland, who ended up committing to Georgetown without realizing the future Slam Dunk Contest winner was playing on the same team. Copeland is currently at Nebraska after transferring from the Hoyas. Here’s my favorite dunk from Mitchell on the night:

And here was my favorite dunk from the guy I thought would win but ended up finishing last, Victor Oladipo.

What ended up hurting him in the competition was the fact that he couldn’t land his first dunk and once that happened you knew he was done. But it was nice seeing him pay homage to the Black Panther movie that came out on Friday. Plus he received the mask from the Black Panther himself, Chadwick Boseman, who also played Jackie Robinson in the movie “42.” From what I’ve been able to gather, not only is Black Panther allegedly really freaking good, but it’s supposedly supposed to be really important to the black community. Plus that’s a fucking awesome mask. Probably the best superhero mask there is in my humblest of opinions.

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-I royally messed up in my All Star Weekend picks blog. For the Skills Challenge, I forgot to list two participants: Bulls forward Lauri Markkanen and Nets guard Spencer Dinwiddie. Well I got my comeuppance because guess who were the final two. If you guessed Joel Embiid and Lou Williams like I did, you’d be wrong. It was Markannen and Dinwiddie. Though Embiid didn’t make the finals not from a lack of trying.

CHEATER! Oh well, it didn’t end up mattering, Markkanen ended up burying the final 3-pointer ahead of Embiid to advance to the finals. He eventually lost to Dinwiddie, who basically just won the “who the Hell are you?” award. I mean I feel like I’ve heard his name in passing, but nothing really of substance. I wouldn’t have been able to tell you what team he played for had he not been in the competition in a Nets jersey. But nonetheless, congrats to Dinwiddie.

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-I damn near freaking nailed my 3-point contest prediction. Devin Booker not only won it, but in the final round he broke the record for points in a single round with 28, defeating Klay Thompson (who I accurately predicted would be a finalist) and Tobias Harris (who I did not expect to make it this far). I had Paul George ahead of Harris, but George went and had arguably the worst 3-point contest round I’ve ever seen, scoring just 9 points. And people say that the Lakers are going to go after him hard, he can’t even shoot in their building! That probably will make very little difference, but it’s still fun to bitch about. But congratulations to Booker, who continues to be one of the more underrated players in the league.

-Poor Bob Huggins. Note to anybody who puts on dress clothes: your belt is extremely important, no matter if it’s going to be covered or not.

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-One of the most confusing moves I’ve ever seen occurred while the 3-point shootout was happening. The Tampa Bay Rays acquired first baseman CJ Cron from the Angels (which I expected to happen, not necessarily Cron winding up on the Rays, but Cron being on the move after the arrival of Shoehei Ohtani) for a player to be named later. The confusing part is that the Rays then promptly DFA’d Corey Dickerson, who was their DH and leadoff hitter last season. Uhhh, wtf Rays? Dickerson was arguably your best hitter last season. Dickerson was the starting DH for the AL in last year’s All Star game. He was hitting over .320 at the time, however he hit .240 after the break to bring his line to a more than respectable .282 with 27 home runs and 62 RBI. Plus he’s 28 years old, in the athletic prime of his career, and he’s only owed about $5M. I guarantee you he won’t be in limbo for long as teams will be rushing to claim him off waivers. But a really bizarre situation. CJ Cron is talented, believe me, I know. I was there when the Angels beat the Red Sox 21-2 and Cron went 6-6 with 2 home runs and was a triple away from the cycle. But you’re trying to tell me he’s a better option at DH than Dickerson? Sure Cron is only going to cost about $2.3M after his arbitration hearing with the Angels in January, but his numbers last year were not nearly good enough to warrant DFA’ing Dickerson over. He hit .248 with 16 home runs and 56 RBI. The DFA’ing of Dickerson in response to adding Cron continues to make less and less sense to me the more I think about it. Not only is Cron the same age as Dickerson with significantly less overall production and at half the cost, but there was definitely room on the roster for both guys. Right now the Rays first baseman is slated to be Brad Miller, who can play pretty much any position so you have some flexibility with him. You could very easily have plugged in Cron at first then put Miller at second and had Daniel Robertson come off the bench like where I think his talent merits while still having Dickerson as your DH. There has to be something going on with Dickerson that we don’t know about to warrant this move.

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-Shortly after acquiring CJ Cron, the Rays continued to make moves, this time trading pitcher Jake Odorizzi to the Twins for a package that includes shortstop prospect Jermaine Palacios. Originally it was believed that Dickerson would be a part of this deal, but it doesn’t appear that he is. But Odorizzi is a good acquisition for the Twins, who badly need starting pitchers. He’s been battling injuries over the last few seasons, but when healthy I think he’s a quality #3 option, maybe even a #2. Last season, in 28 starts, Odorizzi went 10-8 with a 4.14 ERA but he’s capable of better, as he went 9-9 with a 3.35 ERA in 2015. Right now the only quality starter on the Twins is Ervin Santana, who is 35 years old right now. Jose Berrios is extremely talented, but he hasn’t been able to put it altogether yet. Odorizzi’s a solid guy to have around as you try and build your pitching staff.

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-And finally we have the biggest bit of baseball news of all. I had already scheduled this article when he was signed so I had to hop right back in and make some edits. But Eric Hosmer has finally signed with the San Diego Padres on an 8-year deal worth $144M. He signed the deal at around midnight, or 9:00 west coast time. The deal is pretty front-heavy, as Hosmer will average $20M a season for the first five years of the deal, after which he’ll be able to opt out. After those 5 years, he’ll be making $13M a year plus a $5M signing bonus. I actually like this layout because it better protects the team from those nasty back-loaded contracts that end up biting them in the ass down the line. Plus for Hosmer he’ll be making his money the first five years of the deal, then if he decides to remain in San Diego, he’d be taking a paycut at a time when his skills will likely have deteriorated, as he will be 33 when the opt-out option kicks in and likely headed towards a decline. Hosmer had an excellent season in 2017, hitting .318 with 25 home runs and 94 RBI for the Royals, though I did mention buyer beware, as I rated him as the luckiest hitter in the majors last season. Hosmer and the Padres have been linked for a while now and I think Hosmer was just trying to wait out the Padres for a larger deal for as long as he could before deciding to sign with Spring Training starting up. Here’s what the Padres lineup looks like with their new first baseman, though it is worth noting that their best hitter Wil Myers currently occupies that spot. I’m willing to bet that Myers returns to the outfield, though, where he began his career.

1. Manuel Margot-CF

2. Freddy Galvis-SS

3. Eric Hosmer-1B

4. Wil Myers-LF

5. Chase Headley-3B

6. Cory Spangenberg-2B

7. Austin Hedges-C

8. Hunter Renfroe-RF

9. Pitcher’s Spot

That’s probably not going to be enough to keep the Padres out of the cellar in the NL West this season, but if the younger guys, particularly Margot and Hedges, develop the way the organization hopes, this could be an exciting team in the near future. As for the Royals, the team Hosmer’s leaving, they had to have expected this to happen, though they reportedly did try and bring him back while the market wasn’t biting. Hosmer was a big part of their championship run in 2015 including his famous mad dash that tied up Game 5 and sent it to extra innings, a game that the Royals ultimately won, leading to their first World Series title since 1985. Here’s the play in question.

That play will forever live on in Royals lore. But with Hosmer signing with the Padres, that pretty much just leaves JD Martinez, Jake Arrieta, and Mike Moustakas as the biggest free agents still without a team. Spring Training games start on Thursday, fellas, let’s get a move on.

That’s going to do it for this edition of General Sports. Let me know what you thought of NBA All Star Weekend and the Rays’ roster moves in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

Milwaukee Brewers Strike Twice

Thank God for the Brewers. Never thought I’d ever utter a sentence like that, but here we are. The Brewers have pulled off not one, but TWO major acquisitions today, as they signed free agent outfielder Lorenzo Cain to a 5 year $80M deal and acquired outfielder Christian Yelich from the Miami Marlins in exchange for prospects Lewis Brinson, Monte Harrison, Isan Diaz, and Jordan Yamamoto. Brinson is the big one, as he was Milwaukee’s top-rated prospect. I actually think the haul the Marlins got for Yelich was better than the one they got for Giancarlo Stanton if I’m being completely honest.

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As for Lorenzo Cain, he returns to the team that originally drafted him in the 17th round of the 2004 MLB Draft. Cain had been a part of the Brewers organization for about 6-7 years before being the centerpiece of their blockbuster trade for Zack Greinke from the Royals in 2011. Cain was a big part of the back-to-back AL champion Royals teams in 2014 and 2015, the latter of which culminated in a World Series championship. He was their 3-hole hitter and finished third in the AL MVP voting in 2015. In 2017, Cain hit an even .300 with 15 home runs, 49 RBI, and stole 26 bases while sporting a .363 OBP and .440 SLG. He also had 5 DRS in centerfield, which was actually the lowest of his career (he’s had as good as 18 DRS in 2013) and finished with a WAR of 4.1.

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Christian Yelich is one of the brightest young stars in the majors, as he was the 3-hole hitter for Team USA’s World Baseball Classic championship-winning team and traditionally batted at the top half of a Marlins lineup that featured the likes of Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna. Yelich had another strong season in 2017 as he hit .282 with 18 home runs and 81 RBI and stole 16 bases. He reached base at a .369 clip and slugged .439. He had a DRS of -6 in centerfield this season however he’s shown that he’s significantly above average as a defender in left, as he had a DRS of 13 in both 2013 and 2014. He ended up being worth 4.5 WAR for the Marlins. Let’s take a look at what the Brewers look like with their two new star outfielders.

1. Lorenzo Cain-CF

2. Eric Thames-1B

3. Christian Yelich-LF

4. Travis Shaw-3B

5. Domingo Santana/Ryan Braun-RF

6. Stephen Vogt-C

7. Orlando Arcia-SS

8. Eric Sogard-2B

9. Pitcher’s Spot

That has the potential to be a DEADLY lineup, especially if guys like Thames and Shaw can replicate their breakout 2017 performances. Based on this lineup, I think the Brewers can compete with the Cubs for the NL Central title. They’re going to need another pitcher if they REALLY want to show it, though. Aside from Jimmy Nelson there isn’t much in the Brewers rotation and we can’t even be 100% sure that Nelson wasn’t a fluke last season.

As for the Marlins, after trading Yelich, they have officially traded all three of their stud outfielders. First it was Giancarlo Stanton to the Yankees for a washing machine, then it was Marcell Ozuna to the Cardinals for some solid prospects, and now Yelich to the Brewers for the best prospects they had to offer. And people forget they also traded Dee Gordon to the Mariners a while back. However this team now has the looks of a unit that anticipates finishing last in the NL East, maybe even all of baseball. Here’s how they look without their three star outfielders.

1. Starlin Castro-2B

2. Martin Prado-3B

3. JT Realmuto-C

4. Justin Bour-1B

5. Derek Dietrich-LF

6. JT Riddle/Miguel Rojas-SS

7. Lewis Brinson-CF

8. Magneuris Sierra-RF

9. Pitcher’s Spot

Two of the prospects they acquired in their trades, Brinson and Sierra, are now the two best outfielders they have to offer. I took the liberty of putting Dietrich in left since he’s kind of a super utility guy. Plus JT Realmuto has said that he wants out and so has Starlin Castro even though he hasn’t played a game for the Marlins yet, mainly because he doesn’t want to be part of another rebuild like he was with the Cubs. Reportedly the Nationals are interested in Realmuto, I haven’t heard anything on Castro. But yeah, I don’t anticipate this team winning very many games in 2018.

As for the Royals, Cain was likely the first domino to fall amongst their core from their 2015 World Series championship team. Eric Hosmer, Mike Moustakas, and to a lesser extent Alcides Escobar are all likely to sign elsewhere, basically leaving Salvador Perez and Alex Gordon all by themselves. Here’s what the Royals look like, assuming they can’t resign any of these guys.

1. Billy Burns-CF

2. Cheslor Cuthbert-3B

3. Alex Gordon-LF

4. Salvador Perez-C

5. Paulo Orlando-RF

6. Brandon Moss-1B

7. Jorge Soler-DH

8. Whit Merrifield-2B

9. Raul Mondesi-SS

Of course, this is assuming none of the other guys return. Reportedly the Royals have made a pretty good offer to Eric Hosmer. But as it stands right now, this is how they look heading into the 2018 season. Not great. It wouldn’t surprise me in the slightest if this team finished last in the AL, just like the Marlins in the NL. The worst part about Cain leaving is that it was through free agency so the Royals couldn’t even get anything in return for him. Though I’m sure the World Series victory will be fine for an organization that historically isn’t used to a whole lot of winning.

But yeah, thank you Brewers for igniting some life into this offseason. I’ve said this several times and it’s never seemed to work, but hopefully this knocked over the first domino and now others will fall in behind them. Looking at you, JD Martinez and basically every pitcher on the market.

MLB Free Agent Power Rankings

Before I get into the power rankings, I want to just say Rest in Peace to Roy Halladay, who died in a plane crash on Tuesday. He was 40 years old. Halladay was a husband and father of two and was widely considered to be one of the best human beings in baseball, as he was very involved in the community, from charity work to coaching little league. He was also a phenomenal pitcher for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies, winning the Cy Young Award in 2003 and 2010, an 8-time All Star, and the embodiment of a workhorse. Since 1998, when Halladay made his Major League debut, no pitcher has thrown more complete games than Halladay’s 67. He retired in 2013 and that number since 1998 still hasn’t been caught. For a while, it was pretty safe to say that Halladay was the best pitcher in baseball, as his stretch between 2008-2011 was some of the most dominant years of pitching I’ve ever seen. His 2010 season was particularly special, as it included a perfect game against the Marlins and a no hitter in his postseason debut (second in postseason history) against the Cincinnati Reds in the NLDS. Rest in Peace, Roy Halladay (1977-2017), you will be missed by all.

On a happier note, free agency has officially kicked off in Major League Baseball and speculation as to who’s headed where and who is due for a big contract will be the talk of the next four months or so. This year’s class is essentially the warmup to the Bryce Harper/Manny Machado class of 2018 that will be sure to shake the foundation of baseball to its core, but it is still loaded with plenty of star power. So without further ado, let’s get into the rankings.

#10. Zack Cozart-Shortstop

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photo credit: FirstAndMonday

Zack Cozart has been the shortstop for the Cincinnati Reds for a few years now but has battled injuries and hasn’t played a full season since 2014. However when he has been healthy, he’s been very effective, especially in the last two seasons, 2017 being his best. He hit .297 this season in 122 games with 24 home runs and 63 RBI while also playing some solid defense, which accumulated to a WAR of 5.0. He also earned his first All Star nod, and in turn, won a donkey from Joey Votto. You read that correctly. Here’s the story. Cozart may not be a household name, but he’s been playing the best baseball of his career and whichever team signs him will have themselves a heck of a player, provided he can stay healthy.

Projected Team: Signs with New York Mets

#9. Carlos Santana-First Baseman/DH

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photo credit: Waiting for Next Year

Carlos Santana is an oddity mainly because he often batted leadoff for the Cleveland Indians despite being a first baseman that lacks speed. It’s mainly because he draws a LOT of walks thanks to having one of the best eyes for the plate in baseball. He’s been really consistent these last two seasons, as he batted .259 in both 2016 AND 2017, and his on base percentage was .366 in 2016 and .363 in 2017. His power numbers were down from 2016, he hit a career-high 34 in 2016 and 23 in 2017, but he is still a threat to go yard if a pitcher hangs one on him.

Projected Team: Returns to the Cleveland Indians

#8. Jay Bruce-Outfielder

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photo credit: Sporting News

Jay Bruce has spent the majority of his career with the Cincinnati Reds but since being traded to the Mets in 2016, he’s had some of his best success at the plate. He hit 33 home runs between the Reds and Mets in 2016, then hit 36 bombs and drove in 101 runs between the Mets and Indians in 2017. He has only hit fewer than 20 home runs in a season once (2014) and that was by far the worst year of his career. He also has one of the strongest outfield arms in the game and many teams are hesitant to run against him.

Projected Team: Signs with the Toronto Blue Jays

#7. Mike Moustakas-Third Baseman

MLB: Detroit Tigers at Kansas City Royals

photo credit: MLB Trade Rumors

Moustakas had a MONSTROUS offensive breakout this season, hitting 38 home runs (his previous best was 22) and 85 RBI while hitting a solid .272. Moustakas was a key cog in the Royals’ 2015 championship run, and his defense has typically been a major positive at the hot corner (however it has been steadily trending downward since 2012). Moustakas is one of four players on this list from the 2015 champion Royals team (three of which were still with KC at the end of the 2017 season) and he will be a big factor for whomever signs him.

Projected Team: Signs with San Francisco Giants

#6. Wade Davis-Closing Pitcher

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photo credit: Bleed Cubbie Blue

Wade Davis is one of a plethora of pitchers with promise who flamed out as starters, but once they moved to the bullpen, they rescue their careers. Davis is probably the best example of this and has been absolutely dominant since he was named the closer of the Royals in 2015 and he was a big boost for the Cubs’ bullpen in 2017. Davis was Chicago’s only All Star in 2017 and had a 2.30 ERA, which was actually his WORST since he became a reliever in 2014. Just let that sink in.

Projected Team: Returns to Chicago Cubs

#5. Lorenzo Cain-Outfielder

MLB: San Francisco Giants at Kansas City Royals

photo credit: Baseball Prospectus

Lorenzo Cain has been pretty consistent since 2014, his average typically hovering around the .300 mark with moderate power while playing some solid defense in centerfield. I wouldn’t say Cain is an elite player, but he’s a good one who will be an impact on any lineup, best part being you pretty much know what you’re going to get out of him. Health was an issue for him in 2016 but he was totally healthy in 2017, playing in 155 games.

Projected Team: Signs with New York Yankees

#4. Eric Hosmer-First Baseman

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photo credit; The Inquisitr

Eric Hosmer is the last of 4-straight members of the 2015 Royals on this list. While I did note in my luck blog that he was probably the luckiest hitter in baseball in 2017, he is still one of the better first basemen in the game. He’s coming off his best season as a pro, slashing .318/.385/.498, all career highs, and tied his career high of 25 home runs while playing in all 162 games. He’s a below-average defender at first base, but that’s probably the one position where I don’t care too much about defense, unless they are absolutely abysmal.

Projected Team: Signs with Boston Red Sox

#3. Jake Arrieta-Starting Pitcher

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photo credit: Fan Rag Sports

Jake Arrieta’s second half of 2015 was perhaps the most dominant stretch of pitching I have ever seen. It’s kind of been downhill since, though it is almost impossible to do much better. He’s still one of the game’s better pitchers, as he had an ERA of 3.53, his worst since joining the Cubs, but still better than what you get out of most pitchers. He was hurt, however, by the fact that opponents had a .279 BABIP against him, a career-worst, which may suggest that he just got unlucky last season.

Projected Team: Signs with Texas Rangers

#2. Yu Darvish-Starting Pitcher

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photo credit: Sports Illustrated

Yu Darvish had a terrible showing in the Dodgers’ World Series loss to the Astros but that shouldn’t put a damper on peoples’ opinions on his abilities as a pitcher. When healthy, Darvish is one of the most electrifying righties in baseball. He had a 3.86 ERA on the year, 3.38 since his trade to the Dodgers from the Rangers at the Trade Deadline, as he played his first full season since missing much of 2014, all of 2015, and much of 2016 due to Tommy John surgery. He’s never struck out fewer than 10 batters per 9 innings in his career and his control has gotten better each season, as he has cut down on his walks per 9 every year (technically it did go up by 0.02 from 2016-17, but that’s so minuscule that I think it’s fair to overlook).

Projected Team: Resigns with Los Angeles Dodgers

#1. JD Martinez-Outfielder

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photo credit: Sports from the Basement

Holy shit did JD Martinez have a big year. Between the Tigers and Diamondbacks (where he was traded at the Trade Deadline), Martinez hit .303 with 45 home runs and 104 RBI, numbers that would easily have him in the MVP discussion had he not switched leagues. 29 of those 45 bombs came in his 2 months in Arizona, as he helped catapult the Diamondbacks to a playoff run. Martinez missed the first month of the season due to injury but upon his return he was unstoppable, and I think it’s fair to expect that he continue to thrive, as he only just turned 30 in August.

Projected Team: Resigns with Arizona Diamondbacks

Others that just missed the list: Todd Frazier-Third Baseman, Eduardo Nunez-Utility, Alex Cobb-Starting Pitcher, Carlos Gonzalez-Outfielder, Jonathan Lucroy-Catcher

Those are my free agency rankings for this season. Agree with my list? Disagree? Let me know in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

Measuring Luck in Baseball

So I’m sure you’ve seen the stats on certain players and thought “this guy can’t be that good, can he?” Or you’ve seen those one-year wonders that never came close to that level of production ever again. A lot of times, you can go back to advanced metrics to try and project who is due for a big breakout season or who might be in for a major decline. I’m going to try and do that here by using statistics to determine who the luckiest and unluckiest hitters in Major League Baseball are. Now I will preface this by saying that this may not be entirely accurate, as I have no way of gaining stats such as “bad hops that turn sure outs into base hits” or “plays where the defender robbed you of a base hit” unless I go back and literally watch every single at bat of every player in the Majors. That’s just not happening, I’ve got stuff to do. I will however, use the stats that I have gained from Fangraphs.com to try and find the best way to paint a picture for you as to who is the luckiest hitter in the game. Ideally, there would be a way for me to combine all of the following stats I will be using into one encompassing number, but my skills as a statistician just aren’t at that level. I will more or less be taking each stat that I think is important in determining luck and giving you the players who fall into these categories. So without further ado, let’s dive into the numbers.

BABIP

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Avisail Garcia had a career year in 2017, could he be due for regression? (photo credit: Detroit Free Press)

BABIP stands for “Batting Average on Balls In Play” and basically measures what a player’s batting average would be if you were to take their strikeouts and home runs out of the equation. This is probably the best stat we have towards measuring luck as it shows how often guys are getting hits when defenders have a chance at making a play on the ball. Here are the Top 10 players in the 2017 season according to BABIP:

  1. Avisail Garcia-CHW: .392
  2. Charlie Blackmon-COL: .371
  3. Jose Altuve-HOU: .370
  4. Tommy Pham-STL: .368
  5. Tim Beckham-TBR/BAL: .365
  6. Domingo Santana-MIL: .363
  7. Chris Taylor-UTIL-LAD: .361
  8. Aaron Judge-NYY: .357
  9. Marcell Ozuna-MIA: .355
  10. Dee Gordon-MIA: .354

Now a few of these guys I can safely say is due to skill at the plate, namely Blackmon and Altuve (my two MVP picks for this season) because they’ve been ranking highly on these lists for some time now. It’s guys like Garcia, Pham, and Beckham who make me nervous just simply because I hadn’t seen production like this out of them prior to 2017. Now for the Top 10 Worst BABIPs in the majors this season:

  1. Rougned Odor-TEX: .224
  2. Todd Frazier-CHW/NYY: .226
  3. Curtis Granderson-NYM/LAD: .228
  4. Maikel Franco-PHI: .234
  5. Jose Bautista-TOR: .239
  6. Ian Kinsler-DET: .244
  7. Scott Schebler-CIN: .248
  8. Albert Pujols-ANA: .249
  9. Joey Gallo-TEX: .250
  10. Yangervis Solarte-SDP: .258

Todd Frazier has been very high on this list for the last few years now yet he is still a productive player, being worth a WAR of 3.0 this season, which is above average. You’ll also notice some other big names on this list, such as Jose Bautista, Ian Kinsler, and future Hall of Famer Albert Pujols. Pujols’ production has been on a steep decline ever since he signed a huge contract with the Angels back in 2012 so his inclusion isn’t unfathomable here. It’s guys like Kinsler being on this list that surprised me.

Quality of Contact

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Joey Gallo was about as all-or-nothing a hitter as you will find in 2017 (photo credit: Fan Rag Sports)

Typically when a ball is hit hard, it suggests that the hitter got a good piece of it or squared it up really well. We all see those plays where a guy absolutely smokes the ball and it’s hit right at the third baseman for a quick out, which affects their batting average the same way as a strikeout despite not missing the ball. This is an imperfect tool because sometimes, you get guys like Giancarlo Stanton who are just flat out stronger than everyone and could hit a hard hit ball on a check swing. A ball is considered hard hit when it travels at roughly 100 mph off the bat. Below is a list of the guys who hit the ball hardest in 2017. I want you to keep in mind that the best hitters have contact rates of about 40-45-15:

Player                           Hard Contact                       Medium Contact                  Soft Contact

Joey Gallo-TEX                        46.4%                                        38.9%                                  14.7%

Aaron Judge-NYY                    45.3%                                        43.5%                                  11.2%

Paul Goldschmidt-ARI          44.3%                                         44.3%                                  11.3%

Corey Seager-LAD                  44%                                           43.1%                                 12.9%

Nicholas Castellanos-DET      43.4%                                     45.1%                                  11.5%

Cody Bellinger-LAD               43%                                          43%                                      14%

Miguel Cabrera-DET             42.5%                                       47.5%                                   9.9%

Matt Carpenter-STL            42.2%                                       45.7%                                    12.1%

Khris Davis-OAK                  42.1%                                        44.4%                                    13.5%

Chris Davis-BAL                  41.5%                                        45.7%                                   12.8%

One thing I want to draw your attention to on this list is Joey Gallo. Yes, he hit the ball hard the most consistently, but he also had the highest percentage of softly hit balls among guys in the top 10 as well as the lowest percentage of medium hit balls in this group. Gallo was a go-big-or-go-home type of swinger this season, as also evidenced by his 41 home runs and 196 strikeouts on the season. Here are the guys who hit the ball softly the most frequently in 2017:

Player                      Hard Contact                         Medium Contact              Soft Contact

Jose Peraza-CIN              21.4%                                        52%                                      26.6%

Jose Reyes-NYM                26.7%                                        47.2%                                    26.1%

Manuel Margot-SDP         25.4%                                     48.7%                                    25.9%

Yangervis Solarte-SDP      31.1%                                     43.8%                                   25.2%

Billy Hamilton-CIN          16%                                         59%                                      25%

Dee Gordon-MIA               16.1%                                      59.2%                                  24.7%

Didi Gregorius-NYY         23.1%                                       52.4%                                 24.4%

Odubel Herrera-NYY       29.4 %                                     46.3%                                  24.4%

Cesar Hernandez-PHI      22.1%                                    54.4%                                  23.5%

Todd Frazier-CHW/NYY             32.2%                                      44.6%                                 23.2%

A few guys on this list won’t be considered for “luckiest” or “unluckiest” because a lot of times this soft contact is a result of them playing to their speed. Guys like Billy Hamilton and Dee Gordon often drop down bunts because they are freakishly fast, so using their soft contact against them isn’t really fair in this case. You may also notice a couple guys in the top 10 softest hit balls who were also in the top 10 worst BABIP: Todd Frazier and Yangervis Solarte, so you can pretty much rule these two out for consideration for “unluckiest.” They just aren’t hitting the ball hard and it’s hurting them.

Pop Up %

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Had Freddie Freeman not missed a large chunk of the season due to injury, he may have been a leading candidate for NL MVP (photo credit: AJC.com)

Pop ups can be killers and often happens when a guy tries to get the ball airborne and dips his back shoulder a little too much. I often find that pop ups can be a good indicator of a guy who is due for a big home run season, because usually when the ball is popped up, the hitter got a little too far under the ball. And when they hit those balls that are skied in the air with terrific hang time, you can probably guess that if they squared it up properly, it’d be going a long way at a more horizontal level. It will just take a little bit of tweaking in their swing to turn those pop-ups into bombs. I must also clarify that a ball is considered a pop up as long as it remains in the infield or fieldable by an infielder. Here are the guys who popped out most frequently:

  1. Todd Frazier-CHW/NYY-18.5%
  2. Jose Reyes-NYM-18.1%
  3. Tommy Joseph-PHI-18.1%
  4. Byron Buxton-MIN-17.7%
  5. Yangervis Solarte-SDP-17.4%
  6. Giancarlo Stanton-MIA-16.9%
  7. Alex Bregman-HOU-16.7%
  8. Jose Bautista-TOR-16.5%
  9. Maikel Franco-PHI-16.3%
  10. Jonathan Schoop-BAL-16%

I should also note that Schoop was number 11 in soft contact. This surprised me, especially considering the fact that he hit 32 home runs this season. But once again, Frazier and Solarte appear on a list they don’t want to appear on for futility. I was surprised at first to see Stanton on this list, but then I got to thinking about it and it started to make sense as, considering the guy was chasing 61 home runs, he probably hit a few pop ups trying to get to that number. Here we have the guys who hit the fewest pop ups in 2017:

  1. Freddie Freeman-ATL-0%
  2. Joey Votto-CIN-0.5%
  3. Shin-Soo Choo-TEX-0.9%
  4. Nicholas Castellanos-DET-1.6%
  5. Domingo Santana-MIL-2.1%
  6. Miguel Cabrera-DET-2.5%
  7. Christian Yelich-MIA-2.5%
  8. Buster Posey-SFG-2.8%
  9. Chris Davis-BAL-2.9%
  10. Dee Gordon-MIA-2.9%

Freddie Freaking Freeman didn’t hit a single popup this season. That’s just unbelievable to me. That’s a guy who is totally fundamentally sound with his swing on every single hack he takes. Not surprised to see Dee Gordon on this list. As a guy who bunted for more hits than anybody else (he had 18 bunt hits, next closest was Buxton at 11), I’m sure he was trying to hit the ball on the ground as much as humanly possible. This is how I imagine a discussion between Gordon and Marlins manager Don Mattingly would go.

Line Drives

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Daniel Murphy has hit .334 since joining the Nationals in 2016 (photo credit: CBS Sports)

This is the last stat we will consider when trying to determine luck. There really isn’t a definitive way to consider a line drive except by the eye test. I’m not going over every single swing to clarify information, so I trust the guys at Fangraphs have these numbers up to par. Typically a line drive is affiliated with hitting the ball perfectly. Here is a list of the guys who had the highest percentage of line drives in 2017:

  1. Daniel Murphy-WAS-27.6%
  2. Domingo Santana-MIL-27.4%
  3. Miguel Cabrera-DET-27.3%
  4. Jed Lowrie-OAK-27.1%
  5. Shin-Soo Choo-TEX-25%
  6. Joe Mauer-MIN-24.9%
  7. Chase Headley-NYY-24.9%
  8. Corey Seager-LAD-24.8%
  9. DJ LeMahieu-COL-24.7%
  10. Nicholas Castellanos-DET-24.5%

Not surprised to see Daniel Murphy on this list. The guy hits lasers and ever since 2015 he’s been one of the most consistently solid hitters in the game. Chase Headley was a bit of a surprise for me, I always knew he was more of a doubles guy but he’d been having his struggles with the Yankees this season. Now we have the worst at hitting line drives in 2017:

  1. Hunter Pence-SFG-13.4%
  2. Javy Baez-CHC-15.4%
  3. Manny Machado-BAL-15.8%
  4. Giancarlo Stanton-MIA-16%
  5. Mark Trumbo-BAL-16.1%
  6. Yasiel Puig-LAD-16.1%
  7. Scott Schebler-CIN-16.2%
  8. Rougned Odor-TEX-16.3%
  9. Yangervis Solarte-SDP-16.4%
  10. Carlos Beltran-HOU-16.4%

Hunter Pence had the lowest line drive rate by a WIDE margin, a full 2% below Javy Baez for the next lowest rate. Yet again, we find Solarte on a list that he REALLY doesn’t want to be on. It was well documented throughout the season that Manny Machado struggled and we may now have the reason why: he’s not hitting line drives, third worst rate in the majors.

And now the moment this article has been building up to: the Luckiest and Unluckiest hitters in baseball for the 2017 season. I don’t have a clear-cut singular number to round all of these stats into, but I tried to find the guys who found themselves ranking highly the most frequently in these specific categories.

Luckiest Hitter: 

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Eric Hosmer was the luckiest hitter in 2017 (photo credit: MLB.com)

Eric Hosmer-1B-Kansas City Royals

This may have come as a bit of a surprise to some of you because Hosmer didn’t appear in any of the Top 10’s for the chosen stats. However he wasn’t far off from making all of them. Hosmer slashed .318/.385/.498 with 25 home runs and 94 RBI, all really impressive numbers for a guy set to become a free agent. However, those numbers were inflated by a .351 BABIP, 14th best in the Majors out of 144 qualifiers. He also was 15th in soft-hit balls at 21.8% and was 116th in hard hit balls at 29.5%. He was 49th in pop-up rate at 7.2%, which isn’t too bad, it’s right around average, and his line drive rate was 22.2%, which ranked 36th. So for any team that is ready to hand Hosmer a $100M contract this offseason, I say buyer beware, he’s due for regression.

Unluckiest Hitter:

Super angry Miguel Cabrera Detroit Tigers 2017_1492802100716_9568344_ver1.0_1280_720

Future Hall of Famer Miguel Cabrera had terrible luck in 2017 (photo credit: ClickOnDetroit)

Miguel Cabrera-1B-Detroit Tigers

I knew there had to be some explanation as to why Miggy was having such a shitty season. Cabrera’s slash line was .249/.329/.399 with 16 home runs and 60 RBI. It seemed to be the symptoms of getting older (despite remaining one of the most baby-faced players in the game) but it turns out, the baseball gods hadn’t been doing Cabrera any favors. His BABIP was .292, which was 97th in the Majors out of 144 qualifying players, his line drive percentage was third best at 27.3% and his pop up percentage was 6th best at 2.5%. Only Justin Turner hit the ball softly less frequently (9.8%) than Cabrera did (9.9%). Cabrera also hit the ball 7th hardest this season at a 42.5% rate. While the lower home run totals may be concerning, I expect Cabrera to have a bounce back year in 2018. He’s a much better hitter than what his base stats showed this year and these advanced stats proved it to me that his 2017 season was probably just an aberration.

Thank you for bearing with me being a gigantic super nerd with all these stats. I had a lot of fun doing this and it answered a lot of questions for me. I’ve always had a soft spot towards guys with shit luck simply because that was me in high school. I used to hit the ball right at guys so often that I eventually gave up and stopped swinging the bat in the hopes of getting walked. It worked for a little while (I had a two-game stretch where I got walked 7 times in 8 plate appearances. The one appearance that I didn’t walk was when I swung at the first pitch. I hit a hard ground ball right at the shortstop.). Do you want to see more blogs like these? Did you absolutely despise it because you hate nerds? Let me know in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.