NBA Trade Deadline Recap

I should probably rephrase that title. It should read more on the lines of “Cavaliers completely overhaul their roster.” But let’s take a look at what specifically happened during the Trade Deadline because there were some juicy moves.

Cavaliers trade Isaiah Thomas and Channing Frye to the Lakers for Jordan Clarkson and Larry Nance.

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What a rough go of it IT had in Cleveland. Injured for the first half of the season, then when he came back everybody hated him after he started butting heads with some of his teammates and the media. It’s hard to watch, being a Celtics fan because IT meant so much to the Celtics’ rebuild despite the fact he was only in green for about 3 and a half years. He went from one of the most beloved athletes in Boston to one of the most hated in Cleveland. But I think this trade is good for both sides. It became a pretty toxic situation in Cleveland so now one of the problems is out of the way and Thomas can get a fresh start with a Lakers team that could genuinely use him. Plus, IT was at his best when the Celtics were his show. Now he’s in a place in LA where he can be “the guy” while Lonzo Ball develops. I definitely think things will go better for him in LA than it did in Cleveland. Plus, IT is a free agent at the end of the season, which could open up a ton of cap space for the Lakers to make a run at another Cavaliers player… In return, the Cavs get some high-quality role players in Clarkson and Nance, who I think can really provide a huge spark off the bench, depending on who the Cavs decide to go with at point.

Cavaliers trade Dwyane Wade to the Heat for a Protected Second Round Pick

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This was pretty surprising to me since Wade and LeBron are as close as they are. But Wade goes to a place that probably never should have let him go in Miami. Sure his skills have deteriorated, but he is and always will be the face of Miami basketball after what he did with the Heat. It’s good to see him return. That’s all I really have to say on the matter, it’s more of a feel-good thing for me than a legitimate impact trade at this stage in Wade’s career.

Three-Way Trade Between the Cavaliers, Kings, and Jazz. Cavaliers Receive Rodney Hood and George Hill, Kings Receive Joe Johnson and Iman Shumpert, Jazz Receive Derrick Rose and Jae Crowder

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A lot to unpack with this one. Let’s start with what the Cavs are getting. Rodney Hood has gotten better and better with each season he’s been in the league and I think he’s going to replace Wade as the starting 2 guard. Hill could wind up getting the majority of minutes running point when LeBron doesn’t have the ball and I think he could wind up being a valuable asset, as he’s much more of a traditional point guard than IT is. He won’t be taking shots away from LeBron like IT has been, rather he may create even more shots. The Kings getting Joe Johnson kind of falls under the Dwyane Wade thing, Johnson is past his real usefulness and I don’t really understand the deal, except as I typed that sentence it was announced the Kings would be buying out Johnson’s deal, making him a free agent. Early reports are that the Celtics, Warriors, and Rockets are all interested. Shumpert will likely be a major part of their rotation as he immediately becomes arguably their best player, considering the overall lack of talent on the Kings’ roster. The Jazz receiving Derrick Rose and Jae Crowder is interesting to me. The Jazz are in the thick of a playoff race, currently sitting at 2.5 games out of the 8 seed in the West. This appears to me to be them more tanking a little bit and rebuilding around Donovan Mitchell than anything, as even if the Jazz make the playoffs, you can guarantee they won’t get far. They’d probably end up with the 8 seed and face the Warriors in the first round, which guarantees they won’t win a playoff game, let alone reach the second round. So it’s better to tank so you can get a higher draft pick than get a mid-first rounder and not have any chance of going anywhere in the foreseeable future.

Three Team Trade. Knicks Receive Emmanuel Mudiay, Nuggets Receive Devin Harris and a 2nd Round Pick, Mavericks Receive Doug McDermott

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This is a lower-profile trade but I still believe in Mudiay’s potential when put in the right circumstances that I feel like this could be a steal for the Knicks. I think once Kristaps Porzingis returns from his unfortunate ACL injury, he could elevate Mudiay’s play and vice versa. Harris and McDermott are more of depth for the Nuggets and Mavericks. The Mavericks are playing for the #1 pick at this point in the season while the Nuggets are surprisingly the 6 seed in the West. But I don’t think Harris is an upgrade over Mudiay so the move doesn’t really make sense for me unless the Nuggets are trying to lose their way out of a playoff position to try and land a top prospect in this year’s NBA Draft, which right now looks pretty stacked with talent.

Magic Trade Elfrid Payton to the Suns for a 2nd Round Pick

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This trade makes no sense to me from the Magic’s perspective. Payton is, in my opinion, an underrated point guard who I think could really excel if he’s got teammates to work with. He’s certainly worth more than a 2nd rounder. I actually think that Payton is an upgrade over Tyler Ulis and once Devin Booker is fully healthy again, I think he and Payton could form a formidable duo.

Trail Blazers Trade Noah Vonleh to the Bulls for the Draft Rights to Milovan Rakovic

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This trade is mainly just something that gets the Trail Blazers under the luxury tax as Vonleh is no more than a decent bench player. I’m mostly including this because not only did Vonleh play at Indiana, but he actually played against my high school a few times. I got to see him play twice as a high schooler. First time he absolutely whipped us, the second time we put on a full court press and totally frustrated him into a bunch of turnovers.

That’s going to do it for my trade deadline recap. The Cavaliers look totally different and this may be what they need to get themselves back on track. Also, in football news, congratulations to Jimmy Garoppolo on his 5-year $137M deal with the 49ers, the largest annual contract in NFL history. That’s what 5 starts can do for you. As a Patriots fan, watching Garoppolo succeed is like watching my son succeed. Let me know what you think of the NBA Trade Deadline in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10. Your move, MLB.

World Series Game 6 Recap

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photo credit: Youtube User Baseball Breakdowns

The Los Angeles Dodgers defeated the Houston Astros 3-1 in Game 6 of the 2017 World Series to even the Series at 3 games apiece to force a winner-take-all Game 7 set for Wednesday night. Tony Watson was the winning pitcher, Justin Verlander got the loss, and Kenley Jansen was credited with the save. Some takeaways:

-Kenley Jansen looked like Kenley Jansen for the first time in this World Series. Dave Roberts brought him in to get the 6-out save, which did not go well in Game 2, however he was dominant this time out. Astros hitters looked completely lost up there as he retired all 6 batters he faced, including strikeouts of Josh Reddick and Carlos Beltran to end it

-With Francisco Liriano’s appearance in the 8th inning, only Houston third-string catcher Juan Centeno has yet to appear in a game in this World Series. I don’t have any stat on if there has ever been a World Series where everybody played because Baseball Reference won’t return my Tweets. Sad.

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When everyone gets to play in the World Series except you (photo credit: Houston Chronicle)

-Cody Bellinger became a part of baseball immortality in this game for all the wrong reasons. He went 0-4 with 4 K’s for the second time in this World Series, which has never happened before, and has struck out 14 times in this series, which is a record.

-Again, I had a problem with Dave Roberts’ handling of Rich Hill. This video right here was the entire offense for the Astros:

Hill got pulled with 2 outs in the 5th inning. To start that inning, he let up a single to Brian McCann, which was a great play by Yasiel Puig in right to hold him to a single because that ball easily could have gone for extra bases. Then Marwin Gonzalez hit a double under the dive of Justin Turner at 3rd base to put runners on 2nd and 3rd with nobody out (McCann would have scored had Puig not held him to just a single). Hill then strikes out Josh Reddick after falling behind 3-0 then strikes out Justin Verlander. Dave Roberts leaves him in long enough to intentionally walk George Springer then pulls him for Brandon Morrow. The crowd met this decision with a chorus of boos, then a standing ovation for Hill, who was seen slapping at some cups in the dugout. Last time Roberts pulled him early in Game 2, he slammed his glove. I really feel for Rich Hill because he has pitched his heart out this World Series without the confidence of his manager.

-Speaking of Brandon Morrow, he has pitched in all 6 games of this World Series. The only man to pitch all 7 games was Darold Knowles in the 1973 World Series for the Oakland A’s. One thing to note, his team won. Morrow was significantly better in Game 6 than Game 5, where I broke down his outing pitch-by-pitch. In Game 5, Morrow’s fastball was about 95 mph. It’s supposed to be about 98, which it was in Game 6. Rest helps.

-Play of the game has to be this double from Chris Taylor:

He fights off the pitch for a double off Verlander, who had been DOMINANT up until that point. This was the moment where the Dodgers revived their hopes for this series, as next at bat was this Corey Seager sac fly that probably would’ve left the yard if this was Games 1-5

I can only imagine how loud the crowd would’ve been had it gone a couple more feet. It was wet and damp for the middle innings of this game and that likely was the main reason this was only a 1-run play and not 3. But it was plenty considering how well the Dodgers pitched.

-Joc Pederson is probably the most fun dude to watch round bases

He’s got 3 home runs this postseason and continues to make me look like an idiot for thinking Curtis Granderson should’ve gotten the roster spot over him. For as much shit as I have given Dave Roberts in these blogs, he has shown time and again that he knows more about baseball than me.

-Justin Verlander just couldn’t catch a break this series. In Game 2, he pitched 4.2 no-hit innings before serving up a home run to Pederson, then a 2-run homer to Seager in the 6th. In this one, he serves up an excuse-me double and a sac fly for the only runs he allowed and he gets hit with the loss. He had allowed only 1 hit through the first 5 innings and that was on a blooper by Yasiel Puig that Springer MIGHT have been able to catch had he dove, though he may have been having second thoughts after what happened in Game 5, the last time he dove (he missed and Bellinger ended up with a triple).

-The home plate umpire was Dan Iassogna tonight. Bill Miller was relegated to right field duties. I’m not sure if Iassogna’s strike zone was good or not, but if I’m not thinking about your calls more than the actual game, that’s a good sign.

Looking Ahead:

The two best words in sports: Game Seven. The pitching matchup is going to be Lance McCullers vs Yu Darvish, a rematch of Game 3. McCullers was seen playing catch after Game 6 was done. Interesting call by him, that might be something worth talking about during his start in Game 7. But he pitched decently last time out in Game 3, better than his stat line might have suggested, while Darvish is coming off a disastrous performance. He’ll get a chance to redeem himself and face Yuli Gurriel for the first time since the little incident with Gurriel making squinty eyes after homering off Darvish. Though based on the way Darvish responded to the incident (about as professionally as humanly possible), I doubt that’s going to be too heavy on his mind. All hands will be on deck for this one because it will be do or die for this winner-take-all Game 7. Both starting pitchers will be pulled at the first sign of trouble and everyone except Hill and Verlander will be available for this game (Hell, Clayton Kershaw tried to convince Roberts to let him go in this game. He was the starting pitcher in Game 5).

Prediction:

Yeah, I’m not going to try and predict how this one’s going to go. The way these two teams have played, anything is possible. This has been an all-timer of a World Series and it’s only fitting that it goes 7 games. But I guess if you really want a prediction, I’ll flip a coin again. Heads Dodgers win first title since 1988, Tails Astros win first title in franchise history. *Flips coin*. Congrats Dodgers.

World Series Game 2 Recap

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photo credit: Youtube user Baseball Breakdown

Before I get into this game, I have to mention Vin Scully’s ceremonial first pitch. That was probably the best ceremonial first pitch I’ve ever seen, and I’ve seen Mark Wahlberg airmail one to the backstop in person. Scully’s still got the flair for showmanship, too. Any more words just wouldn’t do it justice, so here it is below.

Now that that’s gotten its due:

-The Astros won their first World Series game in franchise history 7-6 in 11 innings, Chris Devenski got the win and Brandon McCarthy was saddled with the loss. Devenski technically also recorded the save but baseball doesn’t award saves to the winning pitcher for some reason.

-I don’t even know where to begin with this game. I really can’t. It should’ve been over on at least four different occasions. Here are a couple of facts surrounding what happened:

-8 home runs were hit by 8 different players (a World Series record), 6 of which occurred in the 9th inning or later

-5 extra innings home runs were hit, which is a record for an entire SERIES, let alone one World Series game

-The Dodgers used every single member of their bullpen

-The Dodgers bullpen had a postseason ERA of 0.83 entering this game. They allowed 6 runs in their 7 innings of work in Game 2, all of which came in their final 4

-Before I go much further, I have to get something off my chest. Big rant coming: Dave Roberts completely overmanaged this game. I’ve been singing his praises all year, rightfully so, but a large part of the way this game ended was on him. The first mistake was pulling Rich Hill after only 4 innings and 60 pitches. I get that you want to use your all-world bullpen. But Hill was looking pretty sharp in his 4 innings of work. Yeah he allowed a run on this play right here:

But otherwise he had been really sharp. In his 4 innings, he only gave up 3 hits with 3 walks (1 was intentional) and 7 strikeouts. The fact that he only had 60 pitches after 2 real walks and 7 strikeouts means that the Astros hitters were aggressive with him and weren’t having a ton of success, which was true. Hill was visibly pissed, and rightfully so, slamming his glove on the bench after he was told his night was done. Then came his usage of Tony Watson in the sixth inning. In the sixth, Kenta Maeda allowed a hit to Carlos Correa, then retired Yuli Gurriel. Roberts brings in the left-handed Watson to face the left-handed Brian McCann. Now for one, McCann hadn’t been swinging the bat really well all postseason, regardless of what handedness the pitcher was. You totally could’ve left in Maeda against McCann and probably gotten a similar result to what Watson got. That’s one beef I’ve had with managers is that they tend to play the lefty/righty matchups a little too fiercely, especially when it probably wouldn’t matter given the way a certain hitter has been hitting. But Roberts brings in Watson to face McCann and Watson gets a one-pitch double play. Awesome, Watson will be totally rested for the 7th inning. But instead, out trotting from the bullpen for the top of the 7th is Ross Stripling, who surrenders a four-pitch walk to Marwin Gonzalez and then HE gets pulled. That’s already four relievers that Roberts has gone through and you haven’t even gotten an out in the 7th inning yet. You’d think the Astros had put up 10 runs by that point, but they only had the 1 on the board. Morrow dominated the 7th inning, then let up a double to Alex Bregman that was nearly caught on what would have been an amazing play by Yasiel Puig. Roberts then baffles me by bringing in Kenley Jansen for a six-out save in a 2-run game. Look, Dave, I get it, Jansen is the best closer in the game. But he didn’t look that great in Game 1 the night prior and now you want him to get six outs with an inherited runner? The run does score and makes the game 3-2 but Jansen is able to get out of the 8th inning with the lead intact. Heading to the ninth and this happens:

And there goes Jansen’s record streak of consecutive converted saves to begin a postseason career (12). Jansen was able to recover and got the next three outs. But then the 10th inning happened. No issues here with Roberts’ decision to go with Fields, it’s not his fault that Fields decided to hang a couple of pitches to the Astros’ two best hitters:

Gurriel then hit a double to follow up the back-to-back home runs and Roberts had seen enough and pulled Fields for Tony Cingrani. Right call. Cingrani got the next three outs. It’s now the bottom of the 10th and the Astros hold a 5-3 lead. Closer Ken Giles, who had come in the 9th and sent the game into the 10th, was back out there to face Yasiel Puig. Puig proceeds to do this:

Love how Puig gently placed his bat on the ground after that. Giles gets the next two outs, then walks Logan Forsythe. He bounces a pitch and Forsythe takes second base with Kike Hernandez at the dish. Then Hernandez gets the first Dodgers hit that didn’t leave the yard.

Puig’s reaction was pretty great too.

That sent the game to the top of the 11th. Roberts brings in Brandon McCarthy to replace Tony Cingrani. I understand Roberts’ thinking here, McCarthy is normally a starter and you may need him to eat up innings. But McCarthy is your last remaining reliever! Cingrani only threw 5 pitches and has starter experience! McCarthy promptly gives up a single to Cameron Maybin, Maybin steals second to earn everyone a free Taco, then George Springer came up:

7-5 Astros. McCarthy gets the next 3 batters. Astros leave in Chris Devenski, who finished off the bottom of the 10th. He gets the first two batters, then Charlie Culberson gets in on the fun.

Based on the way Culberson was rounding the bases, it’s possible that he thought he had tied the game. I’m going to give him the benefit of the doubt and say he was trying to hype up his team similar to the way Joc Pederson rounded the bases on his home run way back in the 5th.

Devenski responded by striking out Yasiel Puig on a long and suspenseful at bat to finally end this instant classic. I have to say, Dave Roberts needs to do better with managing his bullpen if the Dodgers are to advance. Or perhaps he handled it as well as anybody and he just had the worst luck. That’s equally likely. But a lot of the blame has to fall on his shoulders. Rant over.

Some other notes from this game.

-Some de ja vu in Game 2. Game 1 saw Keuchel serve up a 2-run homer to the number 2 hitter in the order after a 2-out walk from Chris Taylor to make the score 3-1 Dodgers in the bottom of the 6th inning. The exact same thing happened in Game 2 to Justin Verlander.

Baseball is weird.

-Verlander had been no-hitting the Dodgers up until Pederson’s home run that narrowly missed Josh Reddick’s glove. He was really good all night, going 6 innings allowing only 2 hits and striking out 5. Unfortunately for him, both hits he let up left the yard.

-I didn’t like the move to have Joc Pederson on the World Series roster instead of Curtis Granderson. Granderson’s experience and Pederson’s reckless swing made Grandy the obvious choice in my brain, but it worked in Roberts’ favor in Game 2, as Pederson’s home run gave the Dodgers the spark they needed against Verlander.

-What would’ve happened had Yasiel Puig been able to make that diving catch to rob Alex Bregman of a double, which started the scoring for the Astros? We can only wonder. Can’t blame Puig for not catching it, though. It was amazing he even had a chance to make a play at it.

Looking Ahead:

We have a full day off to digest this game before Game 3 on Friday in Houston. The Dodgers will send Yu Darvish to the hill to face Lance McCullers. The Dodgers will need to rethink their strategy, as Houston has yet to lose a game at home this postseason (which had been the case for LA prior to this game). Lucky for them, they have a full day off to rest their bullpen, but Darvish NEEDS to go deep into this game to preserve the ‘pen.

Prediction for Game 3:

After what we just witnessed, I haven’t the slightest idea as to what’s going to happen in Game 3. Literally anything could happen. I’m just going to toss a coin. Heads the Dodgers bounce back, Tails the Astros keep up momentum. *Flips coin* It’s Tails.

 

MLB Awards Season

Yesterday was my playoff preview, which you can read here. Today, we discuss who I think should win the major awards in baseball, as well as a few that aren’t technically real awards. Some are obvious (AL Rookie of the Year), some are not (NL MVP). Without further ado, let’s begin.

AL MVP: Jose Altuve, 2B, Houston Astros

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Jose Altuve has been a front-runner for AL MVP the last 3 years. (photo credit: Grantland)

This was a tough one, as Yankees right fielder and rookie sensation Aaron Judge has been unbelievable this season (more on him later). But Jose Altuve has been the catalyst for arguably the best team in baseball and has been doing so at a steady pace throughout the season. He hit .346 this year with 24 home runs, 81 RBI, and 32 stolen bases to go along with 112 runs scored. In addition to his offensive prowess, he has also been an excellent defender at a premium position and is a menace on the basepaths. You could also argue that nobody is more important to his team. Altuve is what makes the Astros go and he has been doing this for quite some time now. It’s time he gets the recognition he deserves.

Others receiving consideration: Aaron Judge, RF, New York Yankes; Corey Kluber, P, Cleveland Indians; Jose Ramirez, UTIL, Cleveland Indians

NL MVP: Charlie Blackmon, CF, Colorado Rockies

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Charlie Blackmon put on perhaps his finest performance in 2017 (photo credit: The Denver Post)

This was one of the toughest decisions I had to make. You would need three or four hands to count how many guys could feasibly win MVP in the NL this season. There’s Giancarlo Stanton of the Miami Marlins, whose 59 home runs captivated the nation. There’s Nolan Arenado of the Rockies, whose defensive wizardry and capacity for driving in runs was a sight to behold. Joey Votto did things human beings shouldn’t be allowed to do.

But Charlie Blackmon, Arenado’s teammate, has to be my pick here. He hit .331 with 37 home runs, 104 RBI, 137 runs scored and slugged .601. All out of the leadoff spot in the lineup. He made the Rockies prolific offense go and Arenado doesn’t lead the Majors in RBI for most of the season without Blackmon at the top of this lineup. Blackmon even drove in 100 runs himself out of the leadoff spot, something unheard of throughout the history of the game. Blackmon’s 104 RBI is actually a Major League record for a guy who primarily batted leadoff. Blackmon does it all for this Rockies team that finds itself in a playoff spot for the first time since 2009.

Others receiving consideration: Giancarlo Stanton, RF, Miami Marlins; Nolan Arenado, 3B, Colorado Rockies; Joey Votto, 1B, Cincinnati Reds; Paul Goldschmidt, 1B, Arizona Diamondbacks; Anthony Rendon, 3B, Washington Nationals

AL Cy Young: Corey Kluber, Cleveland Indians

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Corey Kluber has been absolutely dominant down the stretch (photo credit: Chicago Tribune)

Yes, I wrote a blog saying that Chris Sale should win the award. But that was before delving into their September stats. In September, Sale’s ERA was 3.72, with 3 games giving up at least 3 runs and 2 games where he gave up 0. His inconsistency this month forced me to drop him from the race. Kluber, on the other hand, has only gotten hotter. His September ERA was 0.84, allowing all of 4 earned runs through the entire month. Sale allowed 4 runs on 2 separate occasions in September. It’s tough to pick against a guy who struck out 308 batters, but his inconsistency when the other guy was as dominant as ever is hard to overlook.

Others receiving consideration: Chris Sale, Boston Red Sox

NL Cy Young: Max Scherzer, Washington Nationals

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Max Scherzer seems destined to win his second straight Cy Young Award, third overall (photo credit: Sports Illustrated)

Scherzer missed a little bit of time late in the season due to injury but that didn’t stop him from reaching 200 innings for the fifth consecutive season. He’s the ace of a dominating Nationals pitching rotation, striking out 12 batters per 9 innings while holding an ERA of 2.51. Clayton Kershaw was as nasty as he always is but he missed far too much time for me to seriously consider him unseating Scherzer, who I have winning this award for the second consecutive season.

Others receiving consideration: Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers; Stephen Strasburg, Washington Nationals

AL Rookie of the Year: Aaron Judge, RF, New York Yankees

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One of 52 bombs hit by Aaron Judge this season (photo credit: MLB.com)

Was there any other option? The argument could be made that Judge should be MVP as well, which would be the third time ever a rookie of the year also won MVP (Fred Lynn and Ichiro were the other two). Judge hit .284 with 52 home runs and 114 RBI, leading the majors in Fangraphs WAR at 8.2. His 52 dingers were the most ever by a rookie, breaking the previous mark of 49 set by Mark McGwire back in 1987.

Others receiving consideraton: Andrew Benintendi, LF, Boston Red Sox; Mitch Haniger, RF, Seattle Mariners

NL Rookie of the Year: Cody Bellinger, 1B, Los Angeles Dodgers

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Cody Bellinger has been a driving force behind the Dodgers 104-win season (photo credit: True Blue LA)

Like Judge, this was also an easy pick. When Adrian Gonzalez went down for the Dodgers, it fell on Bellinger to pick up the slack. He did that and then some. Bellinger hit 39 home runs and drove in 97 runs for the Dodgers this year, keeping up the franchise’s long history of rookie success. Rhys Hoskins of the Phillies was also a consideration, as the start he got off to was one of the craziest things I’ve ever seen. He ended up hitting 18 home runs in just 50 games this year, which would put him on pace for over 55 for an entire regular season. However, Hoskins didn’t play enough to seriously be considered a threat to Bellinger.

Others receiving consideration: Rhys Hoskins, 1B, Philadelphia Phillies; Paul DeJong, SS, St. Louis Cardinals

Reliever of the Year: Kenley Jansen, Los Angeles Dodgers

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Kenley Jansen has been about as deadly as any reliever in baseball (photo credit: InsideSoCal.com)

Another nail-biter, Jansen barely beats out Red Sox closer Craig Kimbrel. While Jansen’s K rate is lower (14.36 against Kimbrel’s 16. 43), his walk rate is half of Kimbrel’s and his home run rate is lower as well. There is a slight ERA difference in Jansen’s favor (1.32 vs 1.43). I wouldn’t argue against Kimbrel winning this award by any means, but I give Jansen the slight edge here.

Others receiving consideration: Craig Kimbrel, Boston Red Sox

Platinum Glove (best defender): Andrelton Simmons, SS, Anaheim Angels

Simmons is well-known for his defensive wizardry (he had a heck of a season at the plate as well, but we’re not going to talk about that when discussing a defensive award) and he kept up his reputation by leading the Majors in Defensive Runs Saved with 32. Mookie Betts of the Red Sox was next at 31 but after those two there was a steep drop-off. In fact, the next closest shortstop to Simmons was Trevor Story with 11. To clear things up, Defensive Runs Saved (DRS) measures how many runs you prevent with your defense throughout the season. A DRS of 0 is considered average. Simmons repeatedly turns insane highlight plays on a daily basis and every year this award will be his to lose.

Others receiving consideration: Mookie Betts, RF, Boston Red Sox; Byron Buxton, CF, Minnesota Twins

AL Gold Gloves:

P-Marcus Stroman, Toronto Blue Jays

C-Martin Maldonado-Anaheim Angels

1B-Mitch Moreland, Boston Red Sox

2B-Ian Kinsler, Detroit Tigers

3B-Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay Rays

SS-Andrelton Simmons, Anaheim Angels

LF-Brett Gardner, New York Yankees

CF-Byron Buxton, Minnesota Twins

RF-Mookie Betts, Boston Red Sox

NL Gold Gloves:

P-R. A. Dickey, Atlanta Braves

C-Tucker Barnhart, Cincinnati Reds

1B-Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds

2B-DJ LeMahieu, Colorado Rockies

3B-Nolan Arenado, Colorado Rockies

SS-Trevor Story, Colorado Rockies

LF-Marcell Ozuna, Miami Marlins

CF-Billy Hamilton, Cincinnati Reds

RF-Yasiel Puig, Los Angeles Dodgers

AL Silver Sluggers

C-Gary Sanchez, New York Yankees

1B-Eric Hosmer, Kansas City Royals

2B-Jose Altuve, Houston Astros

3B-Jose Ramirez, Cleveland Indians

SS-Francisco Lindor, Cleveland Indians

LF-Justin Upton, Detroit Tigers/Anaheim Angels

CF-Mike Trout, Anaheim Angels

RF-Aaron Judge, New York Yankees

DH-Nelson Cruz, Seattle Mariners

NL Silver Sluggers

C-Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants

1B-Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds

2B-Daniel Murphy, Washington Nationals

3B-Nolan Arenado, Colorado Rockies

SS-Zack Cozart, Cincinnati Reds

LF-Tommy Pham, St. Louis Cardinals

CF-Charlie Blackmon, Colorado Rockies

RF-Giancarlo Stanton, Miami Marlins

P-Tyler Glasnow, Pittsburgh Pirates

Comeback Player of the Year: Giancarlo Stanton, Miami Marlins

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Giancarlo Stanton’s 59 home runs put the world on notice (photo credit: CBS Sports)

This is the start of the MLB awards that aren’t technically real. I’ll be giving this award to a guy who had a poor season the year prior but bounced back with a great one. This year, it’s Giancarlo Stanton. Last season, when I was at the Home Run Derby in San Diego, Stanton put on a damn clinic, hitting 61 home runs (the previous derby record had been 41). He wasn’t in the All Star Game that season, having been hitting in the low .200s at the break. Pedro Gomez asked Stanton after he had won why he did the Derby when he wasn’t in the All Star Game (a weird question to ask, if not a little mean if you ask me), Stanton looked a tad offended but shrugged it off, raised the trophy, and said “I came here for this bad boy.” This season, Stanton has turned the entire Major Leagues into his own personal home run derby, belting 59 home runs, the most since Barry Bonds’ record-setting 73 in 2001. Stanton wasn’t just all about the long balls, though. He also managed to hit .281 and walked 12.3% of the time.

Others receiving consideration: Bryce Harper, RF, Washington Nationals; Andrew McCutchen, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates; Zack Greinke, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

Breakout Star of the Year: Aaron Judge, RF, New York Yankees

Last season, when he played only 27 games after a late-season callup, Judge did not look great. There was a hole in his swing the size of a hipster’s ear lobe as he struck out at a 44.2% rate. This season, while his strikeout rate is still high (30.7%), Judge has been sending the pitches he does end up hitting into other area codes. The thing that impressed me most about Judge wasn’t how many home runs he was hitting, but where they were going. And I don’t just mean distance. Judge was hitting just as many home runs to left field as he was to center field and right. You couldn’t focus on one spot to try and get him out like you can with most other power hitters because Judge can take the outside pitches just as far as the inside ones. Below is Aaron Judge’s spray chart this season, courtesy of Fangraphs.chart

Others receiving consideration: Rhys Hoskins, 1B, Philadelphia Phillies; Tommy Pham, LF, St. Louis Cardinals; Jimmy Nelson, SP, Milwaukee Brewers; Robbie Ray, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks; Cody Bellinger, 1B, Los Angeles Dodgers; Chris Taylor, UTIL, Los Angeles Dodgers; Tim Beckham, SS, Tampa Bay Rays/Baltimore Orioles

Defensive Play of the Year: Austin Jackson, OF, Cleveland Indians

Hitting Performance of the Year: Anthony Rendon, 3B, Washington Nationals

Rendon’s line on April 30th against the New York Mets: 6-6 with 3 home runs, 10 RBI, and a double.

Also receiving consideration: Scooter Gennett on June 6th against the St. Louis Cardinals. 5-5 with 4 home runs and 10 RBI

Pitching Performance of the Year: Rich Hill, Los Angeles Dodgers

Poor guy. Rich Hill pulls a Harvey Haddix and goes 9 no-hit (nearly 9 perfect but for a Logan Forsythe error) innings but his team doesn’t get him a single run, then he gives up a walk-off home run to Josh Harrison in the 10th. First time ever that a no hitter is broken up by a walk-off home run in extra innings. Oddly enough, this game came the day after Sports Illustrated published a cover that asked if the Dodgers were the greatest team of all time. Rich Hill’s line on August 23rd against the Pittsburgh Pirates: 9+ innings, 1 hits, 0 walks, 1 run, 10 strikeouts, 99 pitches needed.

Others receiving consideration: Edinson Volquez’s no hitter on June 3rd against the Arizona Diamondbacks

Most enjoyable player to watch: Javy Baez, 2B/SS, Chicago Cubs


There’s more, but I think these two videos get the job done.

Others receiving consideration: Francisco Lindor, SS, Cleveland Indians; Andrelton Simmons, SS, Anaheim Angels

Those are my awards picks. Agree? Disagree? Let me know in the comments section or hit me up on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.