The Most Unbreakable Records in Sports

So I read an article on MLB.com, which you can read here, about 17 of the most unbreakable records in baseball, which believe me, there’s a lot more than 17. This was written in response to yesterday being the 80th anniversary of Johnny Vander Meer’s second consecutive no hitter. But I thought I’d take it a step further and talk about all of sports. I won’t touch on any of the ones they mentioned in the article because the fact I’m stealing their idea for an article doesn’t mean I should steal their content too (even though this article has definitely been written before, but whatever, I’m trying to be a good person). I’m going to do MLB, NFL, and NBA because again, those are the only sports I know anything about.

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MLB-Cy Young’s 511 Career Wins

How this one wasn’t on the MLB.com article is beyond me because this is probably the most untouchable record in sports. People are pretty much in agreement that nobody will ever win 300 games again. Cy Young won 511. Now the Wins stat for pitchers has certainly taken a deep dive in importance, especially considering all the factors that go into achieving one. I mean, Hell, look at Jacob deGrom right now. He has a 1.55 ERA and has won just 4 games this year. But regardless, the Wins stat was the most regarded stat for a long time in baseball before bullpens and pitch counts became so important and is a big reason why the award for pitching excellence bears Young’s name. Here are a few interesting tidbits about how Young reached 511 wins:

-He won at least 30 games in a season 4 times (the average starter that spends the entire season in the Majors and off the DL typically starts about 32-33 games)

-He factored into 50 decisions in 1893 and factored in at least 30 decisions in all but 3 seasons: his rookie year and final 2 seasons

-He pitched over 400 innings in a season 5 times

-Aside from his rookie year, he didn’t throw under 200 innings in a season until he was 43

Amazingly, though, Young is not a member of the 3000 strikeout club despite how many innings he threw. In fact, he only struck out 200 batters in a season twice in his 22-year career. His K/9 was 1.5(!!!). People wonder what’s wrong with Cardinals rookie reliever Jordan Hicks for his K/9 being in the 5’s when he can touch 105 mph on his sinker. The worst in the Majors last season was Giants starter Ty Blach at 4.01. Now granted, the average MLB team only struck out about 2-4 times during this time period vs about 8 times today, but that would still put Young below average for his era.

MLB-Sam Crawford’s 309 Career Triples

Triples were so much easier to hit when Crawford was raising Hell as a Detroit Tiger and Cincinnati Red from 1899-1917. The ballparks were much bigger and home runs were considered to be bad strategy. Crawford averaged roughly 20 triples per season over his 18 MLB seasons. The last time anyone hit 20 triples in a season was Curtis Granderson and Jimmy Rollins in 2007 (both guys actually hit 20 doubles, 20 triples, and 20 home runs in that season). That was a typical season for Crawford. Among the career triples leaderboard, the highest-ranked active player is Jose Reyes with 128 career triples and he’s tied for 84th all time and 181 behind Crawford. Nobody is touching 309.

NFL-Jerry Rice’s 22,895 career receiving yards and 197 receiving touchdowns

Despite the rise of the passing game in the NFL, these numbers aren’t getting eclipsed. Back when Rice played, the passing game was always on the backburner to the ground game and teams weren’t as concerned with stopping it as they are today. If a receiver was putting up Rice’s numbers today, they’d be getting double-teamed like crazy and would open up more opportunities for other receivers. Rice played 20 seasons in the NFL, which doesn’t happen very often for kickers anymore, let alone receivers. The next closest receiver in career receiving yards is Terrell Owens at 15,934 yards (though Larry Fitzgerald is RIGHT behind him at 15,545) and the next closest in receiving touchdowns is Randy Moss with 156. The fact that we’re in this era of receiving and still nobody is close just proves that nobody is touching Rice.

NFL-Paul Krause’s 81 career interceptions (also, Dick “Night Train” Lane’s 14 interceptions in a season in 1952)

There were a few guys who were approaching this lately, like Rod Woodson finished with 71 picks and Ed Reed reached 64, but nobody is ever going to eclipse Krause’s 81 career interceptions and nobody is ever going to even sniff Lane’s 14 for a season. My main reason behind this is simple: when a guy is starting to rack up a lot of picks, quarterbacks start to avoid them. There hasn’t been a guy with 10 interceptions in a season since Antonio Cromartie in 2007 so despite the rise in passing numbers, I don’t foresee anybody sniffing Krause or Lane’s numbers just because NFL teams wizen up to known ballhawks now.

NBA-Pretty much any record Wilt Chamberlain still has

100 points in a game, 23,924 career rebounds, 50.1 points per game in a season, those are the three big ones that aren’t getting sniffed. Chamberlain accomplished a lot of these while there was no 3-second rule so he could just hang out in the paint all game. He was also just much bigger than everybody else and could just bully opposing players into getting his shot or grabbing the board. Nowadays, you risk a loss of possession and potential free throws for the other team. Kobe Bryant dropped 81 points in 2006 and he was still almost 20 points behind Wilt, which would be a solid game for most players. Dwight Howard is the active leader in career rebounds and he’s still about 8,000 behind Wilt, and nobody has gotten more than 40 PPG for a season this millennium. Wilt’s numbers are safe.

Sports-Bill Russell’s 11 Championships as a Player

And he did it in 13 career seasons. The next closest is Yogi Berra’s 10 with the Yankees and we’re not seeing any dynasties like we saw in the 1950’s and 1960’s when these guys played. For one, both feats were accomplished when their leagues were about half the size that they are now. Plus free agency and salary caps are a thing now and it’s hard to maintain a team that is dominant for such a long stretch of time because pieces are constantly changing. The most titles of a player in any sport in the last 30 years is Michael Jordan’s 6. Russell almost doubled that and he played 2 fewer seasons. In a season that Bill Russell played in, there was an 85% chance he was winning the title. I bitch about the lack of parity in today’s NBA but it was NOTHING compared to the 1960’s when the Celtics won 8 titles in a row. But I probably wouldn’t have bitched about that since I’m a Celtics fan myself. Yeah I’m that type of fan, sue me.

So that’s just a look at just a few records that I don’t think have any chance of falling anytime soon, or ever, for that matter. The way the game has evolved has rendered these marks as untouchable. Let me know if there are other records you can think of that will never be eclipsed in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

 

Injury News in Baseball

So there have been several injuries this season of note and while it doesn’t really FEEL like it’s a lot of guys going down, the talent of the players who have gotten hurt in recent weeks has been what is more of the story. Here are some guys who have gone down in the last few weeks and what their timetable is for return to form.

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-Shohei Ohtani, the two-way Japanese phenom for the Angels, has a partially torn UCL, which almost always requires Tommy John surgery, which would end his 2018 season and possibly his 2019 season as well. The Angels are holding out hope that it doesn’t come to Tommy John and they are even considering continuing to use him as a DH while he recovers from the surgery. That sounds like a REALLY bad idea. While I get that Anaheim might feel a little desperate since they have a legitimately good team this year that is contending for a playoff spot in a VERY tough AL West, you have to learn from the mistake the Washington Redskins made with Robert Griffin III in 2013. RG3 was rushed back from a torn ACL in the postseason to play week 1 and all of his elusiveness was sapped away and his flaws as a passer were amplified, thus destroying his once promising career. You could be facing a similar situation with Ohtani. Ohtani has been very successful in his first couple months in the States, slashing .289/.372/.535 with 6 homers and 20 RBI in 43 games as a hitter and carries a 4-1 record with a 3.10 ERA while striking out over 11 batters per 9 innings as a pitcher, both very good performances. There hasn’t been a player who was both a high-caliber pitcher and hitter since Babe Ruth. Don’t fuck this up, Anaheim. Let him recover. You risk destroying this man’s career by rushing him back before he’s ready. UCL’s are nothing to screw around with, swinging a bat can be just as damaging as throwing a baseball and since Ohtani bats lefty, it will be his right (throwing) arm that does the bulk of the swing and therefore takes the brunt of the pressure. Just bite the bullet and try and make a move at the deadline to compensate for the loss. I hear the Mets may make Jacob deGrom available. If you rush Ohtani back before he’s ready, you could risk an RG3 situation in which a phenomenal talent gets destroyed because you weren’t patient enough to let him recover. Do the right thing, Angels.

-Tigers first baseman and 2-time AL MVP Miguel Cabrera is out for the remainder of the 2018 season after undergoing bicep surgery, which upsets me for a number of reasons, the main of which being that Miggy is one of my favorite players in baseball even as his skills start to decline with age. However this could be a blessing in disguise for Detroit. Cabrera was slashing .301/.394/.451 in 37 games played (he had another DL stint earlier this season) with 3 home runs and 22 RBI. While the power numbers aren’t what we’re used to from the future Hall of Famer, he was still a productive hitter in this lineup. The Tigers are sitting in third place in the AL Central at 31-37 as I write this and aren’t nearly bad enough to be in serious contention for another high draft spot. If you’re going to rebuild, you have to be all-in and Miggy hitting well does not help a rebuild. They landed Auburn ace Casey Mize with the top pick in this year’s MLB Draft and he was one of the few prospects I felt had superstar potential. If they hope to land a talent like that again, they really need to hit the tank button. While it does suck to lose an impactful hitter like Miguel Cabrera, it can be potentially beneficial for the future of this franchise as they stockpile high draft picks.

-While Mookie Betts did return from the DL after missing 14 games due to a hip injury, the Red Sox superstar hasn’t looked quite at 100% in his first couple games back and I think that the team could afford to give him some more rest every now and then as he attempts to return to the form that was dominating baseball for the first two months of the season. Despite the recent DL stint, Mookie has garnered the most votes in the first All Star ballot update by slashing .354/.431/.735 and hitting 17 home runs and driving in 37 RBI while continuing to play the best right field in baseball. However in his absence, the Red Sox went a decent 8-6, showing that the team can win without their superstar. They still have guys like the deadly JD Martinez and the suddenly red-hot Andrew Benintendi, so I think giving Mookie more frequent breathers to make sure he gets to 100% would be most beneficial to this team’s long-term goals.

-Yankees starter Masahiro Tanaka injured his hammy running the bases and had to hit the DL and I’m sorry, but his happens far too often when American League pitchers have to hit in National League stadiums. Yankees fans should be especially weary of this after what happened to Chien-Ming Wang a decade ago. Wang was absolutely dominant for the pinstripes but after hurting himself running the bases in Houston, he was never the same and it destroyed his career. If ever there was a reason to install the DH throughout Major League Baseball, this would be a big one. Pitchers aren’t focused at all on their hitting (unless they are Shohei Ohtani) and the AL ones only ever have to hit on the rare occasion they pitch in an NL ballpark, which is maybe two or three times a season for each starter. Even then they don’t expect to get on base so when they do they’re totally unprepared to actually run bases, which is an important part of the game if you hadn’t noticed so they can’t exactly dog it out there. This leads to leg injuries like the one suffered by Tanaka. I don’t know, man, I mean what other professional sport are you going to find that has such different rules depending on what league/conference they’re in? I get the tradition thing, really, I do. But MLB has already installed video replay systems to overturn calls, why can’t they just make the DH rule universal? I enjoy AL baseball more than NL baseball simply for the fact that I don’t have to watch these pitchers half-ass their at bats because they know they’re trash at the plate anyway and nobody expects them to get a hit.

That’s going to do it for this injury update, let me know what you think of the recent trends in injuries in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

30 Clubs in 30 Days: New York Mets

So a couple stories I want to bring to light here. First off, former LSU runningback and potential first round pick Derrius Guice was asked by an unknown NFL team during his Combine interview a couple of very inappropriate questions, which Guice claims was to provoke him and get a feel for his response. The anonymous team asked Guice if he was gay and if his mom was a hooker. I can understand the reasoning behind asking these questions, as you’re trying to gauge how this guy’s going to deal with the media, but you have to use better judgment here. Asking if someone is gay is totally inappropriate and asking someone if their mother is a hooker is downright disrespectful. They should’ve learned when the Dolphins did that to Dez Bryant in his Combine interview. I remember I was in Canton, Ohio to see the Pro Football Hall of Fame with my mom and she went for a walk outside of our hotel. When she got back, she told me that some guy had driven up to her and asked if she was “working.” I’m not a confrontational person, but I was ready to throw haymakers at this dude that I’d never met so kudos to Guice for keeping his cool. Also, the Kansas City Royals held an anti-porn seminar for the players and coaches, most likely to protect the wrists on their throwing hands when they’re away from their wives because athletes definitely stay faithful to their wives on road trips. That’s really all I have to say on that because otherwise I can’t see any reason to be against something that brings people so much joy. Also, the Rams acquired another corner in a trade, this time landing Aqib Talib from the Broncos. So basically with Marcus Peters and Aqib Talib the Rams may have the shit talking-est cornerback duo in NFL history. Anyways, on to the Mets for this edition of 30 Clubs in 30 Days.

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2017 Results:

Record: 70-92, 27 games behind Washington Nationals, 17 games behind Colorado Rockies for 2nd Wild Card spot

Notable Offseason Additions: RF Jay Bruce, 3B Todd Frazier, 1B Adrian Gonzalez, RP Anthony Swarzak, OF Matthew den Dekker

Notable Offseason Subtractions: RP Erik Goeddel, SP Tommy Milone, RP Josh Edgin

Best Offensive Player: LF Yoenis Cespedes

Best Pitcher: Noah Syndergaard

Depth Chart:

C-Travis d’Arnaud, Kevin Plawecki

1B-Adrian Gonzalez, Dominic Smith

2B-Asdrubal Cabrera

3B-Todd Frazier, Wilmer Flores, David Wright

SS-Amed Rosario, Jose Reyes

LF-Yoenis Cespedes

CF-Michael Conforto, Juan Lagares

RF-Jay Bruce

SP-Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom, Matt Harvey, Steven Matz, Jason Vargas, Robert Gsellman, Zach Wheeler, Seth Lugo

Bullpen-Jeurys Familia (CP), Jeremy Blevins, AJ Ramos, Anthony Swarzak, Hansel Robles, Paul Sewald, Rafael Montero

Coaching Staff:

Manager-Mickey Callaway (1st season with Mets

Hitting Coach-Pat Roessler

Pitching Coach-Dave Eiland

1st Base Coach-Ruben Amaro Jr

3rd Base Coach-Glenn Sherlock

Bench Coach-Gary DiSarcina

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It feels like so long ago that the Mets were good even though they just had one bad season. They won the NL pennant in 2015, losing the World Series in 5 games to the Royals, and they lost the NL Wild Card game against the Giants in 2016. But in 2017 the wheels seemed to fall off, causing the Mets machine to fall off the wheels, crash and burn, and kill everybody inside as injuries ravaged the team. But when healthy, this has the potential to be a scary team. Here’s how I’m projecting their lineup to look in 2018.

1. Asdrubal Cabrera-2B

2. Michael Conforto-CF

3. Yoenis Cespedes-LF

4. Jay Bruce-RF

5. Todd Frazier-3B

6. Adrian Gonzalez-1B

7. Travis d’Arnaud-C

8. Amed Rosario-SS

9. Pitcher’s Spot

There’s a lot of talent in this lineup, particularly in the middle of the order. Michael Conforto broke out in 2017, earning an All Star nod by hitting .279 with 27 home runs and was worth 4.4 WAR. He will likely miss the start of the season due to injury (shocker) and it will probably be defensive wizard Juan Lagares in centerfield. Yoenis Cespedes is a guy I really liked but he didn’t seem to hit his stride until he was traded to the Mets, as his bat was what really propelled them to the 2015 NL pennant. Come to think of it, good things tend to happen to teams involved in a Cespedes trade. The A’s landed Jon Lester from the Red Sox, the Red Sox landed Rick Porcello from the Tigers, and the Tigers landed Michael Fulmer from the Mets. Go figure. But despite missing half the 2017 season due to injury, Cespedes was on pace for an MVP-caliber season. He was hitting .292 with 17 home runs and 42 RBI, which in a full 162-game season would be 34 home runs and 84 RBI. Jay Bruce is returning to the Mets after they traded him to the Indians at last year’s trade deadline. Bruce was terrific for the Mets, hitting 29 home runs and driving in 75 RBI in just 103 games with the club. Frazier and Gonzalez both struggled last season but they both have powerful bats and can cause some serious damage to a pitching staff if taken lightly.

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The Mets may have the single most injury-prone pitching rotation I’ve ever seen. It seems like within the last two seasons every member of their 4-headed monster of Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom, Matt Harvey, and Steven Matz all have missed significant time due to injury, the latter two’s effectiveness having been harmed the most. While Syndergaard looks like he’s fully recovered from the lat injury that sidelined him for nearly all of 2017 (his fastball was touching 101 mph in his first Spring Training outing), the rest of the rotation isn’t so sure. DeGrom was solid last season, going 15-10 with a 3.53 ERA and striking out over 10 batters per 9 innings, but Harvey and Matz left a lot to be desired. Matz had an ERA over 6 in 13 starts while Harvey was better known for having not shown up to a game due to being hung over after drinking his sorrows away after seeing his ex girlfriend, supermodel Adriana Lima, hanging around with Julian Edelman. So the only guys I’m not concerned with are Syndergaard and deGrom but Matz and Harvey make me nervous. Again, assuming everybody’s healthy.

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The Mets bullpen has some guys with really electric stuff. In fact, the only regular member of last year’s bullpen with a K/9 rate below 8 was Josh Edgin and he’s now a member of the Baltimore Orioles. The closer for the Mets is Jeurys Familia, however he’s also coming off an injury-plagued season, as he only managed to pitch 24.2 innings in 2017. However when healthy, he’s amongst the best closers in the game. Should he struggle to return to health, though, the Mets have AJ Ramos, whom they acquired from the Marlins last trade deadline. Ramos was an All Star as the Marlins’ closer in 2016, though he struggled with his command upon joining the Mets. He struck out over 11 batters per 9 innings but also walked over 5 batters per 9. He’s going to need to drop that second number significantly if he hopes to earn new manager and pitching guru Mickey Callaway’s trust. Newly-acquired reliever Anthony Swarzak was a revelation last season with the White Sox and Brewers last season, pitching to an ERA of 2.33 with over 10.5 K/9 in his age-31 season. Whether he repeats that success remains to be seen but if last season was any indicator, the Mets have themselves a reliable 8th-inning option.

Overall, I don’t think the Mets are nearly as bad as last season’s record might indicate but they NEED to limit the injuries if they’re going to have any hope of competing for the playoffs. When fully healthy, I think this team is good enough to compete with the Nationals for the NL East crown. However that seems to be asking a lot out of them as of late and I’m not so sure they’re going to be able to overcome these shortcomings this season. However the NL East is pretty weak right now so I don’t think it’ll be too hard for the Mets to come in second place in the division, in fact I do think they’ll be healthy enough to compete for a Wild Card spot, though I think they will fall short.

Projected Finish: 84-78, 2nd in NL East

That’s going to do it for this edition of 30 Clubs in 30 Days. I feel like I wrote this blog twice (that’s because I did. I was halfway through my first edition when my computer freaked out on me and I lost my entire draft. Though to be honest, I feel like this version is way better than the one that got deleted). Join me tomorrow when I preview the New York Yankees, who on paper have the most dangerous 3-4 combo since Ruth-Gehrig. Let me know what you think of the Mets’ chances in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10. Also, if you’re looking for something to do at 3 PM as you get ready for Spring Break (or continue partying during Spring Break), I’ll be on the call for a college baseball game between Indiana and Pacific on BTN Plus.