30 Clubs in 30 Days: Pittsburgh Pirates

Since I know you’re all clamoring for it, here’s my bracket. Congratulations to Villanova on their second national championship in 3 years, third overall. I did make it safely into Fort Lauderdale, encountered a lot of problems, but everything is good. The wifi in my hotel is AWFUL, so there may be a chance that I have to miss a day on the blog. Fingers crossed I don’t have to. But anyway, let’s get to today’s edition of 30 Clubs in 30 Days, featuring the Pittsburgh Pirates.


2017 Results:

Record: 75-87, 17 games behind Chicago Cubs, 12 games behind Colorado Rockies for 2nd Wild Card Spot

Notable Offseason Additions: LF Corey Dickerson, OF Daniel Nava, SP Joe Musgrove, 3B Colin Moran, LF Michael Saunders, RP Kyle Crick

Notable Offseason Subtractions: OF Andrew McCutchen, SP Gerrit Cole, 1B John Jaso, RP Daniel Hudson, RP Joaquin Benoit, RP Dan Runzler, C Chris Stewart

Best Offensive Player: CF Starling Marte

Best Pitcher: Ivan Nova

Depth Chart:

C-Francisco Cervelli, Elias Diaz

1B-Josh Bell

2B-Josh Harrison, Sean Rodriguez

3B-David Freese, Colin Moran

SS-Jordy Mercer

LF-Corey Dickerson, Adam Frazier

CF-Starling Marte

RF-Gregory Polanco, Bryce Brentz

SP-Ivan Nova, Jameson Taillon, Joe Musgrove, Chad Kuhl, Trevor Williams, Tyler Glasnow

Bullpen-Felipe Rivero (CP), George Kontos, Kyle Crick, Michael Feliz, AJ Schugel, Dovydas Neverauskas, Edgar Santana

Coaching Staff:

Manager-Clint Hurdle (8th season with Pirates)

Hitting Coach-Jeff Branson

Pitching Coach-Ray Searage

1st Base Coach-Kimera Bartee

3rd Base Coach-Joey Cora

Bench Coach-Tom Prince


The Pirates are all in on their rebuild. They traded their two most prolific players in Andrew McCutchen and Gerrit Cole to try and build for the future. They didn’t take the next step after their breakthrough starting in 2013 and now they’re trending back towards mediocrity. It’s a smart move to get out in front of these rebuilds, especially if they didn’t have any real chance at competing in the first place. Here’s a look at the potential lineup for the Pirates.

1. Corey Dickerson-LF

2. Josh Harrison-2B

3. Starling Marte-CF

4. Josh Bell-1B

5. Gregory Polanco-RF

6. Francisco Cervelli-C

7. David Freese/Colin Moran-3B

8. Jordy Mercer-SS

9. Pitcher’s Spot

There’s a lot of underperforming talent in this lineup. It starts with Starling Marte, who is a freak athlete but got busted for PED’s last season and missed 80 games. In his limited time last season, he hit .275 with 7 home runs and 31 RBI with 21 stolen bags and a 1.2 WAR. He’s one of the fastest players in the game and a talented hitter but he’s one of those guys that I think could be so much better but for whatever reason just hasn’t taken that next step. Josh Harrison is a guy I enjoy watching play. There’s just something about him that gets me excited to watch him go. Last season he hit .272 with 16 home runs and 66 RBI while being able to play pretty much every position imaginable. Josh Bell was a breakout stud for them last season, hitting .255 with 26 home runs and 90 RBI, providing a big power bat in the middle of their lineup. But after those guys there isn’t a whole lot. Gregory Polanco was a guy I heard several people compare to Barry Bonds when he debuted and he has been far from being that dangerous threat. He had a pretty solid 2016 but his 2017 left a lot to be desired. He hit .251 with 11 home runs and 35 RBI while playing a pretty good right field but also being one of the worst baserunners in baseball. There is some talent in their minor league system such as Austin Meadows, who could be seeing some playing time before this season gets out. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Pirates selling some of their talented assets at the Trade Deadline for a team trying to make a late push for the postseason.


After trading Gerrit Cole, there isn’t much to go off of in this Pirates rotation in 2018. Slated to start opening day for the Bucs is Ivan Nova, who has been just okay since joining Pittsburgh after a disappointing tenure with the Yankees. Last year he went 11-14 with a 4.14 ERA while posting a measly 6 K/9. He isn’t a bad pitcher but being a team’s ace is nowhere near where his talent merits. Jameson Taillon is a talented guy and he showed a lot of ability last season before being diagnosed with testicular cancer. He was able to return after successful surgery and was able to make 25 starts, going 8-7 with a 4.44 ERA but a 3.48 FIP, suggesting the Pirates’ defense wasn’t a big help for him. Taillon is a guy who could be the team ace by next season and I think he’s someone they can build this rotation around. Tyler Glasnow is another talented pitcher in the rotation but he’s been a nightmare at the Major League level. He carries a career 6.75 ERA in 22 appearances and 17 starts. I don’t expect this rotation to really do a whole lot, they did finish 13th in the Majors in team ERA last season but they lost their best pitcher in Gerrit Cole and didn’t acquire anybody that will ease that loss.


There isn’t much talent in the Pirates bullpen with the exception of their closer Felipe Rivero. Rivero really burst onto the scene in 2017. He posted a 1.67 ERA while striking out over 10 batters per 9 innings and recorded 21 saves. His fastball can touch 100 miles per hour and he’s got the breaking ball to throw off hitters’ timing like you wouldn’t believe. After him, though, there’s a pretty steep drop. George Kontos is a decent reliever with a pretty solid cutter but the rest of that ‘pen is filled with guys I’ve never heard of. Though looking at their numbers, AJ Schugel is a guy I should start paying attention to, as he posted an ERA of 1.97 in 32 appearances. But otherwise there isn’t a whole lot to really be paying attention to at the moment.

Overall, I don’t expect much out of the Pirates. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if this whole team gets blown up at the trade deadline. After a few good players there’s a pretty steep drop in productivity that will really limit this team’s ceiling. Clint Hurdle, who is an excellent manager, will likely be on the way out as they get into a full rebuild process once they start to drop in the standings.

Projected Record: 76-86, 4th in NL Central

That’s going to do it for this edition of 30 Clubs in 30 Days. Join me tomorrow when I discuss the San Diego Padres, whom I got to briefly work for at the Home Run Derby in 2016 and really got me invested in their culture (pretty much just worshiping Tony Gwynn). Let me know what you think of the Pirates’ chances in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

30 Clubs in 30 Days: Boston Red Sox

Some huge news in the college basketball world as some initial reports have been released regarding current and former players and improper benefits from either schools or agents. The biggest names listed are Michigan State’s Miles Bridges (as if Michigan State needed any more scandals), Alabama’s Colin Sexton, Duke’s Wendell Carter, Markelle Fultz of the 76ers (attended Washington), Kyle Kuzma of the Lakers (attended Utah), and Dennis Smith Jr of the Mavericks (attended NC State). The investigation is still ongoing so I’ll provide more details when more information is released. Also, a big trade was agreed upon between the Kansas City Chiefs and Los Angeles Rams, as the Chiefs are sending star cornerback Marcus Peters to LA for a package of draft picks. This just made an already good Rams defense absolutely terrifying. But today is 30 Clubs in 30 Days and I’m featuring the Boston Red Sox. As I’m sure readers of my blog are well aware, I’m a Red Sox fan, so I apologize if I go a little more in depth with them than other teams. I’m only human. So let’s get a look at the Red Sox’ chances in 2018.


2017 Results:

Record: 93-69, Won AL East over New York Yankees by 2 games, lost to Houston Astros in ALDS

Notable Offseason Additions: OF JD Martinez

Notable Offseason Subtractions: RP Addison Reed, OF Chris Young, RP Fernando Abad, RP Blaine Boyer, 2B Josh Rutledge, CF Rajai Davis, SP Henry Owens, SP Doug Fister

Best Offensive Player: RF Mookie Betts

Best Pitcher: Chris Sale

Depth Chart:

C-Christian Vazquez, Sandy Leon

1B-Hanley Ramirez, Mitch Moreland

2B-Dustin Pedroia, Eduardo Nunez

3B-Rafael Devers, Deven Marrero

SS-Xander Bogaerts

LF-Andrew Benintendi, Brock Holt

CF-Jackie Bradley Jr

RF-Mookie Betts, JD Martinez (DH)

SP-Chris Sale, David Price, Rick Porcello, Drew Pomeranz, Eduardo Rodriguez, Steven Wright

Bullpen-Craig Kimbrel (CP), Joe Kelly, Matt Barnes, Heath Hembree, Carson Smith, Tyler Thornburg, Austin Maddox, Brandon Workman, Robby Scott

Coaching Staff:

Manager-Alex Cora (1st season with Red Sox)

Hitting Coach-Tim Hyers

Pitching Coach-Dana LeVangie

1st Base Coach-Tom Goodwin

3rd Base Coach-Carlos Febles

Bench Coach-Ron Roenicke


The Red Sox regressed in a big way offensively in 2017. After scoring the most runs in the American League in 2016, they dropped off significantly and finished dead last in the American League in home runs. For a while, it didn’t look like they were going to do a whole lot to change things other than bring back guys from last year’s team (Mitch Moreland and Eduardo Nunez). That was until they signed JD Martinez to a 5-year $110M deal. I won’t expand too much about his potential role in Boston, as I did so in the blog I just linked. Now they look to get back on track under rookie manager Alex Cora. Here’s a look at how the Red Sox are projected to line up in 2018.

1. Eduardo Nunez/Dustin Pedroia-2B

2. Andrew Benintendi-LF

3. Mookie Betts-RF

4. JD Martinez-DH

5. Xander Bogaerts-SS

6. Hanley Ramirez/Mitch Moreland-1B

7. Rafael Devers-3B

8. Christian Vazquez/Sandy Leon-C

9. Jackie Bradley Jr-CF


Now on paper that’s a pretty imposing lineup as long as they can return to their 2016 forms because only Christian Vazquez took a step forward at the dish in 2017. It’s an entirely new coaching staff with a different philosophy so it’ll be interesting to see how they do things. Alex Cora stated recently that he doesn’t really get the whole “lefty/lefty righty/righty” conundrum, stating something along the lines of “you’ve been hitting lefties all your life and now all of a sudden you can’t hit lefties when you reach the Majors? Doesn’t make sense to me.” He hasn’t even managed a meaningful game yet and I already love his style. But there is a ton of ability in this lineup if Cora and company can get the most out of it. The young stars have been nicknamed the Killer B’s, consisting of Mookie Betts, Xander Bogaerts, Jackie Bradley Jr, and Andrew Benintendi, all of whom can take over games when teams aren’t careful. Betts is the most dangerous of the bunch, as he was AL MVP runner-up in 2016 and despite taking a step back in 2017, was still their best hitter, batting .264 with 24 home runs, 102 RBI, 26 stolen bases, 32 DRS, and was worth 5.1 WAR. Bogaerts is another talented hitter but he’s also extremely streaky. When he’s hot, he’s impossible to get out. You’ll see 3-4 game after 3-4 game and his batting average will skyrocket up into the .350’s. But when he’s cold, you have to work your ass off to let up a hit to him. In fact, there was a long stretch in the middle of the season where Bogaerts was the worst statistical hitter in baseball. Jackie Bradley is another guy who can be streaky, like Bogaerts, but unlike Bogaerts, Bradley is an excellent defender at a premium position so when he’s not hitting well, he can still make excellent contributions in the field. I listed Bradley as the 9th hitter mainly because he’s had so much success in that position. In fact, it’s been a while since I updated this stat, but last I checked, Bradley was a career .346 hitter when batting 9th. Benintendi was the runner-up for AL Rookie of the Year last season and probably would have won it, too if Aaron Judge didn’t set the rookie record with 52 home runs and finished runner-up for AL MVP. Benintendi hit .271 with 20 home runs, 90 RBI, and 20 stolen bases while playing a solid left field. Another guy the Red Sox have to be excited about is third baseman Rafael Devers. Devers is a bad defender at the hot corner and I think that he’s going to have to eventually switch to either first base or start DH’ing before long. But he shows bat discipline well beyond his years (he turns 22 in October). Watching Devers’ at bats as a youngster, I noticed that he doesn’t try and do his own thing at the plate. He takes what the pitcher gives him and goes with the pitch. For example, he’s not going to try and pull everything. If he’s thrown a curveball low and away, he’ll wait patiently for it to get to him and will send it the other way. He’s a guy I’m really excited for in his first full season in a Red Sox uniform.


The Red Sox pitching was fantastic in 2017, as they finished 4th in the Majors with a 3.73 team ERA. That was thanks in large part to their trade acquisition of Chris Sale from the Chicago White Sox in the 2017 offseason. Sale was an absolute monster in his first season in a Red Sox uniform, going 17-8 with a 2.90 ERA and 308 strikeouts. He was 5 strikeouts away from tying Pedro Martinez’s franchise record, a record he likely would’ve broken had he been allowed to pitch his last start. However that start came at a time that would’ve affected his ability to start Game 1 of the ALDS so I think then-manager John Farrell made the right move there. David Price was battling injuries throughout the year but he was pretty solid when he was on the mound and even better when he was placed in the bullpen. He finished the year at 6-3 with a 3.38 ERA, which included an ERA of 0.00 in 5 relief appearances. A fully healthy season for Price would be huge for the Red Sox. Rick Porcello had a rough follow-up to his Cy Young-winning 2016 season, as he went 11-17 (most losses in baseball) with a 4.65 ERA. However he is still one of the more talented pitchers on the Red Sox roster and if he can return to form in 2018, that’s three aces at the top of the Red Sox rotation. And that’s without even mentioning Drew Pomeranz, who after a brutal first 2 months of the season, was absolutely terrific for the Sox. In the second half of the season, his ERA was 3.01, bringing his overall line to 17-6 with a 3.32 ERA. Not bad for your fourth starter.


The Red Sox bullpen is also expected to be very strong, spearheaded by the American League’s Reliever of the Year in Craig Kimbrel. Kimbrel was dynamite in 2017, as he finished with 35 saves, a 1.43 ERA, and a Strikeout per 9 rate of 16.43, which is absolutely ridiculous. Provided Kimbrel can stay healthy, the 9th inning will be a sure thing for the Red Sox. It’s the rest of the bullpen that has some question marks. Joe Kelly had a breakthrough season as a reliever, including throwing the fastest pitch ever by a righty at 103.5 mph and finished with a 2.79 ERA but that was after being in the low 1’s for much of the year. Tyler Thornburg and Carson Smith hope to be big parts of the Red Sox bullpen but both guys are recovering from injuries. Smith was able to appear at the end of the 2017 season and he did pitch pretty well, pitching to a 1.35 ERA in 8 appearances. Thornburg, however, has yet to pitch an inning for the Red Sox after being acquired from the Brewers in the Travis Shaw trade. He was Milwaukee’s closer prior to the trade so he’s another guy the Sox have to be excited for. The Red Sox could potentially have one of the top bullpens in baseball if they can stay healthy.

Overall, I think the Red Sox have a legitimate shot at a World Series. Basically every facet of their team could rank amongst the top 5 in baseball. The problem is going to be getting by the Yankees, who made the biggest move of the offseason when they acquired Giancarlo Stanton in a trade with the Marlins. It’s going to be a fight to the death between those two teams. The return to form of the hitters in this Red Sox lineup will go a long way towards the success of Alex Cora’s first year as manager. If all goes well, this team could win 100 games.

Projected Finish: 95-67, Host AL Wild Card Game against Anaheim Angels

That’s going to do it for Day 5 of 30 Clubs in 30 Days. Join me tomorrow when I discuss the Chicago Cubs, who are looking to win the NL Central for the third straight season and will try and win their second World Series in 3 years. Let me know what you think of the Red Sox’ chances in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

A Look At the Managerial Hunts in MLB

So we’ve had five managers lose their jobs since the start of their team’s offseason: Terry Collins with the Mets, Pete Mackanin with the Phillies, John Farrell with the Red Sox, Brad Ausmus with the Tigers, and most recently, Dusty Baker with the Nationals. The Nationals and Phillies positions have yet to be filled and I will briefly discuss their situations. As for the other three teams, the Mets have hired away former Indians pitching coach Mickey Callaway, the Tigers have hired Diamondbacks bench coach Ron Gardenhire, and the Red Sox will make their hiring of Astros bench coach Alex Cora official after the Astros finish the World Series. I talked in the John Farrell article that I linked above about what I think of Ron Gardenhire so I won’t go into too much depth about his hiring with the Tigers. So let’s look over the managerial hires.

Mickey Callaway to the Mets:

This was long overdue. Callaway is, or was, in my opinion the best pitching coach in baseball and now you give him an extremely talented group of starting pitchers that underachieved last season as a whole. It just makes too much sense for the Mets to hire Callaway. He had great success, particularly over the last two or three seasons as the Indians pitching coach. I think he did a great job getting the most he can out of Trevor Bauer, who is a really talented pitcher but can’t seem to get out of his own way. He also did a good job with Josh Tomlin, who would give up bomb after bomb but then when the Indians needed a big game out of him, like in the 2016 postseason, he stepped up and delivered. For the Mets, Noah Syndergaard missed almost the entire season due to a lat issue while Matt Harvey has pretty much disappeared into oblivion and Steven Matz refuses to take the next step. Jacob deGrom was the only member of that super rotation whom I felt had a strong season and even then his numbers were low-end number 2 starter high-end number 3 (3.53 ERA). Callaway is going to be a huge addition to getting this Mets team back into relevance because this is the most talented pitching staff he’s ever had to work with, and that’s really saying something considering the talent he had on that Indians staff.

Ron Gardenhire to the Tigers:

I like Gardenhire a lot, he did a great job with the Twins from 2002-2014 especially considering they never had much of a payroll to work with. The Tigers had one of the highest payrolls in baseball before things went south and they gutted the team. I don’t know if there will be immediate success with Gardenhire in Detroit, but I am confident that he will set the Tigers back on the right track in short time.

Alex Cora to the Red Sox

Alex Cora is a guy I’ve heard a lot of hype surrounding his potential managerial career even while he was still playing. There was a point in the 2007 season where rookie second baseman Dustin Pedroia was struggling and Cora, seeing how much talent Pedroia had, worked with him to get better even though it would likely cost Cora his shot at a starting job at second base, which it did. Pedroia, with Cora’s help, went on to win the 2007 AL Rookie of the Year and helped lead Boston to the 2007 World Series championship and he followed that up with the 2008 AL MVP, the first by a second baseman in over 50 years. Basically every single Red Sox hitter took a big step back last season, most notably Xander Bogaerts and Cora seems like the right guy to get these guys back on track to the potent offense they can be.

The Nationals Job

The Nationals got ousted in Game 5 of the 2017 NLDS and it proved to be Dusty Baker’s last game as manager of the Nationals despite easily winning the NL East with a 97-65 record. This has to be a very desirable job in the short term, long term we will have to wait and see. The short term is that this is a LOADED roster, with All Star potential all over the pitching rotation and up and down the lineup. The problem may revolve around Bryce Harper, the Nats superstar outfielder. He is set to hit free agency after the conclusion of the 2018 season and the Nats aren’t expected to be able to retain him. They shelled out a big contract to Stephen Strasburg last year and with the current salaries on payroll, there won’t be the cap space to give Bryce Harper the $300M contract he would likely be able to get. If I’m GM Mike Rizzo, I want to be in win-right-the-fuck-now mode. Bryce Harper’s going to be gone soon and there may be a Phillies-esque contract situation where you may have given out too many huge contracts that it weights your team down when the guys’ skills start to deteriorate. Hell, Max Scherzer signed a 7-year $210M deal, but they’re going to spread the payments out over 14 years. So for 7 years after Scherzer’s contract is up, he will be making $15M a year to not play for the Nationals. Great for Scherzer, awful for the future Nats. You want to at least be like Ruben Amaro Jr and be able to hang your hat on that one World Series title you got when you need to find your next job. For Amaro, that job was first base coach of the Boston Red Sox. But Rizzo has yet to have that manager that gets them over the top. So who fits the bill? Certainly not Brad Ausmus, he had loads of talent in Detroit and couldn’t do better than a 90 win season and a quick playoff exit. The other top candidates that I listed above are all gone. Gene Lamont doesn’t seem to be going anywhere in Detroit. One name I would keep an eye on for these Nats is their current pitching coach Mike Maddux. Maddux’s name was thrown all over the place as a potential managerial candidate when he was pitching coach of the Texas Rangers when they went to back-to-back World Series’ from 2010-11. Those talks never gained much traction and he has yet to get a real gig. The team won 97 games this year so I think an in-house hire might be a good idea in this situation because you want to keep up that regular season success. You just need a guy that can get you over the top. Maddux has potential, but he’s not a sure thing like what Joe Maddon was when he left the Rays and joined the Cubs. It’ll be risky because there has to be some sort of reason why Maddux never got a managerial job, but I think he would be the safest choice for Washington.

The Phillies Job

This has to be one of the most undesirable jobs in baseball. The Phillies are sorely lacking in the talent department and have been for quite some time. They are finally rid of Ryan Howard’s enormous contract and can at long last make some plays for some free agents. The problem will be convincing guys to come play for Philly. First of all, I know this is a little unfair but their reputation precedes them, is finding a guy who can deal with the fans. Philly fans are notorious for being ruthless when things aren’t going well and even when they are, they still find something to boo. That’s probably overgeneralizing, but the fact of the matter is these fans have been starved for good baseball for over 5 years now and those dominant teams of the late-2000’s seems like a long lost memory. I felt that Pete Mackanin got as much out of the lack of talent that the team had as he could, but it just wasn’t meant to be. The Phillies went 66-96 in 2017, second worst record in the NL and they need to find a guy they can trust for the long haul to be part of a rebuild. Philly sports has been known for “Trust the Process” as the 76ers and Joel Embiid have made so popular, and it’s high time the Phillies showed some semblance of a process. They don’t appear to have any direction. Personally, if I’m Team President Andy McPhail, I would clean house and start from scratch. I’d trade every asset I have for top prospects and find a GM with a fresh take on how the organization should be run. That’s basically what the Astros did a few years ago and look at them now. The Phillies really don’t have much going for them and if you’re going to suck, you might as well build towards the future. But who should be the manager for this team? Well the Phillies are amazingly in week 4 of their search, which is bonkers to me. If you’re going to let a manager go, you’ve got to have some sort of succession plan. Hell, Dave Dombrowski was considering his options for next Red Sox manager during the ALDS when Farrell still held the damn job! One guy I think would be perfect for this job is Gabe Kapler. I may be biased because he was a beloved member of the Red Sox teams from my youth, but this guy was neck and neck with Dave Roberts for the Dodgers job a couple years ago. If an organization like the Dodgers is seriously considering you as comparable to as good a manager as Roberts, there’s got to be something to it. I don’t know a whole lot about Kapler’s abilities as an in-game manager, but I do know that he is a likable guy who really helps tie a clubhouse together. He’s currently the director of player development with the Dodgers and you’ve seen what kinds of rookies they’ve turned out over the last couple years as well as some of the breakout seasons they’ve had (ie: Corey Seager, Cody Bellinger, Chris Taylor). If a guy does that well with developing young talent, then he would be the perfect candidate to lead a rebuild.

Those are my thoughts on the current managerial situations around baseball. Agree? Disagree? Let me know in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.