The Most Unbreakable Records in Sports

So I read an article on MLB.com, which you can read here, about 17 of the most unbreakable records in baseball, which believe me, there’s a lot more than 17. This was written in response to yesterday being the 80th anniversary of Johnny Vander Meer’s second consecutive no hitter. But I thought I’d take it a step further and talk about all of sports. I won’t touch on any of the ones they mentioned in the article because the fact I’m stealing their idea for an article doesn’t mean I should steal their content too (even though this article has definitely been written before, but whatever, I’m trying to be a good person). I’m going to do MLB, NFL, and NBA because again, those are the only sports I know anything about.

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MLB-Cy Young’s 511 Career Wins

How this one wasn’t on the MLB.com article is beyond me because this is probably the most untouchable record in sports. People are pretty much in agreement that nobody will ever win 300 games again. Cy Young won 511. Now the Wins stat for pitchers has certainly taken a deep dive in importance, especially considering all the factors that go into achieving one. I mean, Hell, look at Jacob deGrom right now. He has a 1.55 ERA and has won just 4 games this year. But regardless, the Wins stat was the most regarded stat for a long time in baseball before bullpens and pitch counts became so important and is a big reason why the award for pitching excellence bears Young’s name. Here are a few interesting tidbits about how Young reached 511 wins:

-He won at least 30 games in a season 4 times (the average starter that spends the entire season in the Majors and off the DL typically starts about 32-33 games)

-He factored into 50 decisions in 1893 and factored in at least 30 decisions in all but 3 seasons: his rookie year and final 2 seasons

-He pitched over 400 innings in a season 5 times

-Aside from his rookie year, he didn’t throw under 200 innings in a season until he was 43

Amazingly, though, Young is not a member of the 3000 strikeout club despite how many innings he threw. In fact, he only struck out 200 batters in a season twice in his 22-year career. His K/9 was 1.5(!!!). People wonder what’s wrong with Cardinals rookie reliever Jordan Hicks for his K/9 being in the 5’s when he can touch 105 mph on his sinker. The worst in the Majors last season was Giants starter Ty Blach at 4.01. Now granted, the average MLB team only struck out about 2-4 times during this time period vs about 8 times today, but that would still put Young below average for his era.

MLB-Sam Crawford’s 309 Career Triples

Triples were so much easier to hit when Crawford was raising Hell as a Detroit Tiger and Cincinnati Red from 1899-1917. The ballparks were much bigger and home runs were considered to be bad strategy. Crawford averaged roughly 20 triples per season over his 18 MLB seasons. The last time anyone hit 20 triples in a season was Curtis Granderson and Jimmy Rollins in 2007 (both guys actually hit 20 doubles, 20 triples, and 20 home runs in that season). That was a typical season for Crawford. Among the career triples leaderboard, the highest-ranked active player is Jose Reyes with 128 career triples and he’s tied for 84th all time and 181 behind Crawford. Nobody is touching 309.

NFL-Jerry Rice’s 22,895 career receiving yards and 197 receiving touchdowns

Despite the rise of the passing game in the NFL, these numbers aren’t getting eclipsed. Back when Rice played, the passing game was always on the backburner to the ground game and teams weren’t as concerned with stopping it as they are today. If a receiver was putting up Rice’s numbers today, they’d be getting double-teamed like crazy and would open up more opportunities for other receivers. Rice played 20 seasons in the NFL, which doesn’t happen very often for kickers anymore, let alone receivers. The next closest receiver in career receiving yards is Terrell Owens at 15,934 yards (though Larry Fitzgerald is RIGHT behind him at 15,545) and the next closest in receiving touchdowns is Randy Moss with 156. The fact that we’re in this era of receiving and still nobody is close just proves that nobody is touching Rice.

NFL-Paul Krause’s 81 career interceptions (also, Dick “Night Train” Lane’s 14 interceptions in a season in 1952)

There were a few guys who were approaching this lately, like Rod Woodson finished with 71 picks and Ed Reed reached 64, but nobody is ever going to eclipse Krause’s 81 career interceptions and nobody is ever going to even sniff Lane’s 14 for a season. My main reason behind this is simple: when a guy is starting to rack up a lot of picks, quarterbacks start to avoid them. There hasn’t been a guy with 10 interceptions in a season since Antonio Cromartie in 2007 so despite the rise in passing numbers, I don’t foresee anybody sniffing Krause or Lane’s numbers just because NFL teams wizen up to known ballhawks now.

NBA-Pretty much any record Wilt Chamberlain still has

100 points in a game, 23,924 career rebounds, 50.1 points per game in a season, those are the three big ones that aren’t getting sniffed. Chamberlain accomplished a lot of these while there was no 3-second rule so he could just hang out in the paint all game. He was also just much bigger than everybody else and could just bully opposing players into getting his shot or grabbing the board. Nowadays, you risk a loss of possession and potential free throws for the other team. Kobe Bryant dropped 81 points in 2006 and he was still almost 20 points behind Wilt, which would be a solid game for most players. Dwight Howard is the active leader in career rebounds and he’s still about 8,000 behind Wilt, and nobody has gotten more than 40 PPG for a season this millennium. Wilt’s numbers are safe.

Sports-Bill Russell’s 11 Championships as a Player

And he did it in 13 career seasons. The next closest is Yogi Berra’s 10 with the Yankees and we’re not seeing any dynasties like we saw in the 1950’s and 1960’s when these guys played. For one, both feats were accomplished when their leagues were about half the size that they are now. Plus free agency and salary caps are a thing now and it’s hard to maintain a team that is dominant for such a long stretch of time because pieces are constantly changing. The most titles of a player in any sport in the last 30 years is Michael Jordan’s 6. Russell almost doubled that and he played 2 fewer seasons. In a season that Bill Russell played in, there was an 85% chance he was winning the title. I bitch about the lack of parity in today’s NBA but it was NOTHING compared to the 1960’s when the Celtics won 8 titles in a row. But I probably wouldn’t have bitched about that since I’m a Celtics fan myself. Yeah I’m that type of fan, sue me.

So that’s just a look at just a few records that I don’t think have any chance of falling anytime soon, or ever, for that matter. The way the game has evolved has rendered these marks as untouchable. Let me know if there are other records you can think of that will never be eclipsed in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

 

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