MLB Hall of Fame Ballot Released

Yes, I know, they don’t announce the MLB Hall of Fame class of 2018 until January, but the finalists were announced and I couldn’t help myself. Plus, I wanted material to write about. Here is the list of candidates:

Barry Bonds

Roger Clemens

Vladimir Guerrero

Trevor Hoffman

Jeff Kent

Edgar Martinez

Fred McGriff

Mike Mussina

Manny Ramirez

Curt Schilling

Gary Sheffield

Sammy Sosa

Billy Wagner

Larry Walker

Chris Carpenter

Johnny Damon

Livan Hernandez

Oliver Hudson

Aubrey Huff

Jason Isringhausen

Andruw Jones

Chipper Jones

Carlos Lee

Brad Lidge

Hideki Matsui

Kevin Millwood

Jamie Moyer

Scott Rolen

Johan Santana

Jim Thome

Omar Vizquel

Kerry Wood

Carlos Zambrano

I’m going to discuss which guys I think should get in. I’m really hesitant to pick guys who were linked to PED’s. I know that Ivan Rodriguez was named in the Mitchell Report and still got in last year, so it’s only a matter of time before guys like Bonds and Clemens get in. But I really don’t want to vote for one. I get the argument in favor of putting known PED users in, I really do, but I’m still uncomfortable with voting for one. If they get in, fine, the rest of baseball feels differently than I do (which could probably be an entire blog on its own. Maybe around election time), but I won’t vote them in. So sorry Barry and Roger, but you don’t have my vote. Here’s a tissue.

My other rules for who gets in are pretty simple: be one of the greats. I don’t care which ballot you’re on, if you’re a Hall of Famer, you’re a Hall of Famer in my book. There are some voters who are of the belief of “well Joe DiMaggio only got in on the third ballot, this guy can’t be first ballot because DiMaggio wasn’t.” That’s a load of shit. First of all, Joltin’ Joe should’ve been first ballot. Secondly, as I mentioned just seconds ago, if you’re a Hall of Famer, you’re a Hall of Famer. Plain as that. Nobody usually remembers which ballot you got in on anyway, just that you got in. So with that, let’s look at who I would vote for, with holdovers going first and newcomers going second.

Vladimir Guerrero

vladimir-guerrero-hall-of-fame

photo credit: Sports Illustrated

Postion: Right Field

Teams: Montreal Expos, Anaheim Angels, Texas Rangers, Baltimore Orioles

Accomplishments: 2004 AL MVP, 9-time All Star, 449 Home Runs, Career .318 hitter, Career WAR: 59.3

Vladdy was one of the greatest pure hitters of his generation. It’s a shame he never won a World Series, though he at least got to play in one in 2010 with the Texas Rangers. Guerrero was unique in that it didn’t matter where the pitch was, he could get a hit off of it. The song “Head-Shoulders-Knees-And-Toes” is perfectly applicable to Vlad’s personal strike zone. Most guys who swung the way Guerrero did would be out of the Majors faster than they could blink, but he hit .318 for 16 years. In fact, he never hit below .290 at any point in his career (and that was his final season). His 2002 season, despite not winning the MVP, was one of the greatest seasons of the Steroid Era and he didn’t need PED’s to do it. He hit 39 home runs, stole 40 bases, hit .336, drove in 111 runs, collected 206 hits, and played in 161 games. Yet somehow he only finished fourth for MVP that year. Maybe it was because he played for the Expos. His son, Vlad Jr, is one of the top prospects in all of baseball in the Toronto Blue Jays organization.

Trevor Hoffman

hoffman-kick

photo credit: The Mighty 1090

Position: Closing Pitcher

Teams: Florida Marlins, San Diego Padres, Milwaukee Brewers

Accomplishments: 601 Saves (was the all-time leader when he retired, has since been passed by Mariano Rivera), career 2.87 ERA, 7-time All Star, Career WAR: 28.0

Trevor Hoffman is amongst the greatest closers of all time, as evidenced by being the first man to ever reach 600 saves. A big reason why Rivera got a lot of the fame and Hoffman didn’t was Hoffman spent nearly all of his career with the lowly Padres while Rivera was dominating with the Yankees. I wouldn’t be surprised if Hoffman doesn’t get in on this ballot, as a lot of voters are hesitant to vote in a guy whose job was to pitch one inning every other game or so. But Hoffman was the best to ever do it in the National League and that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Edgar Martinez

01242017_EdgarMartinezY7-1020x791

photo credit: Seattle Times

Position: Designated Hitter

Team: Seattle Mariners

Accomplishments: Career .312 hitter, 309 home runs, 1261 RBI, 7-time All Star, drove in 145 RBI during the 2000 season at the age of 37, made the DH position what it is today, Career WAR: 68.3

This is one of the most controversial members of the ballot because Martinez was a career DH, he never played the field. I think Martinez should get in based simply on the fact that he was a revolutionary. He made the DH position what it is today. There is no David Ortiz, no Victor Martinez, no Nelson Cruz without the contributions of Edgar Martinez. Also look at that career WAR. Martinez’s career was only two years longer than Guerrero’s and he was worth almost 10 wins more than the stud outfielder and that’s for a guy who never had any defense contribute to that. That’s how good a hitter he was.

Mike Mussina

bal-former-orioles-ace-mike-mussina-continues-to-gain-hall-of-fame-support-but-is-he-now-more-likely-to-20170118

photo credit: Baltimore Sun

Position: Starting Pitcher

Teams: Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees

Accomplishments: 270 wins (that stat is outdated today, but it means a little bit more during his era), 3.68 ERA (worth mentioning that for the bulk of his career, he had to face guys who were juiced on steroids, which likely inflated his ERA some), 2813 strikeouts, 5-time All Star, Career WAR: 82.7

The knock against Mike Mussina was that he was never truly dominant. He was just consistently good for 18 years. Mussina never won a title either, but damn was he close. He joined the Yankees in 2001, the year they lost to Arizona and just after their three-peat, and retired after 2008, the year before they beat the Phillies. Just shit luck for Moose. But consistency is a big part of what makes a great pitcher and you always knew what you were going to get with Mussina and he had a knack for staying healthy and pitching deep into games, as he had 11 seasons where he pitched 200 innings, including 9 in a row from 1995-2003. I honestly wouldn’t be surprised if Mussina doesn’t get in this year because of the fact that he never dominated, which is the baseline for a lot of voters (myself included, but I like to reward being able to trust guys. That’s why I’m leaning towards voting for Mark Buehrle when he becomes eligible)

Curt Schilling

150825-silverman-curt-schilling-tease_ycnqrz

photo credit: The Daily Beast

Position: Starting Pitcher

Teams: Baltimore Orioles, Houston Astros, Philadelphia Phillies, Arizona Diamondbacks, Boston Red Sox

Accomplishments: 216 wins (see Mussina about my thoughts on pitching wins), 3116 strikeouts, 3-time World Series Champion, 2001 World Series Co-MVP with Hall of Famer Randy Johnson, Career ERA of 3.46, Career Playoff ERA of 2.23, 6-time All Star, Career WAR: 80.7

Quite frankly, with a resume like that, the only reason Curt Schilling isn’t in the Hall of Fame is because of his political beliefs. He is extremely right-winged and is very open about it and some of what he says can come off as hate speech (for example, his views on transgendered bathrooms and Islam got him fired from ESPN). But to keep him out of the Hall of Fame for that? That’s bullshit. You can’t keep a guy out of the Hall of Fame for what kind of person they are, no matter what your beliefs are. Ty Cobb was one of the biggest racists in the game and he was the first man ever inducted, so don’t give me that shit about his beliefs keeping him out. He was lights out in the playoffs and was one of the toughest pitchers on the planet. I will forever respect the Hell out of him for his performance in Game 6 of the 2004 ALCS, also known as the Bloody Sock game. If you don’t know what that is, shame on you. Schill gets my vote every time.

Chipper Jones

Chipper Jones

photo credit: Kansas.com

Position: Third Base

Team: Atlanta Braves

Accomplishments: 1999 NL MVP, 1995 World Series champion, 8-time All Star, 468 Home Runs, 1623 RBI, Career .303 hitter, 2008 batting champ by hitting .364 in 2008 at the age of 36, Career WAR: 85.0

Out of all the newcomers, Jones is my one lock to get in. The guy was the face of the Atlanta Braves for 18 years and was the key catalyst behind the Braves teams that won a division championship 13 years in a row. An average WAR in the Majors is 2.0. Chipper’s WAR never at any point in his career dipped below 2.3. In my opinion, he’s one of the ten best third basemen of all time.

Jim Thome

thome_bat

photo credit: NPR

Position: First Baseman/Designated Hitter

Teams: Cleveland Indians, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago White Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers, Minnesota Twins, Baltimore Orioles

Accomplishments: 612 home runs, 1699 RBI, 5-time All Star, career .276 hitter, Career WAR: 72.9

Jim Thome was one of my favorites growing up. Now granted, it was mainly because we had the same first name and I pronounced his last name as how it’s spelled, not “toe-mee,” which is how it’s actually pronounced, but I still really liked the guy. It helped that he was also considered one of the nicest guys in the game (now yes, the Schilling argument works both ways, it shouldn’t matter what type of dude you are to be in the Hall of Fame unless you were a serial killer, but it’s part of his reputation). Being one of the greatest power hitters of your generation also helps. 612 home runs ranks 8th all time, though his 2548 strikeouts is the second most all time. What does bode well for him in that aspect is the man in first place is in the Hall of Fame (Reggie Jackson).

Just Missed: Jeff Kent, Andruw Jones, Scott Rolen, Billy Wagner

Honorable Mention: Pete Rose

The fact that Pete Rose still can’t get in as a player is just idiotic. All records show that he bet on his team to win, which I have no problem with because you’re not out there to sabotage your own team. Had he bet against his guys, I’d be totally cool with keeping him out. But you can’t have the all-time hits king not in the Hall when a guy who was named in the Mitchell Report got in. Those are my picks for the Hall of Fame, though I think only Vladimir Guerrero and Chipper Jones will get in this year. I think Bonds and Clemens will eventually get in, but like I said before, I wouldn’t vote for them. Do you like my picks? Do you disagree with my stance on steroids? Let me know in the comments section below or on Facebook or Twitter @jimwyman10.

 

One thought on “MLB Hall of Fame Ballot Released

  1. Pingback: Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, and the PED/Hall of Fame Debate | Wyman's Sports

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s